Date

Wed - 29.03.2017


March 2012

The Wall Street Journal reports that Google will soon start selling its own Android-powered tablets. Google previously tried to capture the smartphone market with the Nexus One.

The Economist announced that it has officially reached 1 million fans on Facebook, journalism.co.uk reported.

POLITICO will be joining The Charlotte Observer in the creation of a daily newspaper that will cover the Democratic National Convention this September, according to its website. For the 2008 convention, POLITICO teamed up with The Denver Post and the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

The European Journalism Centre reported that a documentary titled 18DaysinEgypt, co-founded by American documentary filmmaker and journalist Jigar Mehta, features crowd-sourced material of the revolution in Egypt.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 16:39

Gazeta Wyborcza is not only Poland’s leading national daily; it also has 20 local editions and staff around the country. Those editions included sports sections – both in print and online – but they weren’t working.

“Before we developed Sport.pl/local, no sport section had traffic of more than 100,000 page views per month. There were no digital revenues. Seventy per cent of content came from the print section,” says Marcin Gadzinski, Head of Development for Sport.pl, which replaced the local websites to great success.

The reason it worked? Gazeta Wyborcza recognised that other newspapers were no longer their main competition for sport.

For more on this story, please see our Sports News Conference Blog

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-03-30 15:25

According to a new report by the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), paid digital magazine circulation rose to 3.29 million in the second half of 2011, up from 1.46 million the year before, AdAge reported. Print still accounts for most paid magazine circulation however, with digital comprising one percent of total circulation, the article said.

The report shows that paid circulation for magazines came mostly from sponsored circulation (circulation paid for by businesses for promotional reasons) with individually paid circulation often comprising only a quarter of magazines’ digital circulation, AdAge said.

According to Hearst Magazines’ executive vice president and general manager John Loughlin, however, Hearst’s individually paid digital circulation is growing and may reach one million by the end of the year without the help of sponsored circulation, the article said. Hearst titles include Esquire, Woman’s Day and Harper’s Bazaar

“Part of the good news here is that paid digital for us is growing very quickly,” Loughlin said in an interview with AdAge.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 12:54

Former editor and publisher of the Rocky Mountain News John Temple was named the new managing editor of The Washington Post, Politico reported. Temple will also serve as senior digital editor.

According to Adweek, Google announced a "microsurvey" option for publishers to use to earn advertising revenue instead of blocking online content with a paywall.

The Center for Investigative Reporting and The Bay Citizen of the San Francisco Bay area announced their merger on Tuesday, Poynter reported.

Journalism.co.uk explains how journalists can use the Timeline program for digital storytelling. Read all of the tips here.

Michael Wolff at the Guardian delves into the difficulties news organisations are having in generating mobile ad revenue.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 17:20

When The Journalism Foundation was founded last December in the UK as a charitable organisation promising to promote a free and independent press, it stated that one of its first projects would be to support the Stoke-On-Trent based local politics website Pits n Pots.

Now, almost four months later, the redesigned Pits n Pots website has been launched, with a statement from The Journalism Foundation’s chief executive Simon Kelner that it should “increase the reach and relevance of Pits n Pots to the people of the area”.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-29 17:01

According to a report released by analytics company Distimo, the top 100 best-selling apps in Apple’s Newsstand for iPad garner about $70,000 per day, minonline.com reported

Newsstand, which organizes subscription-based apps for digital newspapers and magazines into a virtual newsstand on the iPad, launched six months ago and accounts for over 7% of the 200 top-selling apps in the app store, minonline said. Games still account for 50% of all top-selling apps, the report said.

Distimo app rankings

The top five best-selling Newsstand apps in February were The Daily, NY Times for iPad, The New Yorker, National Geographic and Cosmopolitan, the article said.

According to gigaom.com, subscription newspapers and magazines sign on with Apple’s Newsstand to be incorporated into the program. The app store also has a “News” category where other publications can be found.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 13:43

To paywall or not to paywall? That seems to be the most prominent question in the sphere online news publishing these days. In the discussions on the topic, the lines appear to be clearly drawn: on the one side are newspapers such as the New York Times or the Financial Times, which charge for their online content either immediately or after accessing a certain number of articles. On the other side are papers such as the Guardian, which believe that an “open” approach, more akin to the nature of the Internet, will eventually yield solid revenue.

The drawback of this way of thinking about digital publishing is that it may put too much emphasis on the question of paywall, whereas a different angle could be more helpful. GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram makes this point in a recent article, arguing that rather than defining the relationship with their readers through money, newspapers should focus on the relationship they have with their readers. When developed more fully, this relationship would then form the basis that could be monetised.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2012-03-28 18:16

Two Brazilian journalists, the owner of Costa Oeste newspaper Onei de Moura and radio reporter Divino Aparecido Carvalho, were shot and killed last weekend near the Paraguay border, The Guardian reports.

After having been purchased by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, The New Republic announced on its blog that new articles on the website will no longer be blocked by its paywall, according to the Atlantic Wire.

Steve Buttry of The Buttry Diary blog asked several engagement editors, or social media editors, to explain their roles in the newsroom and how they try reach their audiences. Read their responses here

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 17:36

The Boston Globe announced yesterday that it was following in the footsteps of other newspapers and launching an ePaper edition for online and print subscribers, according to boston.com. The ePaper version, which mirrors the format of the print paper, can be read on a laptop or downloaded as an app for smartphones and tablets, the article said.

The “replica edition” contains additional digital features such as page-turning, navigation scrolling and bookmarking, the article said. The new version also features a “text-to-speech” option, which can read selected articles or the entire newspaper aloud.

According to the description from the iTunes app store, users can choose a setting in which Apple Newsstand automatically downloads the paper daily, just like a print version would be delivered each day. The description also states that users can click on articles to access embedded links or share those articles on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

Subscribers can obtain the ePaper from bostonglobe.com or download the app from the iTunes store, while non-subscribers can purchase single issues for $0.99 or in-app subscriptions for $14.99 per month, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 13:49

Social media is a powerful tool for media organisations. It can be used to gather news, connect with audiences and increase the impact of stories. But social media can bite the hand that feeds it too - it can turn into an equally powerful forum to spread mistakes and amplify negative reactions to a brand.  

How can media companies handle these kind of situations to maintain the trust of their communities, deal with negative comments and ensure that they are sharing accurate information?

A panel discussion at the Social Media World Forum in London today, featuring representatives from a variety of industries including broadcast media, the police force and social networks themselves, tried to provide some answers.

Here's what they said:

 - Be prepared in advance.

As David Bailey, neighbourhood communications manager for the Staffordshire police put it, “you can’t learn social media while the streets are burning.”

If a big, negative story is about to break, you have to already have built up a connection with the community, and know how to respond to your users comments and criticisms. Colin Smith, the UK’s director of marketing solutions for LinkedIn backed Bailey up, emphasising that “people respond well if you’ve already built up trust.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 17:56

Do you want to improve your Twitter skiils? The USA Today College put together a list of nine Twitter "experts" who have their fingers on the pulse of modern journalism.

The American press is "complacent," "self-regarding" and "too up themselves" says Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre in an interview he gave to New Yorker's Lauren Collins, the Guardian reported. Read the whole interview on the New Yorker here.

Google announced its collaboration with the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory with the aim of helping "to preserve and digitize thousands of archival documents, photographs and videos about Nelson Mandela".

The Poynter Institute and the European Journalism Centre are collaborating on an new e-learning course on “Reporting & Writing About Development in the World” for 40 journalism students from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia, EJC announced.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-27 15:30

As users spend more and more of their time on Facebook and Twitter, a strong social media strategy is becoming increasingly crucial to the survival of any news organisation.

We all know this is true, but we’re still left with the question – exactly how should media companies approach social media? Where should publishers efforts be focused, and what should the be measuring in order to gauge their success?

Cathy Ma, Head of Social Media for IPC Media, which publishes NME, Marie Claire, In Style and Horse & Hound, among many other UK magazines, gave some answers to these questions at the Social Media World Forum in London, where she presented a guide on to how to set up a social media strategy and measure its success.

Ma says that the “holy grail” of social media success comes from finding the right audience, maintaining a relationship with them and then monetising the relationship.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 14:20

Google+ has come in for a lot of flack. It’s been called a “ghost town” by various news organisations and one viral image explaining social networks through the medium of donuts (of all things!) implied that while every other social platform serves a obvious purpose, the only people using Google+ were Google+ employees.

Speaking at the Social Media World Forum in London today, Chris Brogan, president of Human Business Works and author of Google Plus for Business, makes the case that businesses – and by extension publishers – should be thinking about Google+.

Brogan argues:

1)   Google is the biggest search engine in the world. But Google knows that links aren’t the only way people go to content, so it’s building its social presence. Google has been forcibly integrating Google+ into its search results through “social search plus your world” (although the function can be turned off) which means that what people’s friends say about your brand on Google+ affects how visible your search is. Don’t miss out on that business.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 11:05

Index on Censorship is marking its 40th anniversary of with a special issue, including an article on freedom of speech by Aung San Suu Kyi, reports Roy Greenslade for The Guardian. Greenslade notes that Index is also making its complete archive available online for free for the next 40 days.

Knight Blog has published an entry about Mercer University’s Center for Collaborative Journalism. As part of Mercer’s program, students will learn reporting skills from experienced journalists, and journalists will learn digital expertise from the students. 

Journalism.co.uk writes that since The Guardian opened up an office in New York seven months ago, the paper’s digital readership in the US has grown from 15 million to just under 20 million users. 

An in-depth article in Foreign Policy magazine considers the pressures on the Pakistani media, both from repressive government policies and from a lack of internal self-regulation.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 15:47

There’s nothing unusual about newsroom cuts these days, but that doesn’t help make them any less painful. And last week, that pain seems to have been particularly widespread. Media Bistro reported on Thursday that Bloomberg TV is cutting 30 staff positions, and CNN has let “dozens” of staff go from its two documentary units. A couple days earlier, as we reported, the LA Times also laid off between 12 and 20 staff members. On the other side of the Atlantic, The Guardian reports that media group Northern & Shell will be eliminating around 70 editorial posts across the Daily Express, Sunday Express, Daily Star and Daily Star Sunday.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 15:02

Today, free UK newspaper Metro announced the launch of a targeted consumer marketing campaign in London aimed to increase readership of its tablet edition, according to a press release. The campaign, which will continue for the rest of the week, aims to reach the “urbanite” audience that falls outside of Metro’s commuter distribution areas.

Advertisements will run on digital screens in London’s major train stations, in the print editions of Metro, on the music streaming service Spotify and through in-app ads, the release said.

The station ads, starting at 4pm each day, instruct viewers to take a picture of the front page of Metro’s tablet edition and then tweet the photo to @MetroUK with the hashtag #tablet and the viewer’s location, from which one winner will be chosen per day. Each day’s winner will then be entered for the chance to win a tablet.

The print ads include information about the tablet edition ads at train stations, but also instruct readers to download Blippar, an image-recognition app, on their mobile phones to play a 3D game, from which they will also have a chance to win a tablet, the release said.

Metro’s ads on Spotify offer consumers yet another chance to win something: by clicking on display ads, users are directed to Metro's Facebook page where they can enter to win a year-long membership to Spotify Premium.  

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-26 14:48

The American Press Institute is ceasing independent operations today after 66 years as a centre for journalism training and career development, reports the Washington Post.

In a move first announced in January, the API is merging with the Newspaper Association of America Foundation, a tax-exempt unit of America’s largest trade organisation for the newspaper industry.

The interim executive director of API Carol Ann Riordan reassures readers on API’s website that, as the two groups merge, “training, leadership development and best practices will be key activities of the new organization.”

As part of the move, API’s iconic building is being sold and its eight full-time staff and one part-time employee have been laid off, writes The Washington Post.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-23 18:36

AOL plans to launch a new digital magazine, Huffington, for tablets, according to Forbes. The weekly magazine will feature a combination of original and aggregated Huffington Post content and will be free to readers.

Chris Hamilton talks to MediaBistro about his role as BBC News Social Media Editor, offers tips on handling breaking news via Twitter.

A 1966 memo, written by former Daily Mail Editor Mike Randall and released by Jack Dyson on his blog, highlights journalistic ethics of the period, The Guardian reports.

Boston University's College of Communication will hold its annual nonfiction conference, featuring 32 celebrated journalists who will discuss storytelling journalism, BU Today reports.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-23 17:30

When Ashley Highfield, former the director of Microsoft's UK consumer and online business and previous head of technology for the BBC, was appointed as CEO of Johnston Press last July, it was natural to assume that he would be guiding the publisher towards a digital future. But not long after he took up his position, The Guardian’s Roy Greenslade criticised him for defending print and offering “nothing different from what we have heard for years from the digitally-blind ink-stained veterans of the press.”

Perhaps Greenslade can rest easy now, because speaking at The Guardian’s Changing Media Summit last Wednesday, Highfield made a firm commitment to turning making Johnston Press’s local newspapers “digital-first”.

“We are going to be launching new websites for every one of our papers,” said Highfield, who is quoted by paidContent. “We’re going to flip the model from newspaper-first every day to digital-first, and you take the best and produce a bumper weekly in print. By 2020, that will be the model. We’ve run the numbers and think that can be a profitable model.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-23 15:27

The Associated Press announced today that Gary Pruitt, the chairman, president and CEO of The McClatchy Co., will become its newest chief executive officer in July, succeeding current President and CEO Tom Curley upon his retirement, The New York Times Media Decoder blog reported.

McClatchy owns 30 daily papers and is the third largest US newspaper publisher. Pruitt will be succeeded by Pat Talamantes as the new CEO of McClatchy and byKevin McClatchy as chairman, the article said.

Pruitt, who spent 28 years at McClatchy, is no stranger to the AP, serving on its Board of Directors for nine years, according to an AP press release. He also formerly served as a chair of the Newspaper Association of America.

In the press release, Pruitt praised Curley’s tenure as chief executive, as well as the digital direction the AP has embraced in recent years.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-22 18:59

Tanya Cordrey, digital development director for Guardian News and Media, announced that traffic from The Guardian’s Facebook app surpassed traffic fromGoogle searches on multiple occasions this past February, predicting that social will eventually drive traffic more than search overall, journalism.co.uk reported.

In the spring issue of Nieman Reports, past newspaper editors of The Los Angeles TimesThe Philadelphia Inquirer and others responded to this question: “What would you change if you were back in charge?” Read some of their insights here

Editor & Publisher discusses six easy strategies that newspapers can use to establish more of a digital presence, including engaging with readers through social networking

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-22 18:57

You can’t reduce journalism to a simple formula. But if you had to try, a pretty good guess might be “good content + effective distribution = success.”

A new partnership announced between Digital First Media and ProPublica fits well into the equation. As part of the deal, ProPublica will provide Digital First Media with pre-publication access to its news apps, which in the past have taken the form of easily searchable databases of information in the public interest, such as Dollars for Docs, which allows users to see how much money their doctor has accepted from pharmaceutical companies. Digital First Media will then be able to use the content of these apps as a basis for stories at different publications across its large network of local newspapers.

Yet it would be an inaccurate undersell to say that ProPublica is simply providing information and Digital First Media sharing it. Digital First Media journalists won’t simply be distributing the data, they should be building on it to create stories that show its specific local relevance.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-22 18:39

The Wrap reported yesterday that the LA Times is laying off between 12 and 20 staff members in a fresh round of redundancies. A spokeswoman from the Times, who is quoted by The Wrap, says the redundancies “are primarily editorial positions," although she added, "some are administration, some are copy desk, some are design, some are news operations."

The Wrap writes that arts and entertainment editor Craig Turner, who has worked for the Times for more than 40 years, and Shari Roan, who has reported for the paper’s health section for 22 years, are among those who will be leaving.

As Kevin Roderick at LA Observed notes, last month the standalone Health section for which Roan used to write was scrapped along with the Food and Home sections. All have now been merged into a new “lifestyle” section published on Saturdays.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-21 18:39

The Daily Mail was named "newspaper of the year" at the UK 2012 Press Awards yesterday and its journalist Craig Brown took home the awards for columnist and best humour writer and as well as critic of the year for his Mail on Sunday writing, the Guardian reported. Scoop of the year went to the Guardian's Nick Davies and Amelia Hill for their "Milly Dowler phone hacked" exclusive. Press Gazette published the list of all the winners here.

Time has picked an (early!) list of the “The 140 Best Twitter Feeds of 2012.” Jim Romenesko publishes those selected in the category “News and Information” on his blog. Among the winners are Andy Carvin or NPR, Brian Stelter of The New York Times, The Economist and BBC Breaking.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-21 17:35


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