Date

Thu - 25.05.2017


September 2012

Shrewd print and online strategies have helped New York magazine to defy the global downturn in magazine and newspaper market. In an article published by AdAge, Matthew Flamm writes that the magazine has experienced its best year in a decade, and it’s not hard to understand why. 2012 has seen the title win a flurry of awards, expand its online presence and attract national and international audiences.

It’s a story that sits at odds with the fortunes of the American magazine industry in general. The Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) reported a 10 percent decrease in magazine newsstand sales and a month ago the Publishers Information Bureau revealed that advertising has suffered an 8.8 percent year-on-year drop. Newsweek’s financial crisis may be the most extreme example of a magazine in decline, but other major magazine brands at Condé Nast, Time Inc. and others are suffering from loss of ad and circulation revenue.

So how exactly has this supposedly regional magazine managed to boost revenues and attract 4.8 million unique online users in August alone?

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-28 16:59

We are experimenting with replacing our "Media links" post with a feed of "Recommended reading," where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think — either in the comments section below this post or send an email to emma.goodman@wan-ifra.org

The newsonomics of Pricing 201, NiemanLab.org

News industry analyst Ken Doctor offers several lessons learned about what is working best for news publishers using digital subscription models. “Now, waist-deep into the digital circulation revenue revolution, we’re adding fact to hunch, data to intuition,” he writes. Among the lessons he sites: Digital can be used to reinforce print — for now; Content counts more than ever; and Setting the meter ever lower is key to creating member value — and revenue.

In Changing News Landscape, Even Television is Vulnerable, Pew Research Center

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-28 16:39

From France comes the mildly surprising news that Le Huffington Post has become the country’s premier online-only news source.

Figures released this morning by Médiamétrique/Netratings show that the site received 1.916 million unique visitors in July 2012, beating Rue 89 (1.476m unique users), one of France’s most popular websites, into second place. The rest of the rankings see Le Nouvel Observateur’s site Le Plus in third place (1.262m), Atlantico (1.258m) in fourth, fifth place taken by Slate France (966,000) and paying site Médiapart comes sixth with 578,000 unique visitors.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-27 17:21

We are experimenting with replacing our "Media links" post with a feed of "Recommended reading," where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think - either in the comments section below this post or send an email to emma.goodman@wan-ifra.org

Revolutionary press blooms underground in Syria, AFP

“Dozens” of independent grassroots newspapers and websites have emerged in Syria since the outbreak of the revolts last year, this article from AFP reports. Most are accessed online, but some are printed and distributed. Many are run by inexperienced citizen journalists who struggle for funding, but the efforts to keep people informed and fight for free expression in a country in the grips of horrific civil war are heartening. 

Google Play store hits 25 billion downloads, launches discounts, CNET.com

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-27 16:24

We are experimenting with replacing our "Media links" post with a feed of "Recommended reading," where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think - either in the comments section below this post or send an email to emma.goodman@wan-ifra.org

How journalists can turn their stories into conversations, Poynter.org

Everyone agrees engagement with readers is important and this article offers several suggestions for increasing that engagement. Likewise, it points out some reasons that current engagement might be low and what can be done about them.

Building a better sports bar: SB Nation redesigns its blog network, NiemanLab.org 

This sports blog network has just finished a redesign and tackled a number of issues that large news publishing companies face: how to modernise the site while “also unifying the look of more than 300 distinct sites. And they had to do it in a way that balances the needs of the fan communities of each site while giving the entire network a universal consistency,” writes Justin Ellis.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-27 09:53

Disappointed Parisian newspaper readers are yet again scowling in the direction of Presstalis today, as the distribution company’s striking workers have blocked a third title this week from appearing in the kiosks that dot the city’s sidewalks.

This afternoon, it is French newspaper Le Monde that can’t be found among the shelves; yesterday it was business daily Les Echos, and on the weekend Sunday title Le Journal de Dimanche was similarly absent.

Far from ruining breakfast, these repeated disruptions strike at the heart of the news distribution industry, and pose a grave threat to the country’s print newspapers.

Presstalis, the primary player in the distribution sector, is in charge of the delivery of 90 French and international dailies and 3,300 magazines to over 29,000 points of sale across France, with a high concentration in Paris, reports Newsring.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-26 16:50

If reports in this morning’s Daily Telegraph are accurate, News International’s frosty relationship with Google may be thawing.

After two self-imposed years in the wilderness, quality news titles owned by Rupert Murdoch’s British publishing division could find themselves re-included in Google search results as soon as next month.

The Times and The Sunday Times websites were originally removed from Google’s search index at the same time that paywalls were introduced at the thetimes.co.uk (then timesonline.co.uk), as part of News Int.’s attempts to stop users accessing content for free. Murdoch’s objection to consumers viewing premium content free of charge is no secret, and the media mogul hasn’t pulled any punches in his criticisms of Google’s operating policies.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 14:19

Hotly anticipated by the news media industry since it was first proposed as a rival for The Economist and The Financial Times, Atlantic Media’s new online business magazine Quartz finally went live yesterday. The launch was always going to be a closely scrutinised affair thanks to Quartz’s mobile-first, digital-only direction, and journalists have been quick to highlight the publication’s decision to shun native apps in favour of an app-like site.

A simple, uncluttered homepage greets visitors to qz.com. Rejecting the much-adhered-to practice of producing news website layouts that resemble newspaper front pages, Quartz features a single story on its main page with a bar on the left side of the screen that leads readers to "top," "latest" and "popular" stories. The navigation bar at the top of the screen is, as promised, categorised according to "phenomena," "not beats."

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-25 17:21

Driving reader engagement and loyalty is a bigger motivator for increased use of user-generated content than gathering additional content, WAN-IFRA and Finnish crowdsourcing service Scoopshot found, in a survey of editors of regional and national dailies, local papers and online-only sites that use UGC.

All respondents rated reader engagement and loyalty as a primary driver for increased editorial use of UGC, ahead of 71% who said that the uniqueness of the content provided was a driver. Just 14% said that the lower cost of the content was a motivating factor.

Photos are the most commonly used content, according to the survey, with all respondents using them. Nearly all (87%) use story tips and half use videos. About one third cited comments as a way readers contribute which they see as UGC.

UGC is most relevant on a local level, the survey found. Three-quarters of respondents see UGC as particularly suitable for local or hyperlocal news, and just over half believe it is particularly suited to community events. Other coverage areas which more than one third of editors cited were ‘sports’ and ‘accidents’.

All believed that UGC can add value to a publication, and 81.3% said that they see the importance of UGC increasing at their publication. One participant commented that although it is seldom “very” valuable, there are times when it is. 

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-25 09:24

The topic of audience measurements is of great importance to the news publishing industry in a time of multiple channel publishing. Being able to show an accurate figure of the combined reach of print, online and mobile would be most valuable. Also for WAN-IFRA this is an important issue to put on the agenda. One international forum where measurement issues for all medias are discussed soon, is the I-COM Global Summit, taking place in Rome 15-18 October.

The I-COM is an industry backed international forum for exploring Data & Measurement issues facing the Digital Marketing Industry, with the goals of showcasing meaningful innovation and working toward consensus on best practices.

The theme of Global Summit this year is ‘Big Data: Game Changing Strategies that drive your Brand’. The Big Data trend and its particular significance to Digital Marketing will be discussed and the event will also cover key Data & Measurement topics such as Social, Mobile, Multi-Screen, Advertising Effectiveness and Man vs. Machine.

WAN-IFRA members benefit from a special member price of 20% off the regular fee. Read more and register here: http://i-com.org/global-summits-2012-pricing

Author

Kristina Bürén

Date

2012-09-25 09:17

Arthur Brisbane, the former Public Editor of The New York Times, offers his thoughts and impressions on that job in an exit interview with Craig Silverman on Poynter.

On Nieman Lab, Andrew Phelps offers a first look at Spundge, a new "software to help journalists to manage real-time data streams."

The US-based Star-Tribune reports it is launching a new product this week called Radius, which offers "a new array of digital marketing services to small- and medium-sized businesses, many of whom have never advertised with the traditional newspaper."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-24 17:40

Two weeks ago when the SFN blog examined the National Readership Survey (NRS)’s report on print and online news consumption, we suggested that encouraging digital figures for quality titles could be of great interest to advertisers. Looking at the same figures, The Guardian’s Investigations Executive Editor, David Leigh, had an altogether more radical idea: a £2 pound levy on broadband services.

Thanks to the BBC’s free-to-access, taxpayer-funded news website, British news consumers will always have access to reliable, up-to-date news reports. This, Leigh argues, means that the paywall model will “never really work in the UK context.” 

The noted investigative journalist reasons, in an article posted to MediaGuardian, that the simplest and most effective means of solving the financial dilemma faced by British news publishers is a “small levy on UK broadband providers [that] could be distributed to news providers in proportion to their UK online readership.” Brits are not particularly inclined to pay for online news, Leigh continues, but almost 20 million UK households are, and will continue to be, willing to pay for essential broadband subscriptions.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-24 16:01

Pubblico, the independent Italian newspaper that launched on Tuesday, is off to a flying start. According to news website Lettera 43, the paper sold 50,000 copies of its first issue. Pubblico’s founder, journalist Luca Telese, has hailed this initial success as a victory over sceptics who thought a print-based venture was destined for failure.

On Poynter, journalism educator Kelly Fincham offers advice on "What every young journalist should know about using Twitter."

"We access news on multiple devices. Shouldn’t those devices be smart enough to connect our actions to their presentation?" Analyst Ken Doctor discusses "all-access delight" in his latest newsonomics post on Nieman Lab.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-21 18:07

As Google News prepares to celebrate its tenth birthday on 22 September, the aggregation site could find that it finally has friends in the world of journalism willing to R.S.V.P.

From the moment the search engine giant launched its news service in 2002, Google News has found itself embroiled in bitter feuds with journalists and news outlets concerned that the internet company would siphon-off readers and make money on the back of ‘stolen’ content.

Using a sophisticated algorithm to ‘harvest’ stories from 4,000 international news sites, the original incarnation of Google News produced a constantly updated index of breaking news headlines from around the world. Today the ‘Googlebot’ aggregates stories from over 50,000 news sources and is frequently the first port of call for readers chasing a particular news item or wanting a global news perspective concentrated in one location. Unveiling the Google News project for the first time, then-Google product manager Marissa Meyer announced: “From the reader perspective, this changes news reading habits, because (usually) you pick a source and pick the story that interests you. With this service, you pick the story that interests you and then pick the source.”

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-21 17:13

In the UK, the Daily Mail's website, MailOnline, has passed the 100 million unique browser mark for the first time, according to new figures released by ABC and reported by Press Gazette. The site recorded a record 105,720,020 in August 2012, which represents a 41.1 percent increase over August 2011.

Journal Register Company, which recently filed for bankruptcy, is likely to reduce print frequency at some of its 20 US daily newspapers, writes Rick Edmonds on Poynter's website.

The Guardian's Roy Greenslade reports that the number of signers to a petition "urging Sun editor Dominic Mohan to stop publishing page 3 girl pictures," has now nearly doubled in just the past couple of days to more than 23,000.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-20 17:28

America’s highest-net-worth individuals have once again been ranked by bank account in the latest Forbes 400 list, and along with the paucity of exceptionally wealthy women, one of the most startling revelations is the speed at which last year’s social media chiefs have slid down the totem pole.

Together, social media’s young masters lost US$ 11 billion in a single year, raising doubts about whether wealth generated in the hype-splashed sector has staying power.

The fortune of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg slipped the furthest. In just over three months after the social network’s widely publicized IPO “pop” in May, the company’s market value has dropped by over $50 billion dollars. Its 28-year-old founder’s net worth has dwindled by $8.1 billion to hit $9.4 billion, and his Forbes placement has fallen from 14th to 36th. In his new status, Zuckerberg is tied with another man who had a rough summer in the headlines: 81-year old Rupert Murdoch.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-20 16:51

Times are tough down under. Embattled traditional media outlets in Australia are being beaten in the struggle for advertising revenue by online media companies.

Where once classified advertisements were rivers of revenue that sustained print titles for almost two centuries, they are now more commonly found at specialist sites that are presenting a serious challenge to newspaper’s position in the advertising market.

According to the Commercial Economic Advisory Service of Australia, 2012 is the first year in which online ad spend in Australia overtook that of newspapers. The dominance of new media companies focused on the sale of classified ads online, in particular Carsales.com, recruitment site SEEK, and real-estate site REA, contributed greatly to the change, which saw the online market receive 27 per cent of the country’s total advertising dollars. Newspapers attracted 24 per cent.

Reuters reports that the shift in advertising dominance from traditional media to online companies is a relatively new phenomenon in Australia. As recently as April the value of traditional media organisations was greater than that of online companies, but in the intervening months the worth of newspaper outlets and television broadcasters plummeted.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-20 16:32

When journalist and television presenter Luca Telese acrimoniously parted ways with Il Fatto Quotidiano at the beginning of summer, he promised to create a rival newspaper “to say what many on the left think but few say”. Now, a mere three months later, that is exactly what he has done, assembling a thirty person editorial staff, replete with former Fatto journalists (seven in total), contributors from some of Italy’s most renowned national titles, and interns.

Pubblico hit Italian newsstands on Tuesday 18th September, and on first sight it would be easy to mistake it for another newspaper entirely. The graphics and logo are clearly borrowed from Libération, France’s leading left-wing paper, while the slogan “Not funded by public money” bears more than a passing resemblance to a similar declaration found on Il Fatto’s front page. The paper will be published seven days a week, in every region of Italy barring Sicily and the southern part of Calabria. Though some commentators believe the newspaper’s content might be better suited to a weekly publication, the paper is no doubt hoping that it will be in a better position to attract and maintain a loyal readership by establishing a daily reading habit amongst consumers.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-19 17:56

The Guardian has announced that Tanya Cordrey has been named to the new role of Chief Digital Officer. She is currently GNM's Director of Digital Development. In the same announcement, the company said David Pemsel, GNM's interim Chief Marketing Officer, has been promoted to the new position of Chief Commercial Officer.

The Huffington Post reports that Se & Hoer, a Danish celebrity weekly magazine, will publish the topless photos of the Duchess of Cambridge in a 16-page supplement that is sold with its Thursday edition.

Speaking of Huffington Post, an article on Mashable describes what a smash hit HuffPost Live has been in its first month on the air. To date, "HuffPost Live has aired 12 hours of original video per day, five days a week, with more than 2,000 guests appearing on air," according to the Mashable report.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-19 17:12

BBC's new director general vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it, says paidContent, while the Guardian reports on George Entwistle's plans for a "radical" shape-up at the BBC.

The editor of the Irish Daily Star has been suspended following the paper's publication of the topless duchess photos, according to Press Gazette.

While back in France where the pictures were originally published, Closer is now being sued by Dominique Strauss Kahn, says LePoint.fr.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-18 18:41

At the beginning of this week, The Guardian published its 12th annual list of the 100 most powerful people in the media industry. Covering broadcast media, newspapers and magazines, new media, marketing, advertising and PR, the Guardian Media 100 is compiled by a panel of industry insiders who take into account the economic, cultural and political influence individual media figures exert in the UK.

Unsurprisingly, given the size of their audiences and revenues, social media and technology companies dominate the top 10. Google CEO Larry Page takes pole position, reflecting his company’s attempts to move into the social networking market with Google+. Twitter’s Dick Costolo takes second place, while both Sir Jonathan Ive for Apple and Android/ Google’s Andy Rubin (third and sixth place respectively) are feted for the role they played in developing tablet products and changing the way we access information online.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-17 17:48

In a post titled "A quick note on innovation in media" on his blog, Adam Westbrook offers this advice: "The first thing to realise is that the secret is not to come up with a new idea. There is rarely such a thing. Instead, the secret is to look at a space with people, or businesses already established, and see what they’re doing wrong. Then invent something that improves on what they do."

Mario García takes a look at USA Today's new website, which he notes "combines clever design with new ideas for advertising and marketing."

In India, "HT Media's business daily, Mint has completely revamped its website (www.livemint.com) and launched an integrated newsroom that caters to print and digital platforms," reports Biprorshee Das on the afaqs! website.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-17 17:18

About half of the Chicago Tribune's local editions have been cut since the company suspended its work with Journatic, a supplier of outsourced journalism, according to a report on Poynter by Andrew Beaujon.

"If Africa wants to be taken seriously, it must generate its own content," was a theme of a panel discussion on "Broadband Africa - Opportunities for Innovation and Transformation," part of Africa Rising: The Highway Africa Conference 2012 in Association with the Global Forum for Media Development, which took place this week in Grahamstown, South Africa. While there is a lot of connectivity within Africa, there is not a lot of content being created there, one panel member noted.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-14 17:43

In a business climate of plummeting advertising and circulation revenue that has seen editorial budgets slashed, newsroom functions outsourced, legacy obligations become an ever increasing burden and print days reduced, you might be forgiven for thinking that the future of newspapers was cause for concern for editors and owners.

However, a survey conducted by the Missouri School of Journalism’s Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) has revealed remarkable levels of optimism in the newsrooms of U.S. daily newspapers – and significant faith in the power of print.

The RJI held telephone interviews with 485 news publishers and senior newspaper executives, who together represent one-third of the daily news titles in the U.S., as part of its annual Publishers Confidence Index. Full details of the report’s findings on the state of print and digital revenues, online news and mobile devices will be released in the coming months but a statement released by the RJI on 13 September attests to the ongoing importance of print publications in an industry widely thought to be preparing for a digital future.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-14 14:40


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation