Date

Sun - 20.08.2017


October 2012

Digital subscribers are accounting for an ever-more-generous slice of American newspapers’ circulation pumpkin this Halloween, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation (ABC)’s latest biannual study of 613 daily newspapers and 528 Sunday titles.

Overall, daily circulation has remained flat in the six months ending September 30, dropping by a mere 0.2 percent compared to the same period last year. But behind this placid mask, digital circulation— encompassing paid and restricted-access websites, mobile apps, PDF replicas and e-reader editions— rose as a proportion of total circulation by over 5 percent. It now accounts for an average of 15.3 percent of newspapers’ total circulation, up from 9.8 percent a year ago.

Leading the digital pack is The New York Times, with a circulation of over 896,000 across its digital platforms (with the data measurement caveat that one user accessing NYT content from multiple digital platforms may be counted more than once). Over half of subscriptions to The Times are now for digital editions.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-31 17:30

It has now been said repeatedly that India – together with Brazil – is a booming market for newspapers. Factors include economic growth, urbanization, an expanding middle class and rising literacy rates, as a recent report by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has said. As much has been written recently on the Indian news media, last month Professor George Brock, Head of Journalism at City University, collected the links in one place.

During catastrophes, reliable data is an essential part of news coverage. The Guardian Datablog mapped every verified event when Hurricane Sandy hit the US East Coast.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-10-30 18:58

After the high-profile merger of publishing giants Penguin and Random House comes a development in regional news with a significance that belies its parochial implications. Former Mirror Group chief executive David Montgomery is reportedly involved in talks to consolidate the local news assets of Northcliffe Media (regionals arm of the Daily Mail & General Trust), Trinity Mirror and Iliffe News and Media (parent company Yattendon Group) within his own venture, Local World, which he would lead, and of which he would be a part stake-holder. Such a scheme would not only provide evidently beneficial economies of scale, but would combine the number one, four and eleven publishers in UK regional news in an industry that is barely keeping its head above water.

Author

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-30 17:50

It’s official: Penguin and Random House are betrothed, their parent companies Pearson and Bertelsmann announced today.

As is often the case with arranged marriages, it is hoped that this union will allow the two houses to consolidate their power: together, the book publishers are expected to control over one quarter of the U.S. and British markets, and to generate approximately £2.5 billion (or $4 billion) in annual revenue.

And as with so many weddings these days, theirs is “subject to regulatory approval;” if all goes well, they will likely tie the knot in the latter half of 2013.

The idea of huddling together was no doubt influenced by the increasing need for publishers to puff out their chests against retailing giant Amazon, which has cornered 90 percent of the UK ebook market, and nearly 40 percent of the market for all books, according to Quartz.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-29 18:24

The New York Times Company’s share price experienced its furthest one-day drop in three years today after the company released third quarter results that showed an 85 percent decline in net income on the period a year earlier.

While analysts had predicted an average third quarter profit of 8 cents a share, the company reported a loss from continuing operations (excluding severance and other costs) of 1 cent a share.

During the quarterly earnings call today, Twitter users noted under the $NYT symbol that the company’s share price had fallen by 11, 13, and then 17 percent. (The decline stood at 14.6 percent at time of publication. View current price here).

On the call, Chairman and Interim CEO Arthur Sulzberger Jr. listed video, mobile and international expansion among growth areas for the company, and spoke of its engagement with Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google +, its new presence on Flipboard, and its experimental HTML 5 app for the iPad as crucial elements in its strategy.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-25 17:54

Today, Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to show the world the iPad’s mini me, following (as ever) months of hypothesising and (for once) the competition: Amazon and Google have already achieved success in the tiny tablet market with their Kindle Fire and Nexus 7 devices.

The Apple keynote will take place at 10 am PST in San José, California. “We have a little more to show you,” read the invitations, sent one week ago, seemingly substantiating the speculation that has been ricocheting across the web at least since February, when “the first credible rumour” of a mini iPad came from the Wall Street Journal. Taking place at the California Theatre, the unveiling event will likely be modest relative to Microsoft’s “no-expenses-spared” launch of its Surface tablet in New York, scheduled for Thursday, October 25.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-23 15:53

Flash quiz: what is the highest-circulation English-language newspaper in the world?

(Hint: Rupert Murdoch doesn’t own it.)

The correct answer, as you are likely aware, is the Times of India, which has a circulation of 4.3 million, and reaches an average of 7.64 million readers with each issue.

While money may not exactly be growing on trees in the news industry these days, the 174-year-old title, published by family-owned media conglomerate Bennett, Coleman & Company (B.C.C.L.), is planted in fertile soil: it is the most widely read English-language daily in a country where newspaper circulation is rising by 8 percent per year overall, and 1.5 percent per year for English-language newspapers.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-22 17:34

The New York Times is planning to further extend its international reach and tap into the promising Brazilian advertising market by launching a Portuguese-language website in the second half of next year.

The revelation follows a similar move by the Financial Times, which opened a newspaper printing plant in São Paulo earlier this month, and is taking strides to expand its Latin American web presence with a tailored homepage and mobile app.

Also rooted in São Paulo, The Times’ new site will feature approximately ten daily regional news stories reported and edited by local staff, and 20 or so articles translated from NYTimes.com. But the Portuguese-language content will not be paywall-protected (at least in the beginning); its revenue will depend entirely on advertising.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-16 23:57

On Wednesday, the WAN-IFRA New Media, New Challenges, New Business study tour visited The Boston Globe to learn about its innovative approach to paid content.

Jeff Moriarty, Vice President Digital Products, told the group about the new two-website strategy, launched a year ago. Since 1996, the publisher had been running the free Boston.com website, focused on lifestyle, sport and living in and around Boston. At the end of 2010, Forrester was brought in to help identify different user segments, and found three clear groups: print engaged users, who essentially like the print format and experience and are willing to pay, online/mobile engaged users, who dip in and out, like to curate their own content, and have some willingness to pay, and finally casual users who have no willingness to pay.

Author

Guest

Date

2012-10-12 17:02

Business Insider is planning to host more content sponsored by advertisers, including slide shows, videos, and possibly even branded blogs, reports Jason Del Ray for AdAge.

Pete Spande, who was appointed Business Insider’s first Chief Revenue Officer in March, is leading the initiative, known as “Brand Insider,” which he says will allow companies to place content that they have already created but that may be languishing in some quiet corner of the web beside the site's editorial content, and get it noticed by Business Insider's growing base of share-happy users.

“We're able to give brands the spotlight to get that content seen by a large audience,” Spande tells AdAge.

Business Insider’s Chief Operational Officer Julie Hansen senses good revenue prospects in sponsored content, and hopes that “in a couple year’s time” it will make up half of the site’s total revenue. “That would be great,” she said.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-11 15:23

Only a few days after Presstalis, France’s main newspaper distributor, narrowly escaped bankruptcy, its workers have yet again gone on strike, this time blocking all of the country’s national titles dated Wednesday, October 10 from reaching newsstands.

The Union for Books and Written Communication (SGLCE-CGT) called for Presstalis employees to stop working for 24 hours to protest against a restructuring plan, deemed “unavoidable” by Presstalis management, that is expected to involve cutting 1,250 of the company’s 2,500 jobs.

France’s distribution industry has been hit hard by an estimated 25 percent decline in kiosk sales over the last four years. Presstalis, which is in charge of delivering three quarters of France’s national press including all of the national daily newspapers, is expected to lose between 15 and 20 million Euros this year.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-10 12:09

Through gloomy economic conditions shines a rare glimmer of British sun: spending on Internet and mobile advertising in the UK rose to a record six-month high in the first half of this year to reach nearly £2.6 billion.

This represents a 12.6 percent increase from the first half of 2011, during which £2.3 billion was spent on Internet and mobile advertising.

These figures come from the latest Internet Advertising Bureau UK (IAB) Expenditure Report, published today, which is based on a survey conducted by Pricewaterhouse Coopers measuring like-for-like, year-on-year growth.*

Other key findings include:

  • Mobile ad spend more than doubled
  • Paid search advertising dominates digital ad spend across platforms
  • Online video advertising increased by nearly half

Mobile advertising

Spending on mobile advertising has continued what the report refers to as its “meteoric rise,” soaring 132 percent to £181.5 million. As we reported in March, mobile ad spend grew 157 percent from 2010 to 2011, according to IAB.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-09 16:08

Concentration and Politics Hinder Israel Newspapers, The New York Times

As one of Israel’s mainstream newspapers (Maariv) appears on the verge of closing, and another (Haaretz) faces strikes protesting its plans to lay off employees, The New York Times looked at the crisis in the country’s print media. The market has been skewed by the free national daily, Israel Hayom, introduced five years ago by a pro-government American billionaire, but the article provides an interesting summary of some of the challenges encountered by media in small-language markets.

Newspaper journalism is in crisis, The Guardian

“I loved the idea that, while I walked and talked and learned who I was, while I grew and even while I slept, great journalists were establishing the first draft of history,” writes John Tiffany in this fervent tale of his relationship with newspapers over the years. Tiffany, associate director of the National Theatre of Scotland, has put together a play, Enquirer, which aims to address the question “Are we seeing the dying days of the newspaper industry?”

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-08 18:03

The management of leading Spanish newspaper El País announced to staff on Friday a plan to lay off about 150 employees – or one third of staff – as part of a series of cutbacks to “guarantee the viability of the business in years to come.”

Other measures will include early retirement plans and salary cuts, announced Juan Luis Cebrián, President of the PRISA group and of El País, accompanied by directors of both the publishing group and the newspaper.

The managers called the cutbacks “painful” yet “inevitable,” citing a steep drop in revenue stemming from the contraction of the advertising market and reduced circulation. In the Spanish market, print advertising revenue has dropped by 53 percent and newspaper circulation by 18 percent over the last five years, directors told staff members.

“For every dollar that is made on the Internet, ten are destroyed in print,” said Cebrián. “It’s not a question of wanting to improve profitability. The newspaper can no longer support its current cost structure.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-08 17:42

The advertising industry is built on consumers’ dreams, and few things make us as starry-eyed as property.

Perhaps with this in mind, the Wall Street Journal, a newspaper with an affluent global readership, has announced the launch of “Mansion,” a weekly, stand-alone section focusing on luxury residential real estate worldwide, on October 5.

“We know our audience is already well-versed and interested in the high-end real estate market, and Mansion provides advertisers the opportunity to speak directly to that audience,” said Michael Rooney, the Journal’s Chief Revenue Officer, in the press release.

Advertisers who have already signed on to speak directly to that audience include Sotheby’s International Realty, Sub-Zero and Wolf, Coldwell Banker and Prudential Douglas.

Mansion will appear every Friday in the Journal’s U.S. print edition, with certain content also being printed in its Europe and Asia editions. It will also be available online and via the iPad/iPhone app.

Its regular features will include inside looks at prominent peoples’ homes and real estate portfolios, high-end financing advice, and guides to global real estate markets.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-03 14:22

Remember when print ads could only play video? Now they can broadcast live tweets.

One thousand copies from Time Inc. magazine Entertainment Weekly’s next print run on October 5 will contain an Internet-connected ad, embedded inside two stiff sheets of paper.

The CW Television Network is behind the promotional insert, which will use an Android-powered device with a 3G cellular radio to display looping video and a live Twitter stream (the six latest tweets posted to the @CW_Network) on a mini LCD screen.

The experiment is all about branding. “It’s important advertisers know they can come to us when they want to do something that’s new, that’s never been done before,” Rick Haskins, Executive Vice President of Marketing and Digital Programmes at The CW, told Mashable.

The ad may sound nifty on paper, but whether it heralds a renaissance in print advertising is not yet certain; the following Mashable video reveals it to be slow, silent, lacking in tactility and comparable to a singing Hallmark card.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-03 12:03

The Guardian and Tumblr will ‘live-GIF’ first presidential debate, Poynter.org / Journalism.co.uk

A Guardian reporter and four GIF-creators will be getting together tomorrow to live-blog with animated GIFs, offering a light alternative to other coverage, this article says. Will these become a common element in live blogs as technology becomes more and more sophisticated? As another Poynter article explains: More compelling than a static photo and more immediate than Web video, the animated GIF (correctly pronounced with a soft g) is a uniquely digital mode of conveying ideas and emotion.”

The New York Times debuts an HTML5 iPad web app to complement its native apps, Nieman Lab

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-02 17:53

Free newspaper Metro will continue its expansion in Latin America by launching print and online versions in Puerto Rico later this month, its parent company Metro International, headquartered in Sweden, announced today.

Metro’s presence in Puerto Rico’s capital San Juan will bring the number of Latin American countries in which Metro is handed out up to eight; the freesheet is already distributed to almost three million daily readers in the metropolitan centers of Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Peru, Guatemala and Columbia.

"Latin America has grown in importance to Metro and now accounts for over 25 percent our business," said Mikael Jenson, CEO and President of Metro International, in the release.

The Financial Times has similarly announced a “significant expansion into the Latin American market” today.

The salmon-coloured British daily is launching a digital newspaper printing site in Brazil, which as of tomorrow will begin using high-speed inkjet technology to print newspapers in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and the capital Brasilia.

The Financial Times is concurrently launching a new mobile web app for Latin America, and a Latin America homepage for its website, FT.com, both of which will prioritize content that is relevant to its growing Latin American readership. 

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-02 17:10

Time Inc finds a way to make money out of its Twitter page, The Wall

Time Inc has sold the background wallpaper of its People Style Watch Twitter page as advertising, in a move that could be easily replicated by others, this blog post suggests. It’s permitted by Twitter and could be a way for those publishers who have been wondering how to concretely monetise their millions of Twitter fans to start doing so.

The parallel universe where Mitt Romney leads all polls, Politico

Despite the fact that any “working Republican political operative” will admit that Mitt Romney is trailing Barack Obama in US presidential election polls, there is a “parallel universe” of right-leaning media determined to suggest that Romney is on the verge of a convincing victory, Politico journalists say in this article that looks at the way different polling methods can be weighted.

When the view is from somewhere, readers ought to know where that is,NYTimes Public Editor’s Journal

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-01 18:08

UPDATED on Tuesday, October 2 at 11:23 am

When it comes to reading news on a small screen, U.S. consumers lean toward web browsers, with 60 percent of tablet-wielding news consumers and 61 percent of those using smartphones now accessing mobile news mostly through the web, according to a survey published today by the Pew Research Centre.

Fewer than half as many mobile news consumers, in contrast, most often use apps; that is, 23 percent of tablet news readers and 28 percent of smartphone readers. A third category, representing 16 percent of those on tablets and 11 percent on smartphones, claims to be more or less evenly split between the two.

An Online Publishers Association survey from June 2012 corroborates the trend: it found that 41 percent of tablet users mostly accessed magazine and newspaper content through the mobile web, 30 percent through single-publication apps, and 22 percent through newsstand apps.

Moreover, this year’s Pew findings follow a pattern established in last summer's survey, by which point the browser was already more popular among news consumers than apps, but to a lesser extent: 40 percent of tablet-using respondents said they used mostly the web browser for news, 21 percent leaned toward apps, and 31 percent claimed to use both equally.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-01 16:04


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