Date

Wed - 28.06.2017


June 2012

How important are local newspapers? Not very, according to the organisers of the London Olympics, whose neglect of local titles wishing to cover the games led to a row that went all the way to the House of Lords. Although the matter has now been resolved, with an additional 39 passes being issued to regional papers, certain publications like the Greenwich News Shopper are still unable to report directly on an event happening on their very doorstep. It is a move that demonstrates the indifference that often greets local newspapers, an indifference born of the erroneous belief that the advent of the Internet and access to free news sources 24 hours a day has put paid to demand for newspaper reports and articles written from a local perspective.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-29 17:21

A long-form piece for the weekend: Tim de Lisle of Intelligent Life follows the "triumphs and tribulations" of the Guardian, and talks to its piano-playing Editor-in-Chief, Alan Rusbridger, in an attempt to answer its provocative headline: Can the Guardian Survive?

“Yesterday’s News Corp split announcement could spell big changes at The Times as Rupert Murdoch vowed losses would not be tolerated at any of the company’s print titles,” begins an article by Andrew Pugh on PressGazette. Murdoch reportedly said yesterday that he plans to be more "bullish" in the US than in the UK, and that “each newspaper will be expected to pay its way.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-29 15:12

News Corporation has confirmed that over the next year it will separate its publishing and entertainment companies, after rumours of an impending split began circulating earlier this week. In a memo addressed to staff Rupert Murdoch assures his employees that the decision will see News Corp. separate into “two global leaders in their own right […] as opposed to merely one.”

The new media and entertainment company will include many of News Corp.’s most lucrative interests, such as the broadcasters BskyB, Sky Italia, and Fox Broadcasting, as well as the hugely successful 20th Century Fox Film. Whilst there is little doubt that these businesses will continue to flourish, the same cannot be said of the soon-to-be-annexed newspaper titles. Debate is raging over whether removing the safety-net of profits generated by the entertainment businesses will see the company’s newspapers forced to shape-up, or if the measure will ultimately lead to widespread cost-cutting and titles being sold-off or even closed.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-28 17:36

With advances in technology come new challenges for keeping journalistic sources safe.  MediaShift offers a list of tools from Jillian C. York.

Has the legacy of Jayson Blair been forgotten already? An intern at The Wall Street Journal has been fired for fabricating sources. Andrew Beaujon reports for Poynter.

“New media companies that will succeed are founded by two kinds of people: technologists, and media people who think like technologists,” argues Christopher Mims for MIT’s Technology Review.

The BBC will soon redefine the scope of BBC Worldwide, its international commercial arm, due to growing internal friction surrounding online strategy, paidContent reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-27 16:08

The Chicago Tribune has become one of the latest major newspapers in the US to announce plans to introduce a paywall on its online site, behind which it will place “premium” content including in-depth reports and analysis, columnists and reviews.

At first glance, this may seem little different to action taken by various other news titles that have sought to maintain or increase revenue at a time when print subscriptions are diminishing. However, the Chicago Tribune is attempting to breathe new life into the process by offering its readers the opportunity to read selected articles from Forbes and The Economist as part of its new premium package. The announcement of a partnership between these three titles certainly seems to prove that Bill Adee (vice president for digital development and operations at the Chicago Tribune) and his team understand the need to offer something more than access to their usual articles and reviews in order to justify charging readers for content that was previously free to view online.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-27 16:07

Brian Bonner, Chief Editor of the Kyiv Post, will be moderating the joint World Newspaper Congress/World Editors Forum session titled "Winners shaping the future - How some newspaper companies are succeeding and leading the way" at the event in Kiev in September.

Bonner is an American journalist who has been with the English-language weekly since 2008 as its chief editor (and once before in 1999). In the USA, he worked mainly for the St. Paul Pioneer Press, the second largest newspaper in Minnesota, for more than 20 years. He also has worked for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe as an election expert and for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids in Washington, D.C., as associate director of international communications.

WAN-IFRA: The web site [http://www.kyivpost.com ] is in both English and Ukrainian/Russian. But the printed paper is in English only. Why the dichotomy?

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2012-06-27 13:57

RealWire has launched a new tool for "curating the media on Twitter." Lissted, which allows you to search for journalists and bloggers and monitor the media on Twitter, already has a database of over 10,000 journalists, and media professionals can request to be listed by filling out a form and linking their Twitter accounts. The Next Web reports.

A Dutch start-up is developing a Farmville-like Facebook game, NewsGame, that will generate original reporting (and pay for it), reports the Nieman Lab.

The late New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid’s death raises questions of how to keep journalists safe in war zones. Steve Myers from Poynter reports.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-26 17:48

The news that The New York Times will soon be publishing its entire content on Flipboard seems to signal a decisive change in the way in which traditional press and media companies engage with their audiences. From this Thursday, the entire content of the NYT will be available to subscribers, whilst non-subscribers will be able to read a limited amount of articles found in the paper’s Top News section.

The partnership with Flipboard is quite a departure from the Times's previous stance on its digital content. In the past it was necessary to have a subscription to see more than 10 NYT articles, and its digital version could only be viewed via the paper’s apps and website or by reading excerpts quoted by third parties. Explaining why a company that had previously guarded its digital content so jealously has made such a bold move, Denise F. Warren, general manager of The New York Times’s website points out that in a survey of the paper’s subscribers 20 percent of those asked used third-party aggregation apps like Flipboard. The deal still leaves the paywall system in place, but leading figures at the paper hope that allowing partial access to certain articles will encourage many who have not subscribed already to do so.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 17:27

Early on Tuesday morning rumours began to circulate of a possible restructuring within Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, which would see the company separate its entertainment businesses from its smaller section of publishing titles. The rumours are generally seen as credible, having been first published in the News Corp-owned Wall Street Journal. Though the company’s representatives are so far refusing to confirm or deny reports outright, BBC Business editor Robert Preston has been told by a News Corps insider that the company has “nothing to add to [the] WSJ piece”.

The idea of dividing News Corp into two separate organisations is not a new one, having first been suggested several years ago, but until now Murdoch had always rejected such a move. The media mogul seems to have a sentimental attachment to newspapers, that until the 1980s were the nucleus of News Corporation. However, the recent scandals that have engulfed Murdoch-owned titles such as the former News of the World have led shareholders to see splitting the company as an ideal way to protect the company’s film and television interests, including the Fox Broadcasting Network and British Sky Broadcasting, from the problems besieging the company’s UK newspaper titles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 14:13

Clay Shirky for Nieman Lab on Gawker's method of managing comments to make sure the best ones rise to the surface.

The evolution of WordPress from a simple blogging platform and open source project to a content management system, and finally to a Paas (Platform as a Service), according to Adii Pienaar, the CEO and co-founder of WooThemes, one of the largest theme and infrastructure providers for WordPress sites, for GigaOM.

The Independent’s publisher is considering locating all of its titles (the Independent, i, the Independent on Sunday and the Evening Standard) on a single floor in its current base in London’s Kensignton, which is already “bulging at the seams,” and encouraging journalists to work from home, as radical cost-cutting measures. Roy Greenslade reports for the Guardian.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-25 17:51

In the wake of the events that lead to the on-going Leveson inquiry into press practices, one news organisation is attempting to prove that investigative journalism can be both ethical and capable of generating a profit. Conceived by Mark Watts, current Editor-in-Chief, PR executive Tim Pendry and media finance specialist David Baxter, Exaronews.com is a subscription-based site that aims to eschew the “churnalism” that it claims dominates mainstream media outlets in favour of the rigorous investigative practices used by journalists of old. In the relatively short amount of time that has passed since the site’s launch in October 2011, Exaro has uncovered numerous scandals, including the widespread tax avoidance practiced by civil servants, which have subsequently been picked up by larger titles, including the Sunday Times and the Daily Mail.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-25 17:10

Meet the 25 most dangerous people in financial media (in a good way), according to the Huffington Post.

No longer lone wolves with lenses, photojournalists are increasingly traveling in packs, writes James Estrin for The New York TimesLens Blog.

The “Surface” - Microsoft's tablet – was introduced yesterday, reports The New York TimesMashable’s Lance Ulanoff evaluates.

British journalists not covered by the Press Complaints Commission could lose their right to press cards, reports the Guardian.

Regional UK newspaper publisher Johnston Press announces more job cuts in Yorkshire and the Midlands, reports Andrew Pugh of PressGazette.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-19 18:09

On the eve of the second round of legislative elections in France, and two weeks before the end of his tenure, the editor-in-chief for the French division of the Agence France Presse (AFP) news agency announced his defection to a German-brewed rival-in-the-making, reported French newspaper Le Monde.

Due to step down as editor-in-chief for France and take up another position within the agency at the end of the month, Jean-Luc Testault revealed his plans on Friday to leave AFP for a new French competitor being formed by Germany’s DAPD.

Germany’s second-largest news agency, DAPD has been building up a presence in France over the past year, and is allegedly seeking to launch a French generalist, multimedia news agency under the name Sipa News in October, that would compete directly with AFP, according to Le Monde.

Founded upon the German branch of the US news agency Associated Press (AP) and a former East German agency, and owned by businessmen Martin Vorderwülbecke and Peter Löw, DAPD began its French shopping spree with the purchase of Sipa Presse, a French photo agency, in July 2011.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-18 17:34

What do a YouTube video satirising Pakistan’s army, an article criticising the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development, and a video of a Canadian citizen peeing on his passport have in common? They were all the objects of government requests to remove content from Google sites during the second half of 2011, says Google.

The company has just released its latest round of data, documenting demands made by governments to remove content from its sites or to turn over information about its users. Google, which began publishing this data as part of its Transparency Report in 2010, expressed concern as it noted that, for the fifth six-month period in a row, it has received requests from governments to remove political content. What’s more, the demands didn’t just come from countries with a traditionally poor press freedom record, but from Western democracies too.

“Unfortunately, what we’ve seen over the past couple years has been troubling, and today is no different,” wrote Google’s Senior Policy Analyst Dorothy Chou in a blog post about the data. “It’s alarming not only because free expression is at risk, but because some of these requests come from countries you might not suspect—Western democracies not typically associated with censorship.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-18 15:22

"Fairfax of the Future"

  • 1,900 jobs to be cut over the next 3 years
  • 300 jobs to be shed in Metro division over 2-3 months
  • 2 Metro dailies to shrink to tabloid size on March 4, 2013
  • Digital paywalls to be introduced in 2013
  • 2 printing presses to be shut down by June 2014
  • Expected annual savings of $235 million by 2015

Fairfax is today announcing fundamental changes to the way we do business,” reads the memo that one of Australia’s largest media companies lodged with the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) on Monday, sending shockwaves through the press.

The changes, which include the elimination of 1,900 jobs over the next three years, are expected to reduce costs by $235 million over the same period, and to provide Fairfax with the flexibility to shift toward a “digital-only model if that is what is required in the future,” says the document, entitled “Fairfax of the Future.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-18 12:20

Nearly 50 media outlets and media advocacy groups signed a letter on Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to allow live news coverage inside its walls for the first time during the decision on President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, reports AP via the Huffington Post. Check out The New York Times’ interactive feature on the Supreme Court decision, expected to take place later this month.

Seven judges of Britain's Supreme Court dismissed as "without merit" Wikileaks founder Julian Assange's "last attempt" at appealing against extradition to Sweden over alleged sex crimes, reports the BBC. Extradition proceedings are due to begin after a two-week grace period.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-15 16:51

Time Inc., the largest magazine company in the United States, has stopped resisting Apple. Striking a deal similar to that signed by its major competitors a year ago, the Time Warner-owned publisher agreed on Wednesday to sell subscriptions to all 20 of its titles, which include high-circulation weeklies such as Time, People and Sports Illustrated, through the Newsstand section of Apple’s iOS App Store.

The decision represents a considerable change of heart for a publisher that was “once the magazine industry’s most ardent opponent of selling subscriptions through Apple,” according to Amy Chozick of the New York Times.

Until now, Time Inc.’s readers have only been able to access single issues of the iPad editions of its magazines through the Newsstand app, with print subscribers alone receiving regular automatic uploads.

Time Inc.’s recalcitrance toward Apple since the launch of Newsstand last fall was motivated in part by the hard bargain that the technology giant drives with publishers. Beyond the profit share arrangement whereby Apple demands a contentious 30% commission on subscriptions purchased through its Newsstand, Apple’s previous unwillingness to share the personal information of iOS magazine subscribers with publishers was a deal-breaker for Time Inc.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-15 13:36

ICANN, the non-profit organisation responsible for controlling the Internet address system, has released the names of everyone who has applied for new domains, which have become available as part of a program designed to increase competition online.

ICANN writes that, although there are currently hundreds of country-specific domains being used, there are just 22 “generics” in operation, such as .com or .org.

This is changing now, as ICANN called for applications for new domains earlier this year. Reuters describes the initiative as a push to “break the near-monopoly of the .com top-level domain.”

When the chance to apply closed at the end of May, a total of 1,930 applications had been received. ICANN has now released the names of the bidders, which include several new organisations. As Poynter reports, the Guardian, the BBC, HBO and FOX are just some of the media companies that have applied for the new domains.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-14 17:54

British Prime Minister David Cameron appeared before the Leveson Inquiry today to answer questions about his relationship with the press. The Guardian has detailed coverage.

Journalism.co.uk reports that the Times has launched an “experimental Tumblr page” for its Opinion section, which will offer “a flavour of what our columnists and leader writers do,” outside of the Times’s strict paywall.

Jonathan Stray has published a piece for Nieman Lab arguing that, in the modern media environment, we need new, better models for crime reporting. Stray has also led a Twitter discussion about how journalists can cover crime, and has collected the results together in a Storify at the bottom of the article.

The Guardian’s Roy Greenslade reports that ELLE is planning to produce an issue edited entirely by interns. The magazine launched a competition two weeks ago to find young people to fill 10 editorial roles for its October edition, and has received just under 400 applications, writes Greenslade.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-14 15:58

MediaStorm,  an online documentary multimedia producer that used to offer its content for free, has launched a "Pay Per Story" model. While unveiling two new films (A Shadow Remains and Rite of Passage) Executive Producer Brian Storm explains why the site is now charging $1.99 for access to a story.

At the intersection of “the side of light in the newsroom” and the “more lucrative shadowland of PR,” Press Gazette guest poster Martin MacConnol, CEO of content marketing agency Wardour, urges journalists to consider a sector in growth.

With the release of Apple’s iOS 6 update, anticipated later this year, the lives of Mac-using on-the-go bloggers will improve; the update will allow users to upload media to WordPress blogs from their iPhones, iPads or iPod touches. “For bloggers and image sharers, the tiny upgrade is a game changer,” says Matt Brian of The Next Web.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-13 17:08

Not content with a soon-to-be-launched video streaming network and a host of new European editions, the Huffington Post is releasing a new weekly iPad magazine tomorrow named “Huffington.

The New York Times previews the new publication, noting that some content will be pulled from huffingtonpost.com, but other articles will also be “new and separate from that of the rest of the site”. The magazine, which is only available though the Apple store, will feature a mix of long-form pieces (of between 4,000 and 8,000 words), photos, commentary, reviews, illustrations, videos and data visualisations.

“From the beginning we wanted to do something that felt like a print magazine," says Huffington’s creative director Josh Klenert (formerly of Billboard), quoted by Joe Pompeo at Capital New York.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-13 17:07

As news organisations go digital, asking what kind of information people will pay for online is the new industry’s million-dollar question – or indeed multi-billion dollar question. Many in the business say that it is an uphill struggle to get people to pay for information itself, when it flows so freely online. Instead many media outfits focus on selling analysis, packaging and a good user experience.

The big exception is that users and businesses are willing to pay for financial information. As paidContent noted earlier this month, Bloomberg sells financial data to around 300,000 global customers for about $20,000 a year each.

Now GigaOm has profiled a Swedish start-up that is also making big bucks (although not on the same scale as Bloomberg) from selling business information. Mancx describes itself as a platform for “Business answers you can’t get anywhere else”.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-12 17:10

The Guardian correspondent in Athens, Jon Henley, reports that former journalists from Greece’s second-largest paper Eleftherotypia – which, due to lack of money, has only published two editions since December last year – are returning to work unpaid to put out third special edition of the paper, which will be published the day before the country’s general election. Henley writes that this could well be the paper’s final edition, and notes that former Eleftherotypia journalists have not been paid since August 2011.

AFP writes that former British prime minister John Major has directly contradicted Rupert Murdoch’s assertion before the Leveson Inquiry that he had "never asked a prime minister for anything." John Major told the inquiry today that, during a dinner in 1997, Murdoch had demanded Major change his policy on Europe, reports AFP.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-12 16:19

Lekiosk, a French iOS app that offers bundle deals on magazine subscriptions, makes its UK début today.

Michael Philippe, 25, one of the start-up’s quartet of young founders (the company's CEO, Ari Assuied, is the eldest at 33), said in an interview with WAN-IFRA this afternoon that publishers including the BBC, Condé Nast, IPC Media and Dennis had already signed on, giving British consumers an initial 100 titles to choose from, such as Vogue, Wired UK, and Marie Claire. “We’re fairly confident that by the end of the year we’ll have close to 200 titles on the platform,” he said, calling it “a very good start.”

The French app, originally called Lekiosque, has been downloaded half a million times since its launch in January 2011. The idea was born in 2007, while Philippe was still in university. Frustrated by his inability to get his hands on a copy of French magazine Le Point while doing an internship in New York, he called his brother and best friend in Paris, and they came up with the idea of reproducing a French newsstand anywhere in the world.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-11 17:48


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