Date

Mon - 11.12.2017


April 2011

Among trends in the media industry, one of the most promising is the increasing readiness of consumers to pay for content, says Marcel Fenez, a Global Entertainment and Media Leader for PricewaterhouseCoopers, in a presentation of many of those trends.

Mr Fenez made his presentation at WAN-IFRA's Publish Asia 2011, being held in Bangkok from 27 to 29 April.

"They are giving us hints about what they want to pay for," he says.

"They're telling us three things - I will pay for convenience, I will obviously pay for quality, because one of the things we know about free content is that very often the quality is not very high, and they're also telling us they'll pay for a higher quality experience," Mr Fenez says.

Regarding the last point, Mr Fenez used the example of someone paying a high price to go to a concert yet illegally downloading music from the internet. "Why will people pay $150 to go to a gig but not pay for music? What they tell us is, it's the enriched experience. Content alone is not enough, it has to be more than that.

"Though content is king, we have to rely on more than just content," he says. "We have to provide convenience, we have to provide quality, and we have to provide the experience."

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-29 14:08

Guardian News & Media is ending the project it launched in 2010 to try and figure out the future of local journalism.

"Unfortunately, while the blogs have found engaged local readerships and had good editorial impact, the project is not sustainable in its present form," writes the publisher's digital engagement head Meg Pickard.

Continue reading on paidContent.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-29 13:56

While newspaper circulation in much of the world declines, it continues to grow in India. And the prospect for future growth is excellent, says Ravi Dhariwal, CEO of Bennet, Coleman & Co., the publisher of The Times of India.

Mr Dhariwal delivered the keynote address at WAN-IFRA's Publish Asia 2011, being held in Bangkok from 27 to 29 April.
India's population continues to grow, as does its literacy rate, so future readership is also likely to increase, he says. Advertising growth also has great potential.

For the Times of India, it's all about brand, he says. The 173-year old paper "tries to capture our country on a particular day and the people's aspirations," he says. We don't consider the Prime Minister or the President as the leaders of India, we treat the reader as the CEO."

In a wide-ranging keynote address that presented a case study of the Times' success, Mr Dhariwal pointed to the following elements that characterizes the Times of India brand:

- It doesn't take itself too seriously. "While we do a lot of serious stuff, we don't take ourselves too seriously at all," he says. "We try a lot of different things and have fun. It generates a tremendous response."
- It has an optimistic outlook.
- It celebrates success.
- In believes in diversity.
- It provides shorter stories.
- It is affordable.
- It establishes connections. "We believe a lot of people have things to say - they're not writers, they're not editors. But we invite guest editors to have free rein to make the newspaper they like."

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-28 17:23

by Gary Randazzo

Virtually all newspapers have websites that look good and have great functionality. So why aren't they all producing acceptable amounts of profit? The question probably should be asked differently, "What do consumers and advertisers expect from newspapers?" Then ask, "What do they expect from the Internet?"

Continue reading on Editor & Publisher

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-27 16:58

Mobile advertising is growing fast, but mobile banner ads generally annoy users--which means they don't serve advertisers well and so are doubly bad news for news orgs. But the Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Wa.) has built its own system for creating mobile-friendly ads augmented with useful information for people on the go.

Ryan Pitts, senior editor of digital media for the paper, says these ads are selling better than expected...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-27 16:39

Las Vegas Sun reporters Marshall Allen and Alex Richards were given two years to achieve one goal: "Find out what's right, and wrong, about our local health care delivery system."

The 2.9 million public documents that they examined and hundreds of interviews that they conducted exposed thousands of preventable medical mistakes in Las Vegas hospitals. The Nevada legislature responded with six pieces of legislation that are still up for debate and, this week the Pulitzer Prize Board named Allen, Richards and The Sun a finalist in local reporting.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-27 09:25

In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, local newspapers in the quake-hit Tohoku region suffered massive power outages, forcing them to suspend operations of the servers for their websites and bringing down local Internet connections. As access to their news sites was blocked, newspaper publishers turned to Twitter to continue to send out disaster-related information - especially detailed reports of damage and information closely related to people's daily lives.

Continue reading on NSK News Bulletin Online

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-27 09:08

by Matt DeRienzo

We're adding a full-time curator position at The Register Citizen.

Jenny Golfin, whose duties have included morning shift web updating, social media management and reporting, will be devoted full-time to this new role. Her mission will be to provide our audience with links to breaking and comprehensive news and information relevant to their community and interests.

Continue reading on NewspaperTurnaround.Com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-26 10:45

We've seen a flood of innovations over the past few years in journalism on the web: from technology and the delivery of news to new forms of storytelling and reporting. But making those innovations happen has been neither fast nor easy. How do you manage meaningful change that sticks? That question drives our research.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-26 10:10

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (CNN) -- Garum Tesfaye is one of Addis Ababa's "newspaper landlords," a group of entrepreneurs in the Ethiopian capital who rent out papers to people too poor to buy them.

Surrounded by worn-out copies of old newspapers, stacks of gossip magazines and the crisp print of the latest news, Tesfaye sits attentively, checking his watch every now and then.

Continue reading on CNN

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-21 09:21

For the first time in the 95-year history of the Pulitzers, no one won for breaking news coverage in writing. Isn't that what newspapers are meant to do? Break news? And yet no clear majority could be raised among the judges to crown one of the three finalists the winner.

Continue reading on blogPost

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-21 09:10

by John Reinan

The future of newspapers in the Twin Cities could hinge on events in Southern California. Sound crazy? Let me explain.

One of California's largest newspapers, the Orange County Register, is for sale. Industry analysts expect a couple of companies to bid aggressively for it: Tribune and MediaNews Group.

Continue reading on MinnPost.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-20 11:09

Mail Online, Associated Newspapers' online network, has overtaken the Huffington Post to become the second most popular news website in the world in March, according to new figures from metrics firm comScore.

Arianna Huffington's groundbreaking news and opinion website, which was bought by AOL for $315m (£193m) in February, was leapfrogged by Mail Online, which is now second only to the New York Times in ComScore's "newspapers" category.

Continue reading on MediaGuardian

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-20 10:33

by David Carr

In 2008, when I last saw Michael Klingensmith, he was sitting in a corner office on the 34th floor of the Time Warner building, one of three powerful executives who controlled Time Inc., the biggest magazine publisher in the world.

It was the only company that Mr. Klingensmith, an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago, had ever worked for. After three decades, including stops at Sports Illustrated and Time, he was on the short list to become the next chief executive.

Continue reading in the New York Times

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-19 09:47

The headline really writes itself: "The Brits are Coming." It's an Oscars night boast translated for a multimedia world. It means that BBC World News America is now available on public broadcasting stations all over the US (with more cash going in to drive up BBC.com's monthly online visiting figures over 15m).

Continue reading on guardian.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-19 09:38

Here's how newspapers sell what they do to would-be readers.

You can get the whole paper, now sometimes including digital access. We'll sell you Sunday only, or the weekend, or 7-day, but you have to take our whole paper. That's what we sell; that's our one-size-fits-all product. It fit your grandparents and your parents, so why shouldn't it fit you?

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-18 10:35

When the worst earthquake in Japan's history and the subsequent tsunami knocked out all power in the city of Ishinomaki in Miyagi Prefecture, editors at the Ishinomaki Hibi Shimbun, the city's daily newspaper, printed news of the disaster the only way they could: by pen and paper.

For six consecutive days after the twin disasters, reporters used flashlights and marker pens to write their stories on poster-size paper and posted the "newspapers" at the entrances of relief centers around the city.

Continue reading on Newseum.org

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-18 10:25

Flexible, roll-up digital screens capable of displaying full colour images are just three to five years away, according to a research firm behind the technology.

Have you ever wished you could roll up your iPad like a newspaper while traveling on the go? No? Us neither.

Continue reading on PC & Tech Authority

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-15 09:43

by Meghan Peters

The recent launch of The New York Times paywall has prompted debates about the viability and fairness of paying for news online. Are publications unrealistic about subscription prices? Should the community rally to support journalism? Is it worth paying for?

But the biggest question that lingers in an everyday web reader's mind is much simpler: "Will clicking on this link bring me to a story?"

Continue reading on Mashable

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-15 09:20

When it comes to launching a newspaper app, the first priority is to define your target group and understand their desires, says Romanus Otte, General Manager of Welt Online in Germany, which produces the country's leading news app.

Mr Otte presents numerous insights in his presentation at WAN-IFRA Digital Media Europe, held in London from 11-13 April.

For Die Welt, the target was the modern newspaper reader - with the emphasis on "newspaper" -- someone who values professional journalism, loves to read, wants curated content, knows what is possible on connected devices, but is neither a digital native nor avant garde.

"The newspaper readers praise us for bringing the newspaper they love to the iPad," says Mr Otte. "The digital natives criticise us, saying this is not what the iPad is for, 'I want the internet there.'"

Die Welt's app is the market leader, downloaded to nearly half of all iPads in Germany. It tops all categories in the app store in Germany and was chosen App of the Year by iTunes in Germany for 2010.

Die Welt on iPad is much like a newspaper but is always up to date, includes videos, can be stored, shared and contacted easily, and provides tomorrow's issue the night before. It sells for 15.99 Euros a month or 129.99 a year.

Tags

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-14 10:04

by Mike Masnick

A few weeks ago, when the NYTimes' Bill Keller bizarrely compared Arianna Huffington to a Somali pirate, we noted that journalism is a form of aggregation as well. After all, you're taking content from the people who actually make news, and aggregating it into a publication. It appears that others are catching on to this as well. A bunch of folks have passed along this blog post from the Zunguzungu blog, which notes that journalists are aggregating too.

Continue reading on Techdirt

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-14 09:53

If you haven't yet launched an app, do it quickly, just to see if your audience really wants them, says Renate Nyborg, Head of Business Development for A&N Mobile & TV in the United Kingdom.

Speaking at WAN-IFRA Digital Media Europe, being held in London from 11-13 April, Ms Nyborg says that's what A&N did with its Metro title - and the result from the simple exercise was a new apps business, tailored for the profile of Metro readers.

That first app was a simple PDF of the daily paper. "The key was doing something very quickly to get an idea of the appetite of our mobile readers for a mobile app," says Ms Nyborg. The result was 350,000 downloads.

Once the company learned its audience wanted apps, it started to develop more sophisticated offerings, ultimately leading to the creation of Metro Apps, a new business dedicated to lifestyle apps and games that appeal to the Metro audience and benefit from the brand.

"The key thing is to play to your strengths and build your strategy on insight," Ms Nyborg says. "It's not really about just jumping on the bandwagon like people did a few years ago on social media. It's about defining your audience, how they use content, and then building something that fits in to their behaviour."

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-13 09:54

Microsoft's new Bing iPad app, released Thursday, does more than search -- it begins to remake the newspaper experience in digital form.

The app is not being marketed as a news platform, but journalists should consider it one because it offers a great local information utility for the iPad age.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-13 09:01

The debate over print versus digital isn't useful anymore, says Kevin Beatty, CEO of A&N Media and Managing Director of Associated Newspapers in the United Kingdom, in a keynote address to some 250 participants from 39 countries attending the first WAN-IFRA Digital Media Europe conference.

"We consider it pointless and an unnecessary introspection," he says. "Instead we have sought to change our business in anticipation of our customers' expectations.

"Although there remain many uncertainties, the one thing that we are sure of is that change, although always a constant, will continue at a phenomenal rate and we need to keep up."

A&N Media, the parent company of The Mail and other titles, reaches 41 percent of all adults in the UK every month across its platforms. Thanks to multimedia, newspaper companies now reach larger audiences than ever.

And these audiences are no longer described by geography, Mr Beatty says - of the 65 million unique users of Mail Online monthly, 42 percent come from outside the United Kingdom.

But building an audience isn't an end in itself, Mr Beatty says. It is interaction among its brands and platforms that is proving to be profitable. "Brand interaction builds a richer, more valuable customer profile," he says.

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-11 16:52


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