Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


November 2011

Are you pricing your content intelligently? Or is your pricing model lacking a scientific approach? Jimmy Gasteen is the CEO and founder of Precursive, a new media business consultancy and workflow tools firm, and previously a pricing analyst at Reed Elsevier.

He thinks a lot of media businesses have got it wrong when it comes to price and that a little analytical thinking will go a long way for both B2B and consumer media products.

Source: TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-30 09:19

Some news websites are seeing remarkably strong traffic to old stories, prompting an intriguing question -- how important is it, really, that news be new?

Tim Bradshaw reports in the Financial Times about "a surge of Facebook traffic to years-old stories" since some websites enabled the open graph, or so-called "frictionless sharing," to Facebook of every article a person reads.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-30 09:12

Newspaper publishers need to quickly solve a troublesome equation. As carbon-based readership keeps dwindling, the growing legion of digital readers is poorly accounted for. This benefits advertisers who pay less for their presence.

Putting aside web sites audience measurement, we'll focus instead on the currently ill-defined notion of digital editions. A subject of importance since digital editions are poised to play a key role in the future of online information.

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-29 10:25

by Sean Carton

Why can't newspapers seem to make any money online?

That's the question I asked myself the other day as I ran smack up against The Baltimore Sun's paywall after having reached my 15 page per month (free) limit. I'm not a big reader of the Sun, but I was curious about what people were saying about Gordon Ramsay's "Kitchen Nightmares" visit to one of our local eateries. I clicked a link on Facebook that was supposed to lead me to a post on the Sun's food blog when I smacked right into the wall.

Continue reading on ClickZ

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-29 09:57

You're reading a wrap-up of the Sept. 22 Republican presidential debate when you land on this claim from Rep. Michele Bachmann: "President Obama has the lowest public approval ratings of any president in modern times."

Really? You start googling for evidence. Maybe you scour the blogs or the fact-checking sites. It takes work, all that critical thinking.

That's why Dan Schultz, a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab (and newly named Knight-Mozilla fellow for 2012), is devoting his thesis to automatic bullshit detection.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-28 10:25

Here are some words of wisdom from John Meehan, former editor of the Hull Daily Mail, in an InPublishing article, Sustaining community journalism in the regions.

"The industry cannot be focused predominantly on print. The platform is not important - the content is...

Regional media businesses have spent years agonising over 'the internet'. What do we put on it? Who does it? How do we make money on it?

Continue reading on the Greenslade Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-28 09:52

Carolyn Washburn, editor of The Cincinnati Enquirer, says cutbacks require that news leaders define their "unique role" in the news ecosystem - as a watchdog, for example. To focus, smaller newsrooms also need to stop doing some things.

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-25 09:12

Traditional media companies everywhere are in turmoil. Most are caught somewhere between maximising (as best they can) profits from declining media 'channels' - and investing in businesses that just might become the next big thing. Few are actually in denial about the darkening outlook for their legacy businesses, although their somewhat rosy views of the timescales of decline amount almost to the same thing.

Continue reading on Flashes & Flames

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-25 09:06

Mark Medici, then-vice president of audience for the Dallas Morning News, triggered a brief media frenzy in October when he said at a conference that within three years the Morning News wouldn't be publishing seven days a week. Though the paper quickly backed away from his remark, with Publisher Jim Moroney asserting that the Belo-owned paper has no intention of cutting back, the flap raised the question of whether daily newspapers will soon cease to be daily.

Continue reading in American Journalism Review

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-24 11:04

News must be really hard to follow for an everyday consumer of a newspaper website. First tweets go out, sometimes with no links to additional coverage. Then a few grafs go up on a blog, followed by additional updates, either to the top of that post or as new posts. Eventually, a print story gets started, which is posted through an entirely different workflow onto a different-looking story page.

Continue reading on 10,000 Words

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-24 10:59

After an initial wave of excitement about iPad magazines, some publishers have dialed back their enthusiasm. But the readers who have actually downloaded them like them quite a bit.

So says a survey commissioned by a publishers' trade group: It finds that two-thirds of people who read magazines on tablets and e-readers think they'll be spending more time with digital issues over the next year.

Continue reading on All Things Digital

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-23 10:05

Helsingin Sanomat, the leading national daily in Finland, decided back in 2006 to offer a "Combo" subscription to print and all digital versions of the paper.

Five years later (with an iPad version now in play too) Helsingin Sanomat has 120,000 subscribers to the combo, a third of its subscription base. Now, 80 percent of new subscription sales are for that package.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-23 09:50

Updated: It's a distributed digital-information network that gives subscribers short news updates in something approaching real time, whether on the web or a mobile device. If you said Twitter, you would be right. But that same description also fits traditional newswires like Associated Press and Reuters. So how are they trying to evolve and compete with this new social news service?

Continue reading on Giga OM

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-22 11:15

A really interesting discussion arose recently about a memo sent to journalists working on a group of newspapers just outside Detroit of what was expected of them in the age of digital journalism and social media. The memo details an extraordinary list of requirements that is well beyond being achievable or even desirable for most news stories or pieces of content.

However, it is what some are being asked to achieve as their editors and publishers ask for too much, without putting in place the resources needed to make it happen, to the detriment of the most of important thing which is the story.

Continue reading on the Wall Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-22 10:52

by Mario Garcia

Resurrection is the word many are using to describe the reappearance of the long time evening daily, Pittsburgh Press, now back as an online newspaper. Will others follow?

So it is all about the "lean back" approach and reading newspapers in the evening.

Why am I not surprised?

Continue reading on Garcí­a Media

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-21 09:56

by Earl J. Wilkinson

Suggesting culture change at newspapers is like questioning religious tenets in church. It may be sacrilegious, but it also may be necessary. You will be bashed by the high priests and bolstered by those in the shadows.

In the past few weeks, I've taken my theme of culture change from Australia to Sweden to Portugal to the United States to India.

Continue reading on the INMA site

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-21 09:50

by Steve Outing

I recently participated (well, sort of -- via a remote Skype presentation) in the University of South Carolina's "Journalism, Sustainability, and Media Regeneration Conference." Its organizer, Professor Augie Grant, sent a survey to everyone who attended that opened with a couple questions that I should not answer but cannot resist:

"Think about all of the possible forms of delivering news and information online. In general, what 'top of the mind' ideas do you think 'online news' will look like in 20 years?"

Continue reading on steveouting.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-18 09:14

by Rick Waghorn

Two quick stories to hopefully illustrate why I believe the salvation of local news in this country and beyond lies in reuniting Batman with Robin and once more pairing the local news reporter with his local advertising equivalent.

Earlier this autumn I served a request using the Freedom of Information Act on Norfolk County Council after it opted to collaborate with a well-known online advertising firm in Mountain View, California with regard to their online advertising provision.

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-18 09:08

When it comes to editorial practices, online and non-online platforms are increasingly given the same importance. Break the story online, give the analysis in print. That's the approach taken by many B2B magazines, newspapers and even TV news programmes. But commercially, is the gap between bits and bytes still too big and are predominately print-based publishers moving too slowly?

In a low-key announcement yesterday, Guardian News & Media says that as part of its "digital first" strategy it will consolidate print and online advertising systems into one ad selling platform.

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-17 10:57

Human beings cling to the past, ensuring that the nostalgia industry never declines. Indeed, the greater the change, the more it thrives. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the regional newspaper industry as it copes with a range of problems that make it inconceivable it could ever turn back the clock.

Delegates to this week's Society of Editors conference, like so many journalists, are particularly prone to the illusion that there is a magic solution to their industry's long-term decline.

Continue reading in the London Evening Standard

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-17 10:50

A BLAZE of bullets greets your arrival in a country torn by war. You dive for cover as a gun battle rages around you.

As a journalist, you're desperately trying to capture the story, taking photos while fearing for your survival.

You flee for the safety of a partially destroyed building to avoid the crossfire. . . this could be the streets of Gaddafi's hometown of Sirte, the back alleys of Mogadishu, or the hills of Helmand Province.

Yet it is the world of "WARCO" - a video game designed to train journalists to operate in the combat zone.

Continue reading on the PANPA site

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-15 17:44

The story of Steve Jobs is beyond epic. There's not many who could change the world of personal computers, music, phones and animated films in one lifetime. His character DNA was a mix of sheer genius, vision, tenacity and often disturbing habits that easily puts him in the same league as Edison, Ford and Tesla.

Continue reading on mel taylor Media

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-15 17:34

A former regional newspaper editor has come up with a 10-point plan to help cure the crisis in the regional press - which includes a call for debt relief for big PLC publishers like Johnston Press and Trinity Mirror .

Neil Fowler, Guardian Research Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford , outlined his plan in a lecture in which he warned that Johnston, Trinity and Newsquest -owner Gannett were "having to pull as much cash as possible out of their businesses to service these debts - which in turn is causing those businesses long term damage."

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-15 11:46

As much as we tout Twitter for its conversational abilities -- for its revolutionary capacity to create discursive, rather than simply distributive, relationships with news consumers -- many major news organizations are still using the service as, pretty much, a vehicle for self-promotion. A new study, released today by Pew's Project for Excellence in Journalism, studied 13 news organizations, large and (relatively) small, from print, TV, and radio...and found that "mainstream news organizations primarily use Twitter to move information and push content to readers. For these organizations, Twitter functions as an RSS feed or headline service for news consumers, with links ideally driving traffic to the organization's website."

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-15 10:24


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