Date

Sun - 22.10.2017


December 2011

Following years of retreat in the face of shrinking readership, mounting financial losses, and a rising chorus of digital visionaries telling them they're doing it all wrong, 2012 will be a year of retrenchment for newspaper publishers.

Still standing some three years after the near-implosion of the newspaper industry in 2008 and 2009, executives will point to their continued existence as proof that their situation was never as bad as it seemed, and that a few tweaks here and there will restore them to pink-cheeked, if downsized, health.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-22 17:33

by Mathew Ingram

We've written many times about how journalism is changing in the age of social media, thanks to what Om has called the "democracy of distribution" provided by tools like Twitter -- and how everyone now has the opportunity to function as a journalist, even for a short time, during news events like the attack on Osama bin Laden's compound. A new study of the way information flowed during the Arab Spring uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt earlier this year paints a fascinating picture of how what some call "news as a process" works, and the roles bloggers, mainstream media and other actors play during a breaking news event. More than anything, it's a portrait of what the news looks like now.

Continue reading on GigaOM

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-22 17:24

by Robert Hernandez

Granted, this will make for a weak lede, but allow me to start this piece with a disclosure: I, like many of you, am not a fan of prediction posts.

Typically, they aren't based on anything real and are often used to make grand statements we all roll our eyes at... and don't get me started on how often they're wrong.

That aside, here's another piece to roll your eyes at.

But here's a tweak, this is not really a prediction... this is, to be honest, more of a hopeful wish.

Okay, ready? Here goes.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-21 17:39

By now, most daily news publishers are making at least some attempt to make their content accessible on cell phones and tablets. But usually their strategies focus on "shovelware"--automatically repackaging content produced for the computer-based web, with scant consideration for how and why people use mobile devices.

In a recent interview, Luke Wroblewski (a top expert on mobile design and usability) explained why news publishers should start thinking "mobile first"--and how they can achieve that goal to get ahead of the next disruptive wave of media technology...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-21 17:33

For years now, the line between the software business and the media business has been blurring. Software applications used to take the form of packaged goods, sold through retail outlets at set prices. Today, as a result of cloud computing and other advances, applications look more and more like media products. They're ad-supported, subscribed to, continually updated, and the content they incorporate is often as important as the functions they provide. As traditional media companies have moved to distribute their wares in digital form -- as code, in other words -- they've come to resemble software companies. They provide not only original content, but an array of online tools and functions that allow customers to view, manipulate, and add to the content in myriad ways.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-20 17:44

by Jeff Jarvis

As I ponder the future of The New York Times, it occurred to me that its pay meter could be exactly reversed. I'll also tell you why this wouldn't work in a minute. But in any case, this is a way to illustrate how how media are valuing our readers/users/customers opposite how we should, rewarding the freeriders and taxing -- and perhaps turning away -- the valuable users.

So try this on for size: Imagine that you pay to get access to The Times. Everyone does. You pay for one article.

Continue reading on BuzzMachine

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-20 17:40

One of the sessions at news:rewired - media in motion will look at how newsgames and gaming mechanics are being used in journalism.

Shannon Perkins, editor of interactive technologies at Wired.com and who created Cutthroat Capitalism, a game where the player puts themselves in the position of a Somali pirate, will be coming over from the US to speak at news:rewired. In a Journalism.co.uk podcast he said a reader should "develop a deeper sense of the underlying themes of a story" by playing a game.

Continue reading on journalism.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-20 10:04

When it comes to cracking the digital media code, 2011 involved more testing than learning. Media companies seem to be locked in a feverish search mode. Their sense of urgency is reinforced by the continuous depletion of worldwide fundamentals: digital advertising's encephalogram remains flat (at best); and when audiences grow, revenues do not necessarily correlate. As for legacy media such as large quality newspapers which still draw 70-80% of their revenue from print, they are still caught in a double jeopardy: losing circulation plus looming downward price pressure on ads.

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-20 09:54

The concept of paywalls, which publishers continue to agonise over, is a by-product of our digital age. But, writes Ross Sturley, there are some valuable lessons to learn from an earlier wall-building exercise.

Back in the sixteenth century, there was a bit of a hoohah about 'enclosures'. Landowners were building walls around their land to keep the peasants off it. While the land had not been truly free for a long time, the peasants got upset as they felt some right of way or use was being taken away from them.

Continue reading on InPublishing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-19 09:19

Javier Errea, a journalism graduate, is the principal of Errea Comunicación, a news design studio based in Spain. An Associate Professor at the School of Communication, University of Navarra, he is also the President of the Spanish Chapter of the Society for News Design and coordinator of the Malofiej Infographics World Summit and Competition. He is also a winner of the SND's Lifetime Achievement Award. He was behind the design of much acclaimed Portugals "i".

Continue reading on newspaperdesign.ning.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-19 09:10

Theory alone won't change any business's fortunes. To succeed, you need the guts to put radical ideas into action. On this basis, perhaps we can all learn a thing or two from John Paton, the 54-year old Denver-based publisher who is trying to turn around America's second-largest regional newspaper chain.

When it comes to newspapers, strategists don't typically look to the struggling US industry for inspiration. Instead, they seek out innovation in Oslo, Mumbai or even London, where the Economist argues that Britain's national newspapers have become "exceptionally innovative".

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 17:23

Faster, cheaper, better. That is what our polls tell us consumers are demanding from products and services; in their airlines, insurance deals, smartphones and apparently in their information.

As news outlets take more steps to tighten their belts, cheaper but more enticing ways to source original content may thrive.

One of these is "data journalism", championed recently by The Guardian, the ABC and Fairfax Media, using data to make storytelling visual and interactive via websites.

Continue reading on smh.com.au

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 17:18

Ira Stoll is a man with a pretty unique idea -- putting media credibility into the hands of the online public. His weapon of choice: a new project he calls NewsTransparency.com -- a Wikipedia-style site that aims to help readers hold journalists accountable for their actions. The site is born partially out of Stoll's interest in media criticism and partially out of the wide disparity in the quality of journalistic copy he came across during his time as editor of the now defunct New York Sun.

Continue reading on memeburn

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 09:09

Next year will be the year that the big technology companies go after local publishing and broadcasting businesses more fiercely than ever before. Most local media companies have no idea what's about to hit them - much less a plan to respond.

Google already has feet on the street from Portland to New York City to sell search advertising and directory listings to small and medium business (SMBs).

Continue reading on Reflections of a Newsosaur

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-15 08:58

PULLMAN, Wash. - A study out of Washington State University shows that people who are frequent readers of a daily newspaper tend to be more trusting of others than those who read newspapers less frequently. The effect holds for both residents of small towns and big cities, even though researchers found small town residents are more trusting in general than city dwellers.

Continue reading on WSU News

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-14 09:02

We've come a long way in the few short months since the full Hackgate scandal exploded, writes Press Gazette guest blogger Lara Fielden.

The immediate aftermath saw seismic criticism of self-regulation under the Press Complaints Commission, the departure of its chairman and demands for statutory press regulation. Punitive fines and effective licensing, akin to the model for broadcasting regulation, were the order of the day.

Continue reading on Press Gazette

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-14 08:43

by Alan D. Mutter

Last month, we discussed the generous contribution publishers have been making to the dramatic growth of Facebook, a wondrously addictive medium that seems to be commanding ever-greater amounts of time from an ever-larger number of consumers.

Today, we're going to talk about how newspapers can get Facebook to work as effectively for them as most papers have been working for Facebook.

Continue reading on Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-13 09:54

by Frédéric Filloux

I love talking about the things I enjoy using. The emerging ecosystem in which a bunch of smart people curate long form journalism is definitely one of those things. The companies are called Instapaper, Longreads, Longform. I love the material they find for me and I'm in the debt of developers who wrote neat applications that help me manage my very own library of great stories.

My reading selection process for long articles (say above 2500 words) goes like this.

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-13 09:47

If you want to save journalism, you might turn to journalism this year for all your Christmas shopping.

This weekend at NewsFoo, an O'Reilly "un-conference" for about 170 journalists and tech disrupters, the tech writer Mónica Guzmán posed a question: "Can't we [news organizations] sell anything besides articles?" Yes, it turns out, and there are numerous examples of them trying it.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-12 09:55

by John Bethune

If I were asked to name one active blogger that every B2B journalist should follow, I would probably suggest Adam Tinworth. For more than eight years, the British trade press editor has blogged about journalism, social media, and much more on One Man and His Blog. His insights there are based on a combination of his ongoing and enthusiastic experimentation with new-media platforms and his practical experience as an editor and blog evangelist for the UK branch of Reed Business Information (RBI).

Continue reading on B2B Memes

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-12 09:47

by Kris Hammond

At News Foo Camp, I was asked about how much news will be computer generated in 15 years. My reluctant take on this was that it would be on the order of 90%. My reluctance was the result of the fact that while this strikes me as inevitable, it always leads to a fair amount of angst among the people who hear it. With that in mind, it seemed to me that it might be a good idea to explain what that number means and why I think it makes sense given current information and technology trends.

Continue reading on Just to Clarify

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-09 09:03

by Robert Niles

We've talked at length about finding new sources of revenue as the news industry moves from a monopoly-driven market to a more competitive one. (And that's the real change that's happening in our industry - not a switch from print to online.) But all the newly self-appointed publishers online will find themselves in the same vulnerable position as their print predecessors if they don't adopt different attitudes about management even as they work to find new customers for their publications.

Continue reading in The Online Journalism Review

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-09 08:51

Year after year, the "State of the News Media"-report of the Project for Excellence in Journalism paints a bleak picture of our media future. In the eighth installment of VOCER's interview series, director Tom Rosenstiel looks at the bright side and talks about good times still to come.

From vocer.de

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-08 09:45

The transition from old media to new media hasn't been smooth for newspapers and it's not over yet, but along the way news sites have learned important lessons about serving up video.

Beet.TV spoke to Ann Derry, editorial director for video and television for the New York Times, and Shawn Bender, editorial director for video for the Wall Street Journal Online, about why site visitors hit the Play button on a video.

Continue reading on OnlineVideo.net

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-08 09:25


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