Date

Wed - 29.03.2017


July 2011

The business of newspaper syndication began in the 19th century when many newspapers, especially in smaller cities and towns, found it difficult to maintain a large enough staff to report on anything other than local news. Ansel Kellogg is credited with starting the first American independent newspaper syndicate in 1865, which supplied small-town newspaper editors with newsprint that had syndicated national material printed on one side. Editors who bought the service then printed their local news and advertising on the blank sides of the sheets.

Continue reading on Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-29 10:25

The magazine industry's current interest and investment in tablets beyond the iPad can be described as tentative at best.

It's not terribly surprising. Even by the most conservative of estimates, the iPad will make up the lion's share of worldwide tablet sales for the next three to four years. Nearly seven of every ten tablets in consumers' hands at year's end will be iPads, Gartner forecasts.

Continue reading on Mashable

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-29 09:53

It appears to be Pick On News Web Designers Day today. This comic -- poking at news sites' unwillingness to link, misuse of thumbnails, and addictions to share buttons, among other things -- made the rounds of Twitter, to the point of crashing cartoonist Brad Colbow's site.

But even more talked about, on Hacker News anyway, was web designer Andy Rutledge's unrequested redesign of the website of The New York Times.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-28 11:43

What makes the new media interesting?

For some, it's the many new voices who can now find an audience. Whether it's a blog, podcast or Twitter feed, the new media is less about the consumption of content and aimed much closer to the reality that anyone who has something to say can now publish their thoughts -- in text, images, audio and video -- instantly for the world to see (and it costs next-to-nothing).

Continue reading on Huffpost Canada

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-28 11:37

Under the heading "necessity is the mother of invention," investigative reporting nonprofits have popped up like journalists at a magazine-sponsored soiree offering free hors d'oeuvres and alcohol.

Using industry-renowned editors and staffers, the nonprofits take on in-depth investigations that newspapers no longer have the time or the staff to conquer. The larger nonprofits generally report on any number of public policy issues with the goal of exposing wrongs and making corporations and institutions -- governmental and nongovernmental -- accountable.

Continue reading in Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-27 10:10

Google+ has taken off like no other social network before it. While it's still in 'limited field trial' mode, it's already being seriously considered as a contender to take on Twitter and Facebook. Journalists already use both those networks to great effect. Could Google+ see similar usage?

Some journalists have already started experimenting with Google+ as a way to share, discuss or source news. Here are a few examples:

Continue reading on TNW Google

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-27 10:03

We all know that regional publishers are currently in transition. On the one hand, driven by a growing interest in local web content, the online audience for regional papers grew by nearly 25 per cent over the second half of 2010. On the other hand, print circulations are dropping, along with corresponding advertising revenue.

Most regionals realise that innovation and new services are the keys to digital success, which is why they are experimenting with a raft of new ideas to attract and retain consumers and drive revenues.

Continue reading on InPublishing

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-26 10:43

For the past several days, The Economist has been hosting a debate between journalism professor Jay Rosen and digital skeptic and author Nicholas Carr, as part of an ongoing series about the future of media. The proposition tabled by the magazine was that the internet is making journalism better rather than worse, with Rosen arguing in favor of the proposition and Carr arguing against it. In the end, neither one wins -- or both do -- because with journalism (as with so many other things) the internet is simply an accelerator, amplifying both the good and the bad.

Continue reading on GigaOM

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-26 10:31

Just a few short months ago the arrival of the iPad was being hailed as the saviour of the newspaper and magazine business. After the initial enthusiasm the realisation that apps are not a simple quick fix for the media industries malaise has led to a rapid growth in cynicism and caution. It reminds of the early response of the magazine industry to the emergence of the web: "It's interesting but there is no money in it - so we will wait and see."

Continue reading on TheMediaBriefing

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Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-25 11:20

Local media companies currently generate less than 5% of the revenue from the rapidly-growing group deals industry, but media partnerships represent the fastest growing sector of that business. The local players' ace in the hole, according to experts gathered Monday and Tuesday at BIA/Kelsey's Deals 3D conference in San Francisco: community connections and "feet on the street."

Continue reading on NetNewsCheck

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-25 11:05

AS long as we have had tabloids, we have had tabloid scandals.

Weighing in on the spate of scandals plaguing the British tabloid press, one commentator in 1936 acidly condemned what he called "the almost unbelievable indecency of the intrusion of the tabloid newspaper into people's private lives." Surely only the most degraded, low-minded people, he claimed, could produce this kind of news.

Continue reading in the New York Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-22 10:04

While the dark days of journalism have receded a bit -- it was only three years ago that layoffs were a weekly occurrence, and serious people discussed the closure of the New York Times -- the business is still very much in a state of chaotic flux. The so-called war between new and old media rages on among the pundits, with Facebook supplanting Google News as the new bogeyman. But if you look past the hype, a bumper crop of new jobs and new ways of reporting have taken root, created by people who are willing to throw themselves into the breach and experiment.

Continue reading on New York Magazine

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-22 09:52

Facebook has a war on its hands, and Mark Zuckerberg knows it. Practically overnight, Google+ has gone from a rumor to a thriving community with over 10 million members. With some 700 million members of its own, Facebook is thinking less and less about how to grow that number and more about how to get current users to live more of their lives within its virtual walls.

Continue reading on Forbes

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-21 10:55

Developer Phillip Mendonça-Vieira "accidentally collected about 12,000 screenshots of the front page of the nytimes.com" between September 2010 and July 2011. His computer took one image every 30 minutes.

What did he do with the treasure trove?

Continue reading on Business Insider

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-21 10:38

As more people buy e-readers and download books through digital stores, some news organizations are finding they can capitalize on their expertise and archives of information by quickly publishing e-books related to big stories.

The Washington Post and ABC News each generated books about the killing of Osama bin Laden shortly after the news broke.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-20 14:05

by Alan D. Mutter

Like an unchecked oil spill, the toxic and oozing News Corp. scandal is staining the already less than stellar image of the rest of the press, too.

On my semi-annual visit to friends and family in the Midwest, I was asked time and again how frequently American news media hack into the mobile phones of unsuspecting celebrities, politicians and crime victims.

Continue reading on Reflections of a Newsosaur

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-20 13:58

Social networks have proved to be incredible distribution platforms for real-time news and continue to fascinate journalists as communication tools. It's no surprise that many media professionals have jumped quickly on the Google+ band wagon to explore its potential for journalism.

Continue reading on Mashable

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-19 09:44

You may not have heard of Alden Global Capital, but it has become a significant investor in media companies, including Tribune Co., MediaNews and Philadelphia Media Network.

"They kind of, along the way, supplanted [investment firm] Angelo Gordon as a lead force in private equity ownership of distressed newspapers," said Poynter's Rick Edmonds.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-19 09:36

By Vadim Lavrusik, Journalist Program Manager & Betsy Cameron, Data Analyst

To enable journalists to better utilize Facebook in their distribution, reporting and storytelling, we conducted a study looking at how people were engaging with Journalist Pages on Facebook. We hope that the findings, which focus on post dynamics, engagement and activity, will provide journalists with some best practices and insights on optimizing their engagement and distribution on Facebook to better reach their audiences.

Continue reading on Facebook

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-18 11:02

(Reuters) - Britain's celebrities might no longer have to worry about the News of the World hacking phones or rifling their bins, but the manner of the paper's demise shows controlling information is getting much more difficult.

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp may have hoped that cozy relationships with Britain's police and political parties would be enough to avoid too close an investigation of persistent allegations that the paper's journalists had broken the law.

Continue reading on Reuters

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-18 10:54

by Julie Moos

Aggregation has been core to this website's success for the last decade. Our most popular feature since 1999 has been a blog that earns its iconic place in journalism by highlighting the most interesting and important news for a passionate audience. (In case you haven't caught on, that blog is Romenesko.)

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-14 17:38

When the New York Times first began talking about creating a metered paywall for its website last year, the company was quick to note that social media links would be exempt in order to keep the traffic flowing. Hoping to get a better sense of who shares links and why, the NYT commissioned a study that breaks down the types of people who share links and offered an overview of some recent marketing campaigns that appeared to hit the "buzz" mark.

Continue reading on paidContent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-14 17:26

Defending the motion
Jay Rosen
Author, blogger and journalism professor at New York University
The internet is improving journalism by driving towards zero the costs of getting it to people, and by vastly reducing the capital requirements for quality production. This has opened the market to more players, allowing more ideas to be tried.

Against the motion
Nicholas Carr
Author, blogger and writer-in-residence at the University of California, Berkeley
The internet, by altering the underlying economics of the news business, has thinned the ranks of professional journalists. Has the net created other modes of reporting to fill the gap? The answer, alas, is equally straightforward: no.

Access the debate on Economist.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-14 09:25

by Andy Boyle

In case you didn't know, many news organizations are looking to hire web developers to help create awesome stuff online. And as this list of 19 job openings might imply, news organizations are having a difficult time trying to find people to fill these gigs.

One of the reasons for this difficulty, I believe, is because journalism students are not learning the necessary skills during their college years and internships to meet the minimum requirements of these jobs.

Continue reading on andymboyle.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-14 09:03


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