Date

Thu - 17.08.2017


April 2012

The Columbia Journalism Review has published a report on systems for self-regulation of the press in Scandinavia, concluding that “the Scandinavian press council model is healthy, effective, and held in high regard” as asking whether it could be applied in other countries. 

Mathew Ingram at GigaOm uses Reuter’s blogger Felix Salmon’s recent suggestion that The New York Times could sell early access to its scoops as a jumping off point to ask what the purpose of a newspaper is in the digital age. “Is private access in conflict with the public interest?” he asks.

The BBC is facing increasing threat of strike action, which will coincide with the Queen's diamond jubilee celebrations, as a result of a pay dispute, writes the Guardian. The paper reports that, union representatives have called the 1% annual pay offer made by BBC managers “derisory.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-30 16:08

Die Zeit’s paper and online editions are better off as independent entities, said Wolfgang Blau, editor of Zeit Online. The weekly print paper is run out of Hamburg, while the website is based in Berlin. Blau was speaking at the International Journalism Festival in Perugia, Italy, on a panel on the future of weeklies.

Many European newspapers are moving towards a more integrated structure, but Blau argued that the culture and reporting structures are different in print and online, and hence it makes sense to keep them somewhat separate, although of course with collaboration between the two. As the paper’s circulation is growing and revenue is still going up, the approach seems to be working for Die Zeit.

One third of Die Zeit's editors frequently contribute articles written exlusively for Zeit Online, Blau said, a number which is much higher than at the paper’s competitors. The Economist’s website, for example, is full of content produced by the print journalists, who embrace the opportunity to write blog posts and more, said the paper’s social media editor Mark Johnson.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-30 11:26

A recent study from the University of Texas suggests that trying to determine who will pay for news online is more complex than finding out what sort of news is popular, reports Nieman Lab. The article explains that, confusingly, “consumers don’t always use what they prefer, and they’re not always willing to spend money on what they use.”

In the wake of Rupert Murdoch’s appearance before the Leveson inquiry, Jeff Sonderman at Poynter summarises a debate about whether constant live-tweeting of important events helps or hinders journalism.

PBS Mediashift has published an article arguing that news companies can benefit from frictionless sharing, but that it often rubs users the wrong way.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 17:40

Invoices, invoices everywhere, and not a drop of income… Being a freelance reporter has always been hard, and in the current media climate, as editorial budgets are being cut, it’s only getting tougher.

But now the former New York Press and Forbes Traveler editor Jeff Koyen is preparing to launch a platform named Assignmint, which is supposed to make freelancers lives a little easier. According to a write-up by Fast Company, Koyen’s product aims to make the admin side of freelance journalism more efficient, by offering a platform that allows writers and employers to manage commissions, deadlines, invoices, pitches, payment, expenses and contract information all in a single digital space. The platform will also feature an algorithm that will match up freelancers with potential employers, states the article.

Fast Company quotes Koyen, who explains Assignment is meant to eliminate specific, out-dated practices that he came across while working as a magazine editor. “Editors still cut-and-paste job details between Word docs and freelancers still put contracts in the mail. (Some even faxed them.),” said Koyen, “These inefficiencies do more than just waste time: They pit freelancers against their employers. So, I decided to build a network that solves all of these problems, from pitch to payment.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 17:02

Why would a company pay a newspaper for advertising, when it can broadcast directly to its audience online? The question has long been perplexing newspaper companies, who are seeing their revenues drop as a consequence of brands cutting them out of the advertising process and going straight to Twitter or Facebook to reach their customers.  

But instead of fighting the shift, the New York Times Company launched a new advertising initiative yesterday, which aims to benefit from the fact that brands are becoming their own publishers. Ricochet, as the Times’s product is called, hopes to generate revenue by allowing brands to select specific New York Times content that is relevant to their customers, and then to share links to a version of that content surrounded by their own advertising.

“In the traditional advertising model, brands reach audiences through content; by contrast, using Ricochet, content reaches audiences through brands," explains the vice president of research and development at the Times, Michael Zimbalist, quoted in the official press release.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-27 14:37

The Guardian reports that Honduran television presenter Noel Alexander Valladares was killed by gunfire, along with his brother and bodyguard. Valladares is the third journalist killed in Honduras this year alone.

According to Mail & Guardian Online, the Press Freedom Commission in South Africa has released a set of recommendations for new regulations of the press, including hierarchical penalties for "journalistic infractions." The report, which is the product of eight months of research, also proposes a system of "independent co-regulation" of the press, the article says.

Vogue's controversial article about the wife of Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad is no longer accessible on the internet, The Washington Post reports. The profile, which placed Asma al-Assad in a glamorous light just before her husband's regime began attacking its own citizens, garned a great deal of criticism when it was published.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 17:30

Many people see tech giants as the death of journalism. For one thing, they suck up much of the ad revenue that used to go to newspapers. For another, they make users accustomed to being given content for free. But rather than killing the news, are big digital players like Google simply forcing it to be reinvented?

This is what Robert Andrews suggests in an article, published today by paidContent, which covers a meeting of Paley Center’s international council of media executives in Madrid. Andrews quotes the head of news products and Google+ programming at Google, Richard Gingras, and Facebook’s journalism manager Vadim Lavrusik, who both presented the media executives with ways that journalism would be reformed with technology.

Among the points that Gingras made, was that technology was upending the traditional story form. “There will be a day – and it should not be far from now – where we can create persistent forms of stories not written in narrative form but in (Google) Fusion Tables and query strings, status updates and tweets,” said Gingras, quoted by Andrews.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-26 16:42

According to Google, the question that businesses should be asking isn’t whether or not to invest in mobile, but how. And Google is right there to provide the answers with the release of The Mobile Playbook, Mashable reports.

Coauthored by Google’s Head of Mobile Sales and Strategy Jason Spero and Senior Product Marketing Manager for Mobile Ads Johanna Werther, The Mobile Playbook: The Busy Executive’s Guide to Winning with Mobile asks “five crucial mobile questions” that business executives should explore: How does mobile change our value proposition? How does mobile impact our digital destinations? How is our organization adapting to mobile? How should our marketing adapt to mobile? How can we connect with our tablet audience?

Addressing each question, the Playbook also offers several strategies that businesses can use to understand their mobile potential, including using focus groups and surveys to get a sense of their audiences’ mobile habits. Additionally, the guide features case studies of various companies that have been using mobile technology successfully.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-26 16:32

As the fallout continues over allegations of phone hacking and corruption at News International, Rupert Murdoch appeared before the Leveson Inquiry today to answer questions about his personal relationship with politicians and the political influence wielded by his UK newspapers.

Under the intense gaze of international media outlets, Murdoch told the inquiry that he had never used the reporting from his papers as a way to further his business interests. "I have never asked a prime minister for anything," Murdoch told the inquiry, also stating, "I take a particularly strong pride that we have never pushed our commercial interests in our newspapers."

With questions scrutinising his relationships with UK Prime Ministers as far back as Margaret Thatcher, the inquiry sought to establish whether the media mogul had undue political influence in the UK. Murdoch downplayed his political pull, saying for example that, “I met Mr. Blair, if you look at the record, an average of two, maybe three times in the same year.” He also stressed, "I, in 10 years he was in power, never asked Mr Blair for anything, nor did I receive any favours."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 17:52

In light of Rupert Murdoch's testimony for the Leveson Inquiry today, Mashable examined how three news organizations, The Guardian, Pro Publica, and BBC, have been using digital technology to report on the investigation into the News of the World hacking scandal. Some of the tools used include interactive timelines and live broadcasts of the trial.

Poynter reports that The McClatchy Co. lost $2.1 million in its first quarter, a loss in revenue of 5.1%.  Advertising revenue also fell 6.8%, the article said.

Bradley Manning, the alleged WikiLeaks source, is contending that the case against him should be dropped due to the government's witholding of evidence, Reuters reported. If convicted, Manning may be sentenced to life in prison for leaking classified US documents.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-25 16:55

Paywall, begone—for a limited time, that is. Starting this past Monday and lasting until May 6, The Boston Globe is offering readers a free trial of all of its online content on BostonGlobe.com to show off its new elements and try to gain some new subscribers in the process, paidContent reported.

By entering their email addresses, users will have complete access to online content, including the downloadable ePaper version of The Boston Globe, the article said. The free trial, which also includes a deal in which users can subscribe online for $0.99 for the first eight weeks, is sponsored by Coldwell Banker, according to the Globe website.

Peter Doucette, Globe Executive Director of Circulation Sales and Marketing, told paidContent, “The impetus for the free trial is getting the word out on new features, including the Boston Globe ePaper.”

As we previously reported, The Boston Globe launched its ePaper version, a replica of the print edition that can be read on laptops, mobiles, and tablets, in March. The replica edition comes equipped with several new features, including a text-to-speech option with audio-recorded sections of the paper.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-25 12:26

We've put together a Storify of some of the best video clips from Digital Media Europe 2012, which took place in London from the 16th - 18th April.

Follow the link below to take a look.

[View the story "What should publishers be doing with digital?" on Storify]

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 12:20

The lawyer representing Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old US soldier accused of having leaked a massive trove of classified documents to WikiLeaks, has said that his trial is being endangered by the US government’s lack of transparency and by failures on the part of the prosecution.

The Courthouse News Service reported yesterday that Manning’s attorney David Coombs has condemned "a cataclysmic failing of the government to understand all aspects of the discovery process."

According to the article, Coombs has complained of the prosecution first refusing to share certain evidence with the defence on the grounds that it was classified, only to reverse its statements within a matter of days. Coombs has also implied that government prosecutors have made mistakes with the legal process, and have failed demonstrated full knowledge of their legal obligations.

The Courthouse News Service reports that in Coomb’s memo “nearly every line of text quoting a government memo or email has been blacked out in redactions”. The article points out that the information that has been withheld reflects “the intense secrecy surrounding the case”.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 09:51

The Financial Times HTML5 app has reached more than 2 million users after launching 10 months ago, The Guardian reported. The web app, which users can access on a tablet internet browser, was created to bypass Apple's policies regarding subscriber information garnered through native apps.

The Wall Street Journal launched a new platform for on-the-go readers which allows for continuous streaming of data, according to Nieman Journalism Lab. The platform, called Markets Pulse, will feature a combination of articles, tweets, photos, and videos related to financial markets.

Poynter discusses eight tactics that news organizations can use to reach young readers, including hiring more young people who better reflect the targeted audience and being careful not to alienate young readers with strong paywalls. Read the rest of the strategies here. 

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 16:38

“Three-quarters of the world’s top 100 largest newspapers are published in Asia,” said Jacob Mathew, President of the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers, at WAN-IFRA’s Publish Asia conference, held earlier this month in Bali. “Print circulations are growing, a fact that is not easily explained away by those who insist on predicting the death of newspapers. Millions of Asians turn to their daily paper as their primary trusted source of news and information.”

Mathew, who is also the executive editor and publisher of the Malayala Manorama Group in India, was just one of the speakers at WAN-IFRA’s 12th annual Asia conference to address the question of why Asian newspapers are continuing to grow, even as print declines in other regions.

Participants, including Chua Wee Phong, Executive Vice President of Circulation for Singapore Press Holdings, Jack Matthew, CEO of Fairfax Metro Media in Australia and Azrul Ananda, Director of Jawa Pos in Indonesia, focused on a number of factors, including the success of many Asian companies in protecting print revenues and then reinvesting the funds in digital expansion.

A full summary of the conference is available to WAN-IFRA members here.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-24 13:55

Not all paywalls are created equal: RR Donnelly’s Press+ announced yesterday that it would extend a grandfather clause to Google One Pass subscribers after Google closed its paid content platform on Friday, according to a press release.

Press+, a metered paywall platform which launched in 2009, currently has over 300 publications on its service, including newspapers from McClatchy and Tribune Co., as we previously reported. With the Press+ model, publishers allow users on average access to 5-15 articles per month, after which users must subscribe in order to view content. 

“We will maintain subscriber accounts for whichever publishers might have signed on with Google without charging our usual revenue share,” said Press+ cofounder Steven Brill in the press release. “We’ll only charge for all the new customers we generate going forward once our seamless transition is completed.”

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 11:43

It’s easy to find pessimistic statements about the impossibility of traditional newspapers making real money from online news. But the gloom isn’t everywhere. Mail Online’s publisher Martin Clarke told investors last Wednesday that the newspaper website is expecting to become profitable for the first time this year.

According to paidContent, Clarke stated that the site expects to break even this year, with revenues of £25m. This figure is expected to rise to £45m in 2013 and £100m within the next five years. Clarke shares these projections despite the fact that, last November, Martin Morgan, CEO of Mail Online’s parent company DGMT, said that “profitability on a meaningful scale is not going to be until 2013 or so,” according to paidContent.  

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-23 16:57

The Guardian announced today on its Developer Blog that the paper is launching the Miso Project, an open source toolkit which will help make the creation of infographics and interactive content a lot easier and faster. The first part of the project is the release of Dataset, a Javascript library.

TechDirt reported that search engine Meltwater attacked the Associated Press' lawsuit against its tracking news service as a "misuse" of copyright law. Read the rest of Meltwater's statement here.

Patrick B. Pexton of The Washington Post highlights the dangers of blogging and aggregation by examining Elizabeth Flock's blog errors and ultimate resignation, suggesting that the Post itself gave her little guidance and failed in its obligation to train her. Flock resigned after publishing a story about Mars life without citing the publisher of the original article, Discovery News, as a source.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-23 16:39

The Chinese Communist party newspaper People’s Daily has raised 1.4 billion yuan ($219 - $222 million) after filing an Initial Public Offering (IPO) for its website www.people.com.cn. As The Financial Times reported on Friday, this figure is almost three times the paper’s initial target of 527m yuan. The FT writes that people.com.cn now has a market capitalisation of $876m – rivalling that of The New York Times, which is valued at $943m.

The FT suggests that the Chinese authorities are hoping that the IPO will help state media expand their global influence. The financial paper points out that although state Chinese media have been commercially successful, tehy is vastly overshadowed by private Chinese digital companies like Sina and Tecent. Now, however, the Chinese state media seem to be looking to compete more aggressively. The FT quotes People’s Daily, which states, “we need to increase our popularity, expand the range of products and services we offer, reach a wider audience and increase page hits per visitor.” With the apparent aim of expanding its editorial impact, Chinese state television is also constructing a broadcasting centre in Washington, notes The FT.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-23 13:25

Chicago Tribune reporter Rex W. Huppke wrote a satirical obituary for facts (cause of death: Rep. Allen West's assertion that 81 Democrats in the US House of Representatives are Communists). Read the story behind the op-ed piece Facts, 360 B.C.- A.D. 2012 on Jim Romenesko's blog.

Bobbie Johnson from GigaOm takes a look at Norwegian tabloid Dagbladet's online video player that "collects seven different video feeds and allows website visitors to easily flip between coverage from inside the courtroom, the courthouse, background interviews and commentary on the street or from pundits in the newspaper’s own studio."

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-20 17:24

Gavin O’Reilly has resigned from his position as group CEO of Independent News & Media, it was widely reported today. According to the Guardian, he has had a long-running dispute with the company’s biggest shareholder, Denis O’Brien, who has a 22% stake in the company, compared to the O’Reilly family’s 13%.

“After 19 eventful years with the company, it is time for me to pursue new opportunities. It had become clear that recent and public shareholder tensions were proving an unnecessary distraction for both me and the company and this was not in the best interests of the company," O'Reilly is quoted in the Irish Independent as saying.

Sir Anthony O’Reilly, Gavin’s father, acquired the Irish Independent in 1973 and as CCO he built up an international newspaper group with papers in the UK, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

Gavin O’Reilly took over as CEO in May 2009, as part of a deal with O’Brien to change the company’s strategy. INM’s London-based papers, the Independent and Independent on Sunday, both loss-making, were sold to Alexander Lebedev in early 2010 to reduce the company’s massive debt.

O’Reilly will be replace by Vincent Crowley, chief operations officer of the group.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-20 16:11

The Sun's royal editor was arrested this morning as part of Scotland Yard's investigations into corrupt payments made by journalists to police and public officials, reports Press Gazette. The publication states that the arrests were made based on evidence provided by the controversial Management and Standards Committee, which was set up by News Corp to investigate allegations of wrong-doing in the wake of the News of the World phone-hacking scandal.

Also according to Press Gazette, Google is funding a project intended to help news entrepreneurs in Europe get ahead in the industry. The University of Lancaster’s Media and Digital Enterprise initiative (MADE) is now accepting applicants for a weekend of intensive media classes for 30 aspiring news entrepreneurs.

Jim Romenesko has published a list of the total pay received by executives at nine different US newspaper companies in 2011. The sums range between $2.9 million and $25 million, and at some companies rose by over 35%.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 17:45

Storify, the popular curation tool that allows users to create stories by pulling together elements from Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Instagram and other social networks, has announced that it has struck its first syndication deal, with the news app Pulse as its partner.

A selection of Storify’s feeds will now be available on the popular newsreader app, which allows users to select a number of news organisations, blogs and social networks, and see their latest content collected within a single display.  According to TechCrunch, Storify’s co-founder Burt Herman says that Pulse will start by making just nine Storify feeds available, but this number may be expanded based on the response from users.

TechCrunch quotes Herman, who clarifies that “Pulse users can follow certain select user accounts that have been doing great work with Storify, including The Washington Post, Al Jazeera and the White House.” He explains further: “We’re also offering our own Storify Featured Stories feed as a channel, where we curate the day’s best stories created across the platform – the same stories that are also featured daily on our own homepage.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 17:25

Tumblr is planning to allow brands to promote themselves by buying a spot on its Radar feature, wrote GigaOm yesterday. The site’s founder David Karp, who is quoted in the article, explains that the change is “about making Tumblr much more accessible to brands.” The move should help Tumblr, which has been booming in recent months, profit from its ever-growing audience.  

GigaOm explains that Radar, part of the Tumblr dashboard that highlights editorially-curated posts, currently features around 15 posts a day, and receives about 120 million daily impressions. This is an audience that advertisers will be able to tap into directly into starting May 2.

The new feature, like promoted Tweets on Twitter, allows Tumblr to monetize an organic part of its site, rather than selling display advertising. This means that Tumblr will be able to make money, and brands will be able to integrate themselves into every-day users’ social experience. Karp, quoted by GigaOm, touts the power of the new ads, suggesting that Tumblr’s flexible format will allow brands to unleash their creativity, rather than constraining them to short phrases like Twitter.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 14:41


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