Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


September 2010

Spain's Arab community will have access by the end of October to Andalus Press, the first Arab-language weekly in the country, La Verdad reported Tuesday.

The newspaper will be published by Andalus Media, a news agency specialized in the Spanish-Arab coverage, "to satisfy the information needs" of the Arab-speaking residents, said publisher Said Ida Hassan.

The agency launched in February an online publication that covers topics of interest of this community, La Voz de Barcelona informed. However, Hassan explained he decided to create a weekly after a study conducted by the agency showed 94 percent of the Arabs living in Spain would prefer to read a newspaper in their language and that 73 percent liked to received their news on a print format.

The Andalus Press will have an initial circulation of 50,000 copies and will be distributed every Friday in the mosques located in Madrid and the autonomous communities of Catalunya, Valencia and Andalucia, Comunicar.info detailed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-30 23:22

The Boston Globe announced that it would start a new paid Web site in the later half of 2011. The web site, called BostonGlobe.com, will be in addition to the existing, Boston.com, which the company calls a "two-brand" strategy, New York Times reported in a blog.

The new site will include all news and feature stories published in the print edition, while Boston.com will remain free and offer local news and classified advertising, but access to full stories, commentary, features and other content will be limited, The Associated Press reported.

Readers' registration for either site will be required, but at different points.

Boston.com will provide a limited amount of content to be viewed before asking readers to register. BostonGlobe.com, however, will require readers to register and subscribe immediately for its paid service. Those who subscribe the printed edition will receive a free BostonGlobe.com subscription, New York Times reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-30 22:44

The Washington Post and Yahoo News have collaborated to launch "The Fast Fix," a daily video feature starring Chris Cillizza, managing editor of PostPolitics.com and author of the Post's blog The Fix, according to the UpshotBlog on Yahoo News. The video feature will offer analysis on the day's political news in 60 seconds.

While bringing together reader submissions, social media, and Cillizza's own intellectual curiosity to provide better analysis and insights on politics, the co-produced and co-branded video feature will offer nonpartisan political commentary covering the "so what?" and the "now what?" through fast, visually active analysis of both over-reported issues and important but under-reported political topics, according to the press release posted on MarketWatch.com.

Image: MediaBistro.com

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-30 20:13

In an effort to tap the mobile platform for revenue, Australian media group Fairfax has unveiled iPhone apps based on the subscription model for its newspapers, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, Brisbane Today and WAToday, the Sydney Morning Herald reported yesterday.

While most newspaper publishers have opted for a one-off fee payment system, the Fairfax group is the first publisher to have launched an iPhone app based on the subscription model, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. Readers can download the apps from the Apple iTunes store at a monthly charge of $2.49 and those who opt for subscriptions over a six-month period are entitled to a 15 percent discount, and therefore will pay only $12.99.

Image: AdNews Australia

"It's the first move by Fairfax Media to charge for its online news content on a mobile phone," Brian McCarthy, chief executive at the Fairfax group, was quoted by The Australian as saying. "The development of the apps is a milestone in our ongoing strategy around the delivery of content through digital platforms."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-30 19:36

U.S. media giant AOL announced yesterday that it has bought popular technology blog TechCrunch for nearly US$25 million, said two sources familiar with the venture, Bloomberg reported. However, the San Jose Mercury News speculated that the figure might be anywhere between $25 to $45 million.

"It was either time for us to start investing a lot more money in things like technology and marketing - which probably meant raising a venture round - or to sell and simply partner with somebody who could do that," said TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington. "AOL has a very robust, large blog network that shows they have the software side nailed. So it solves a real problem for us from the technology side."

The deal might have been part of a plan to help restore AOL's diminished market value and subscriber base, Bloomberg pointed out. According to the Los Angeles Times, acquiring TechCrunch was a way to expand AOL's presence in the technology sphere. The Internet provider already owns TechCrunch's contender Engadget, which it bought in 2005. Further, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong explained that the tech aspect might appeal to advertisers.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-30 16:01

Purchasers of mobile telephones can look, but not buy, their mobile devices soon. According to mocoNews.net, Google has recently launched a new Android store for "window-shopping only."

The store will be a "database that tracks all of the Android handsets in the market place allowing customers to conduct comparisons across handset makers and carriers," according to the online article. Google also launched the Google Phone Gallery, which will be like a phone showcase without actually selling anything. Google learned its lesson when it underestimated "how hard it would be to sell unlocked devices at full price directly to consumers," states Moco News.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-30 15:39

The International Herald Tribune will launch a news weekly supplement in association with Reuters tomorrow MediaGuardian reported yesterday. The weekly supplement, called Middle East with Reuters, can be found every Thursday in the IHT's Middle East print editions.

The inaugural four-page issue of the weekly supplement will feature dedicated regional news, business, opinion and culture coverage from IHT, The New York Times and Reuters correspondents, while focusing on emerging trends and themes throughout the region, according to the press release posted on AFXNews.com today. This weekly issue is meant to complement the current coverage of the Middle East with analysis of the daily newspaper and authoritative world reporting.

Image: Guardian.co.uk

"The joint launch emphasises the way in which large media organisations are now prepared to team up in order to reach wider audiences," MediaGuardian pointed out. The weekly supplement will draw on the coverage of more than 200 Reuters journalists covering the Middle East at local and international level.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-29 17:04

U.S. publishers Gannett Company Inc., The New York Times Co. and The Washington Post Co. have invested US$12 million in a start-up company called Ongo, which is developing a news aggregation website that will draw content from major publishers, The Wall Street Journal revealed today.

"We are building Ongo to reflect the many ways consumers prefer to read, organize and share digital news," Ongo's founder and chief executive officer Alex Kazim stated in a press release. The service is expected to go online by the end of the year.

In a statement, The Washington Post explained that its investment was lead by the company's interest "in experimenting with different ways to experience digital news and information." The three media groups have been discussing the joint project with Kazin, a former eBay executive who was president of Skype before it was sold, for more than a year, a spokesperson of The New York Times said to The Wall Street Journal.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-29 17:04

Having recently restructured and deviated focus to digital media operations, U.S. national daily USA Today unveiled its first standalone glossy women's health publication, Fresh: Women's Health Guide, from its YourLife stable, Editor &Publisher reported yesterday.

The magazine will cover everything about health, "From advice on how to get a good night's sleep to how to live healthy and spend less," according to the press release. The magazine is available at newsstands nationally for US$7.99 and can also be purchased online.

Image Source: USAToday.com

The inaugural edition of the women's health magazine features soccer star Brandi Chastain talking about ways to stay fit and healthy over 40, HGTV's David Bromstad offering tips on making a room pop without spending a fortune, a special breast cancer section on ways to fight back and, 61 ways to live healthy and spend less among others, according to the press release posted on PRNewswire.com.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-29 16:56

Facebook drives 13 times more traffic to French news sites than Twitter, which only accounts for one click per 100 visits, according to a study conducted by AT Internet Institute, paidContent reported today.

Among the top 12 leading news sites in the country, Facebook is responsible for 1.3 percent of visits and Twitter for 0.1 percent. By way of comparison, researchers also looked at the traffic driven by Google and found that the search engine' share is 40.6 percent or 30 times greater than Facebook, AT Internet explained in a press release.

Graphic source: AT Internet Institute

"This figure remains high, but we should not forget that the main function of a search engine, such as Google, is to suggest links to Internet users. This is not the case for Facebook," the company reminded.

The low impact of Twitter is becoming a trend in some countries. According to paidContent, a study released in March showed that the 140-character site only drives 0.14 percent of the traffic to U.S. news sites.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-29 16:52

The Russian version of prominent magazine Newsweek may soon be published by the ONEXIM Group, an investment fund that also owns shares in the country's media firm RBK (which has a business daily paper and TV channel), Lenta.Ru reported today. An unofficial ONEXIM source told journalists that the representatives from Axel Springer, current publisher of Newsweek Russia, have already talked the issue over with ONEXIM heads. However, ONEXIM owner Mikhail Prohorov did not participate in the discussions.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-29 16:46

UK daily The Times has lost an additional 120,000 online readers following the installment of a paywall, the latest comScore data shows, Media Tel reported Monday. According to Thinq, the News International-owned daily also saw a 1.67 drop in print readership, reaching 494,205 - the first time since April 1994 that the figure has been under 500,000.

The title had 1.459 million unique visitors in August, a 7.6 drop from 1.579 million in July, when the paywall was launched, according to WallBlog.co.uk. The total minutes users spent on the site dropped by 16 percent from six million in July to five million in August, Beehive reported. Further, total page views dropped by 22 percent, from nine million to seven million, month-to-month.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-29 16:31

Australian lawmakers have proposed a new law that would allow journalists to conceal the identity of their sources, The Associated Press reported. Currently, journalists risk being jailed for contempt of court if they attempt to protect their sources' identity.

The first time Parliament convened since last month's elections, Andrew Wilkie introduced the bill, and Attorney General Robert McClelland said that his center-left government will support the bill, the AP specified. It would allow journalists to refuse to identify their sources in court, and McClelland told reporters at Parliament House that "we will start from the premise that the court will presume that the confidentiality of the journalist's source is protected," the AP said.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-29 16:05

Kicking off an online revolution in traditional display advertising at Advertising Week in New York, AOL unveiled its display advertising initiative called Project Devil, which aims to transform online advertising by improvising on aesthetics, impact and interactivity of ads, NewsandTech.com reported yesterday.

Through this initiative, the company is aiming for a "fundamental redesign of the Web," which is incredibly "bold and ambitious," Jeff Levick, AOL's president of global advertising and strategy told MediaWeek.com. The company's two ad platforms namely- the company's mega ad network, Advertising.com and its popular ad-serving platform, AdTech will support growth of the Project Devil initiative.

Image Source: RealTimeAdvertisingWeek.com

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-28 20:10

The Huffington Post's most touted citizen journalist, Mayhill Fowler, has quit the Huffington Post, according to a blog posted on Washington Post. She is known for scooping the pros twice during the 2008 presidential campaign, recording Bill Clinton's tirade against Vanity Fair writer Todd Purdum and quoting Barack Obama saying working class voters "cling to guns or religion."

Fowler took to her own blog to explain why she quit: "I want to be paid for my time and effort - or at a minimum, to get a little remuneration in return for the money I spend myself in order to do original reportage. I would not expect to be paid for punditry. The Huffington Post business model is to provide a platform for 6,000 opinionators to hold forth. Point of view is cheap. I would never expect to be paid there when the other 5,999 are not. However, the journalism pieces I have done in the past year seem to me as good as anything HuffPost's paid reporters Sam Stein and Ryan Grim produce. Why do they get money, and I do not? I don't recall either of them writing the story about Barack Obama waxing large on "clinging to guns and religion," which seems more and more as time goes by to be the one big story out of the last presidential election to live on. Or at least it is the one that journalists and pundits are quoting regularly now."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-28 19:44

Having re-launched 16 of its news websites after overhaul operations recently, The Sun-Times Media group plans to deliver the United States' largest sports monthly magazine, called Athlon Sports, for its readers beginning October 21, Editor & Publisher reported yesterday. Seven million copies of the monthly magazine will be circulated nationwide by the media group's 47 newspapers.

The magazine will appear each month in the Thursday editions of the Chicago Sun-Times, the Southtown Star, the Post-Tribune, the Courier News of Elgin, the Beacon-News of Aurora and the Herald-News of Joliet, the Naperville Sun, the Lake County News-Sun, the Pioneer Press and The Doings Newspapers, NewsandTech.com reported yesterday.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-28 19:35

A survey conducted by the Association of Online Publishers found that UK-based publishers are more focused on mobile platforms and tablet devices to help next year's digital ventures, pointing out that innovative technology is "at the heart of their business development plans over the next 12 months" and will promote "dynamic growth," a press release stated.

Ninety-one percent of the participants said they are hoping to improve revenues from mobile devices whereas 86 percent are enthusiastic about the launch of tablet computers, The Independent reported yesterday. Other opportunities publishers saw include high speed broadband connection, social networks, paid content, e-Commerce and behavioral targeting. Sixty percent considered it to be necessary to offer online content that is local, BCS mentioned.

Image: MediaGuardian

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 18:22

Taiwan News, an English-language newspaper that has been published in Taiwan since 1949, will be available online-only starting Friday, the Central News Agency reported yesterday.

"The unthinkable is finally upon us," said Taiwan News' President Jack Wong during a press conference explaining the daily had taken the lead in the country by being the first digital-only newspaper.

Photo source: Central News Agency
Wong said the new site will be launched today under the name Taiwan News Multimedia Newspaper and it will include "previously impossible integration of text, color images, and sound in a digital multimedia format."

The company will also publish the Taiwan News International Financial and a Cultural Monthly online magazine. According to Central News Agency, these publications will be available in eight languages while the Taiwan News will continue to be published in English and Mandarin.

The company said the multimedia edition of the newspaper as well as the magazine would soon be delivered through e-mail at no cost to those who register online.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-28 18:02

Trinity Mirror is planning to cut four editor positions in its Celtic weekly titles and replace them with a single editor-in-chief, Press Gazette reported.

Media Wales, the unit which publishes the papers, informed its employees of this restructure plan among its Celtic titles and the decision to put the editorial teams under the immediate control of one editor, BBC News reported.

The four editors currently cover seven titles including the Merthyr Express, Rhymney Valley Express, Gwent Gazette, Pontypridd Observer, Rhondda Leader, Glamorgan Gazette and Cynon Valley Leader.

"Since the introduction of our multimedia newsroom in 2008, we have been working with the weekly titles to produce our Celtic newspaper series in the most effective way possible for our readers and advertisers," said Alan Edmunds, publishing director of Media Wales in a memo to staff. "It is our belief that the future development and operational requirements of these titles as well as the needs of the communities that they engage will be better served by a new approach, taking advantage of the opportunities afforded by our multimedia news operations."

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-28 18:00

Rupert Murdoch's UK-based publishing group News International embarked on a multi-million pound advertising campaign beginning yesterday for its national Sunday tabloid paper News of The World (NOTW), MediaGuardian reported. The initiative, which touts the title's reputation for exclusive content, is being launched across outdoor and television platforms before a digital paywall is raised next month.

The TV ad, made by WCRS agency, includes the slogan "The Big Stories Start Here" and will strive to convince users that NOTW produces quality material. According to Brand Republic, the three-week long campaign will include some of the tabloid's biggest scoops, such as football team Chelsea's player John Terry's affair and Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson paying for access to her ex-husband Prince Andrew.

The paywall will incorporate a £1.99 (US$3.15) charge for a four-week subscription to online content, according to MediaGuardian. Users will have to pay £1 ($1.58) for a day's access while the iPad edition will cost £1.19 ($1.89) per week.

World-wide media and marketing company Mindshare was in charge of media handling and buying for the campaign, Brand Republic added.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 17:55

According to the head of Gawker Media, Nick Denton, online media need to become more like television, states an article on paidContent.org. "It means a screen which is less constrained by the need to have three or four ads and every single bit of content on one screen," Denton was quoted as saying in the article. paidContent speculated whether Denton was making reference to a future Gawker redesign.

There will always be space for writers, however, even if just to put text around a video. He expressed frustration with blogs, noting that for the Gizmodo iPhone 4 story, "we had to cease publishing for six hours to keep this story at the top of the page." Gawker's goal is to focus more on new media and less on old media. "I always say that our readers are interested in [Mark] Zuckerberg, not [Mort] Zuckerman," the article quotes Denton as saying.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-28 17:21

UK supermarket chain Asda and News International, the British arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., have announced a new deal that features the return of NI-owned The Sunday Times to 260 Asda stores, following a week-long disappearance, MediaWeek reported today.

NI recently increased the cover price of the weekend title by £0.20 to £2.20. Last week, the publisher decided that it would have £0.183 of the price increase while retailers just a little over 1 pence or £ 0.017, which constitutes 23.5 percent. Asda responded by claiming that it should have £0.5, or 25 percent of the cover price, as it previously did.

Asda pointed out that NI made an "acceptable proposal." However an NI official said that the publisher "sold to all retailers at the same price," MediaWeek informed. If thedeal did in fact go through, Asda's competitors such as Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons might be suffering defeat, Media Week suggested.

NI owns The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of The World. According to the Guardian, the collective circulation of the titles amounts to 37 percent of the country's newspaper circulation. In 2009, The Times and The Sunday Times saw losses of nearly £87.7 million.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 00:16

Gérard Proust, head of the National Union of Press Distributors (UNDP) in France, has called on the government to provide €4,000 in transitional aid to newspaper sales merchants, he mentioned in an interview with Le Figaro last week. The same figure was provided last year, but as the number of newsstands plunges, newspaper sales outlets may be losing hope in the industry.

"Transitional aid is not enough. I am officially calling on the State to continue its effort. I am aware of the financial obligations of the state," Proust said. "But I think that today it is necessary to send a strong signal to our sector by renewing the aid this year." Even though other markets, such as books, may show positive figures, copy sales of the press sector continue to dwindle. However, the jump in distribution and audience numbers indicate that there is a public need towards information and that consumers are still interested in paid print content, Proust explains.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 00:02

As consumer reading preferences increasingly shift to mobile devices such as the iPad and smartphones, The Associated Press is looking for a means to harness the mobile medium's potentials by bringing circulars and coupon inserts to newspaper apps, AdAge.com reported today.

Tentatively called "iCircular," the app is currently being developed in collaboration with Verve Wireless and will work in conjunction with the AP's white-label app platform. Jane Seagrave, senior vice president and chief revenue officer at the AP confirmed its development, but declined to provide any further information saying, "the development process wasn't far enough along," according to AdAge. Member publishers can also publish apps under their own brand with the help of this application.

"Ad circulars ... are extremely important to almost every newspaper," James Moroney, CEO and publisher at the Dallas Morning News was quoted as saying by AdAge. "With the decline of classified print advertising, as far as printed newspaper ad-revenue categories go, it is, if not the largest for a lot of papers, always going to be one of the two or three largest categories."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-27 21:28


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