Date

Sun - 20.08.2017


October 2011

Publishers, don't start skimping on your iPad editions now. Magazine and newspaper apps' quality seems to be the most important factor in their success with consumers, according to the first annual "The State of the App" report from McPheters & Company's iMonitor service, drawing on iMonitor's evaluations of 3,000 apps from publishers around the world.

Continue reading on Ad Age Mediaworks

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-31 09:28

by Matt Thompson

In a busy corner of the metajournalism world, a crowd of journalists is assembling what amounts to a public, open-source curriculum on how to do hacker journalism. In blogs, tweets, Git repositories, meetups and slide decks, they're sharing code snippets, tutorials, data sets, How To's and more, in ways that are often engaging and accessible to non-geeks.

If I lost you at "Git repositories," let me back up a step.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-31 09:22

The great debate in newspaper circles these days involves paywalls and metering.

It wasn't that long ago that the mantra in newspapers was "Internet first" and involved 24-by-7 newsrooms that posted news to the Web first, regardless of print newspaper deadlines.

While at many newspaper companies Internet revenues increased, they didn't rise fast enough to replace declining print advertising and circulation revenues. The spreadsheet dilemma became: "Can print dollars be replaced with Internet dimes?"

So far, the answer has been no.

Continue reading on News & Tech

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-28 10:24

The 2010 version of the Knight News Challenge featured an entry for a very cool project: PaperNews, middleware that sought to "reinvent how we see news design on the web."

PaperNews wasn't, ultimately, funded. But part of its spirit lives on in Scroll, a new editor that aims to de-templatize news design. The tool, created by soon-to-be-serial entrepreneurs Cody Brown and Kate Ray, wants to take the basic design approach of print -- start with a totally blank page, add elements -- and apply it to the online world.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-28 10:15

Physical construction may be down across the Western World, but there's a boom in paywalls.

At least 150 paywalls have been erected over the last year or so, in the U.S., U.K., and across Europe. American companies in on that construction boom include Lee, McClatchy, Morris, MediaGeneral, MediaNews, Gatehouse, and Tribune (all powered by Press+), as well as Scripps, Gannett, and Belo. From Sanoma in Finland to The Telegraph in the U.K., a number of dailies are following the trend. Those that haven't are almost all considering a paywall in some form; many more will launch in the next 12 months.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-27 09:40

Last week journalism professor Matt Waite wrote a blog post worrying about the typical defeatist reaction of journalism students when faced with a coding challenge, whether in HTML, JavaScript, or other language: "I can't do this," they tell him. "This is impossible. I'll never get this." When I tweeted a link to the article, I wrote ""Journos: If you fear coding, you fear the future."

That prompted a response from a practicing trade journalist and former colleague, who asked "I can see why knowing things like HTML and CSS can be helpful but do most journos need more than that?"

Continue reading on B2B Memes

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-27 09:30

by Mallary Jean Tenore

Social networks have helped make journalists more accessible by breaking down barriers between the public and the media. But there's a disconnect between journalists' accessibility on social networks and their accessibility on news sites.

As a media reporter, I've often been frustrated by how hard I have to look for journalists' contact information on news sites -- and by how few usable results I get. I sometimes find nothing more than a generic email address, or a list of emails for departments instead of people.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-26 10:54

by Roy Greenslade

Should a local newspaper have its office in the centre of the town, city or borough where it circulates? In an ideal (aka former) world, yes.

Should a local council advertise all its public notices, planning applications and job recruitment opportunities in the local paper (or papers)? In an ideal (aka former) world, yes.

Clearly, by qualifying the "ideal" with "former", my questions are loaded.

Continue reading on Greenslade Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-26 10:06

Many newspapers and other traditional media entities still think of themselves as delivering their content in a specific package, although most are trying hard to build an online readership as well, or experiment with iPad and Facebook apps (not to mention paywalls). But few are thinking about their businesses in radically different ways -- as content-generating engines with multiple delivery methods, or as platforms for data, around which other things can be built. USA Today appears to be moving in this direction, by opening up its data for others to use and even commercialize, following in the footsteps of The Guardian and its ground-breaking "open platform."

Continue reading on GigaOm

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 17:36

by Jeff Sonderman

A couple weeks ago I predicted that Apple's virtual Newsstand for iPads and iPhones would provide "a little more convenience for the user, and a little more discoverability for the publisher -- but nothing here is a game-changer."

I stand by the first part of that diagnosis, but it's now clear there is something game-changing about Newsstand. Since Apple launched it last week in the latest version of its iOS operating system, its impact has been immediate and significant. Many Newsstand apps now rank among the top free apps overall, and magazine and newspaper apps are benefiting from a surge of downloads and subscribers.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 17:22

Orlando, Fla., October 18, 2011-- Gartner, Inc. today highlighted the top 10 technologies and trends that will be strategic for most organizations in 2012. The analysts presented their findings during Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, being held here through October 20.

Gartner defines a strategic technology as one with the potential for significant impact on the enterprise in the next three years. Factors that denote significant impact include a high potential for disruption to IT or the business, the need for a major dollar investment, or the risk of being late to adopt.

A strategic technology may be an existing technology that has matured and/or become suitable for a wider range of uses. It may also be an emerging technology that offers an opportunity for strategic business advantage for early adopters or with potential for significant market disruption in the next five years. These technologies impact the organization's long-term plans, programs and initiatives.

Continue reading in the Gartner Newsroom

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 10:31

by Dean Roper

Béla Papp, publishing director of Ringier Studios, owned by international publisher Ringier in Switzerland, describes how this new venture aims to build up a client base and a new revenue stream.

The company is focusing on developing apps for iPad and Android tablets with the clear goal of "being a leading app provider," says Papp during a World Editors Forum session focusing on tablet publishing.

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 10:22

by Dean Roper

"When we decided to put our content behind the wall, our newsroom was horrified," says Dirk Nolde, managing editor of the Berliner Morgenpost, during Saturday's World Editors Forum session on paywalls.

"Fortunately," he says, "our readers are indeed willing to pay, and we think it is because they believe there is quality content and it is OK to pay for that."

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-21 09:39

by Alexandra Waldhorn

When the New York Times first erected a paywall - as a possible cure for slipping profits - Assistant Managing Editor Jim Roberts says he was wary.

"I was one of the few in the newsroom who thought it was a bad idea. I was really worried that our audience, which we had worked so hard to attract, would shrink," Roberts says during the World Editors Forum session, "Paywalls, from the newsroom perspective."

He was especially concerned that the younger audience, often attracted through social media, would flee. Advertising would follow suit, he thought - if the readership shrunk, so would advertising.

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-21 09:28

by Alexandra Waldhorn

The craft of journalism has remained by and large the same over the past century. During the "Looking Beyond the Article" session of the World Editors Forum, Bill Adair, founder and editor of Politifact, suggests the industry could benefit from switching things up.

"Fifteen years into the Internet age and we are still publishing stories the way we published them 100 years ago," says Adair, "just pasting on the web."

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-20 11:16

by Dean Roper

Showing the power of today's array of media platforms and tools at a publisher's disposal to go beyond the article, Marcelo Rech, director of content for RBS in Brazil, describes at the World Editors Forum how a reporter told the same story 16 years apart using technologies before the Internet and after Facebook.

In 1995 Carlos Wagner, a reporter for Zero Hora, the national daily newspaper from RBS, was sent on a long journey through southern Brazil to report about the lives of migrant workers in the region.

Continue reading on the 18th World Editors Forum Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-20 11:09

There was a great story in The Onion a few weeks back, right after Steve Jobs announced that he was stepping down as CEO of Apple. The headline read, "New Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'I'm thinking printers'"

Not that there's anything wrong with printers, mind you. Something has to do the dirty work of printing out all those Groupons. The point is, with all the creative talent Apple has at its disposal, all the cutting-edge skills and resources, the company is probably better served developing cool products, not designing slick new ink cartridges for the DeskJet.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-19 10:42

The plight of traditional newspaper businesses is depressing many people in the UK, US, Australia and elsewhere. Journalists see their jobs at risk from the limitless supply of "free" always-on news and lean online 'aggregators'. Investors face losses and the decline of historic, once so-powerful news brands. And proprietors, bloated by years of prestige, power and profit, have to accept that it might all just disappear. Try asking teenagers whether they can imagine a world without daily papers.

Continue reading on Flashes & Flames

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-19 10:33

"One of the legacies of Steve Jobs is that he's taught us to pay for content," says Adam Bird, director, McKinsey & Company, speaking of the late Apple founder in a presentation on how consumers behave with new technologies.

When it comes to paid-for apps, books, news and magazines are doing quite well, he says. Speaking at a World Newspaper Congress session dedicated to technology, Bird focuses on how consumers are interacting with the new devices.

"If we start to think about technology in general, the only real certainty is that we are going to have more technology," he says. "The sheer volume and pace of change is phenomenal. E-mails per second are up to 2.9 million. There are 20 hours of content uploaded to YouTube per minute. The sheer scale of this is absolutely phenomenal."

What's changing the most? Bird suggests looking at mobile developments as they become more social, more video, more local.

"If we look at it in terms of mobile, if we isolate one thing that will happen, it is that every phone will become a smartphone, and it is absolutely changing how people are using them," he says. "It's almost used for everything but voice communication; we're certainly seeing that trend accelerating. Mobile is becoming a serious advertising platform as well."

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2011-10-18 11:03

by Steve Yelvington

"Digital First!" is a great battle cry, and thank you, John Paton, for giving it to us all. It is pure leadership, a flag planted forward declaring that newspapers now see print as the past and digital as the present and future.

As it is adopted in places as disparate as the Guardian in the UK, the student newspaper at the University of Georgia, and at Morris, where I work, we all have to be on guard against a too-facile interpretation, especially in newsrooms.

Continue reading on yelvington.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-18 10:31

The smallest kid on the block is making the most noise again. Enter, last Tuesday, the new - or at least latest - version of the Independent, with a big, bold, red masthead, some slick new typography and what its equally new editor calls "a coherent, easily navigated" running order. No Viewspaper sitting in the middle: just views and news mixed for pace and impact from page one. It's a good moment to pause, then - and think print.

Continue reading on Peter Preston on press and broadcasting

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-18 10:18

by Patrick Smith

If the news business can't get young people interested in its products, where are new readers going to come from? Only a model that includes inter-personal, social publishing can excite the next generation of news consumers. But print should play an important role too.

Back in 2009 I took part in that most rare of industry events - a discussion panel on the future of newspapers. Alongside me that night was Peter Barron, the editor of the Northern Echo, the Newsquest-owned daily morning paper serving a huge swathe of Yorkshire and the North-East of England.

Continue reading on the Media Briefing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 20:47

by Jeff Sonderman

Editor's note: With news of Steve Jobs' passing on Oct. 5, we thought it was appropriate to republish this story, written when he resigned as CEO of Apple.

Steve Jobs resigned Wednesday as CEO of Apple Inc., but his legacy will be felt in the news industry for years to come.

In the past five years, Jobs' Apple has simultaneously disrupted, transformed and aided the news industry.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 20:38

Traditional Newspaper management is just like the old guard in Baseball. That's what you'll think after watching Moneyball starring Brad Pitt as Oakland A's general manager; Billy Beane.

Based on a true story, Moneyball shows Beane going up against his old school, know-it-all, front office. He's tired of being in last place and squeaking by on a shoe string budget. Unable to afford star players, Billy decides to slaughter a few sacred cows and installs experimental yet logical tactics into his game plan.

Continue reading on Mel Taylor Media

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-06 09:19


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