Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


June 2010

The Internet is the platform most Canadians use to consume media, and they consider it twice as influential as any other source for news, the Fleishman-Hillard 2010 Digital Influence Index revealed, The Vancouver Sun reported today.

"Compared to the 27 percent of Canadian consumers who say that TV is important to their lives, 54 percent say that the Internet is most important," Fleishman-Hillard stated in a press release.

The data shows that Canadians spend an average of 37 hours per week consuming media and 34 percent of this time - equivalent to 16.6 hours -- is used online. While television is the second most consumed news source, with an average of 12 hours a week, Canadians only spend two hours reading newspapers.

"It's not that consumers aren't getting news, but they now prefer it to be delivered online. In Canada, 42 percent don't read printed magazines and 28 percent don't read the print version of newspapers," The Vancouver Sun explained.

Regardless of the time Canadians spend online, their attitude towards the Internet is "cautiously trusting." According to designtaxi.com, "Canadians would rather seek and heed advice given by friends or family in real-life."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-30 23:09

The CEO of online premium video website Hulu said today that he thinks in 10 years, most premium content will be free to users, and supported by advertising, Dow Jones Newswires reported.

Some video content is expected to do well in a subscription model; in fact, Hulu launched its online subscription service Hulu Plus just yesterday. The service costs US$9.99 a month and allows customers to view television shows on PCs, mobile devices and TVs. However, CEO Jason Kilar told Dow Jones he is convinced most content in the future will be paid for through advertising.

In the United States, Hulu is second only to YouTube for video content, and is in its third quarter of profitability. Last year, revenues reached $100 million.

Under Hulu Plus, subscribers will be able to access full current seasons of most broadcast TV programmes, instead of just a few, which is what is currently available for non-paying customers, Newsweek reported.

Users will also be able to watch films and television shows on devices including the iPad, iPhone, Xbox 360 and Playstation 3. However, cable programming will not be available, and neither will sports content.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-30 23:03

The Portuguese media group Controlinveste this week closed down its free newspaper Global Notícias and the national daily 24 Horas, Newspaper Innovation reported yesterday.

The group announced the closings through an internal memo, according to Diário de Notícias. "The administration justified its decision as the result of a 'deep structural change of the market of the press,' which 'demands strategic decisions that will lead to new business models," the newspaper explained.

Nonetheless, data collected at the beginning of the year had shown that 24 Horas' circulation was down by 51.22 percent compared with 2009, Correio da Manha reported.

Meanwhile, the decision to close Global Noticias, which was launched in 2007 and had a circulation of 140,000 copies, comes one month after the free daily changed its graphic design and managing direction, Publicitas noted.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-30 22:58

The online audience in the United Kingdom went up by 1.9 million over the last year. More than half of new audiences are over the age of 50, according to the new data by UKOM, Media Guardian reported.

In May, online users grew by 5 percent to 38.8 million, compared to 36.9 million in the same period in 2009.

New users aged 50 or above exceeded 1 million, accounting for 53 percent of that growth. Most of them (722,000) were male while 15 percent (284,000) were female.

Women between the age of 21 and 34 followed next with 14 percent growth, or 272,000 new users. Girls between 12 and 20 gained 12 percent, or 231,000, Expert Reviews reported.

"There is still a perception that the net is youth-centric but this is clearly not the reality. The fact that one in four Britons who use the Internet today are 50 to 64 years old proves it is no longer the sole preserve of the young and technical 'literati'," said Nielsen analyst Alex Burmaster in an interview.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-30 22:45

Three U.S. newspapers are set to introduce paywalls to their websites later this week, reports journalism.co.uk. The newspapers, The Tallahassee Democrat in Florida, the Spectrum in Utah, and Greenville News in South Carolina, will introduce a range of subscription packages on July 1. Gannett owns all three of the newspapers and the paywalls are reportedly part of the company's subscription trials.

On the Greenville News site, publisher Steven R. Brandt and executive editor John S. Pittman explain "content, regardless of the platform, was never 'free.' This new model will require Web users to pay for online content, either by selecting one of the subscription offers above, or purchasing a day pass to the GreenvilleOnline.com website. The difference is that now everyone will be paying for it, not just those who bought the print edition."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-30 19:49

The BBC online has become the fifth referral site to UK newspaper websites, as it "sent nearly two million unique visitors to the papers in April," paidContent reported yesterday.

Although Google remains the top global referral site with almost 40 million unique visitors, the data compiled by the Newspaper Marketing Agency shows that the BBC News site is sending as many readers as Bing, Microsoft's search engine. Direct hits are in second place after Google, with almost 27.5 million unique visitors.

Chart: via paidContent

The only news site that refers more visitors than the BBC is Drudge Report, a news aggregation website that contributes almost seven million referrals.

Overall, "The BBC News site is contributing nearly 2.3 percent of the total unique visitors the sites get from their top 20 sources," explained paidContent.

According to the Newspaper Marketing Agency's April report, other top traffic drivers are Yahoo, Stumbleupon.com, Facebook, Digg.com and Wikipedia.

The good news for the BBC comes two years after launching its Newstracker system, which gives readers a list of related news stories that have been published by the media.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-30 00:03

Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is angry with the Italian press for their news coverage during the G8 and G20 summits in Canada.

"Newspapers misinform. Readers should do a strike to teach those who write not to mock them," Berlusconi said yesterday at his arrival to Sao Paolo, where he is scheduled to meet with Brazilian president Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva, La Reppublica reported.

The Prime Minister said the accounts of the meetings published by the newspapers where "the exact opposite of the reality." "They are a mockery of the readers with a misinformation that has been going on for several days, from several months to date and it is inconceivable," quoted Il Sole 24 Ore.

Berlusconi's accusations coincided with press protests against his intention to approve a controversial law that would curb the use of wiretaps by the police. If passed, newspapers that publish transcripts of wiretapped conversations would face heavy fines.

According to the Global Post, Italian journalists and newspaper editors have called a strike for July 9, "while the CEO of the Rupert Murdoch-owned Sky Italy said he is 'ready to go to jail' if the new rules are approved."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-29 23:48

A newspaper subscription website, newspaper-subscription.co.uk, has been launched in the United Kingdom by ThreePM, which also runs a magazine subscription website, InternetRetailing.net reported today.

The website offers discounts for both UK and international newspapers, as well as news magazines. Titles available through the site include The Times and Sunday Times, the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, The Independent and Independent on Sunday, The Guardian, The Observer, The Weekly World Edition of the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph and The Economist.
"Although the online 'range retailer' is still significant, for many consumers it's more convenient to be able to look at titles in just the specific subject areas of interest to them. We now give consumers the choice of how they find what they want," Don Brown, ThreePM's business director, told InternetRetailing.net.

The company's magazine subscription site, subscription.co.uk, offers one and two-year subscriptions, with delivery available to the United Kingdom, Europe, or United States or the rest of the world, with varying prices due to delivery charges. Users can also give gift subscriptions through the site, and browse magazines by category.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-29 23:15

In its most successful product launch ever, Apple announced it has sold 1.7 million iPhone 4s in the first three days after putting it on the market in several countries, the Kansas City Star reported yesterday. In 2009, Apple sold 1 million units of its 3GS iPhone in the first three days.

However, even some people who pre-ordered the smartphone have had to wait, as Apple had to delay in-store sales to fulfill its preorders first. Seventy-seven percent of buyers queueing outside stores in the first few days were upgrading to the iPhone 4 from previous models, according research from U.S. analysis group Piper Jaffray and UK firm AQA. This means 23 percent of buyers are new to the iPhone, MediaGuardian noted.

"This is confirmation that Apple has another hit. Apple is competing with Google, which seems to have a new Android phone from another partner out every two weeks. Apple gets one chance a year to launch a new phone, and they hit it out of the park," Gene Munster, an analyst at Piper Jaffray, told USA Today.

New features on the iPhone 4 include video calling, 960-by-640 resolution, multiple apps usage, and HD video recording, according to Apple.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-29 23:03

A recent study at Ball State University has revealed that college students are annoyed by advertisements on their mobile phones, reports eMarketer.

The study of a primarily female group of students found surprisingly negative reactions to mobile ads. More than 40 percent were annoyed when they encountered mobile ads compared to a mere 1.2 percent who were pleased with the ads. However, most surprisingly, nearly three in 10 people said they were less likely to buy a product after seeing a mobile ad and a very small number said the ad would encourage them to buy.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-29 22:25

The Wall Street Journal plans to leverage its reputation in the United States for its technology coverage and will soon launch a new technology section for its European readers, Journalism.co.uk reported last week. The new section will cover technology business start-ups, entrepreneurs, gadgets and service activities in the tech business in Europe.

While the shape and structure of the upcoming tech section is still undecided, it will incorporate technology content from the United States edition and from the regional market as well, providing a mix of news and commentary that include "straightforward top quality reporting" supported by analysis on Heard on the Street and other blogs.

The new section will not chase every technological angle and avoid "baseless speculations," according to Neil McIntosh, editor of WSJ Europe. "We want people to feel they can absolutely trust what appears on the site." The section will have to tread "a very careful line," to provide balanced output while outsourcing blog content. While some content might go behind the paywall, and the news website will continue to follow a "mixed approach."

As part of the digital expansion efforts, publisher Dow Jones has advertised six vacancies for its online and mobile division, including the vacancy for an editor for its new technology section, a news editor and assistant news editor who will work cross-platform and a business development manager.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-29 00:29

Fiji's military regime has given The Fiji Times, which is own by Rupert Murdoch's News Limited, three months to change its ownership or close.

The newspaper reported on its website that, under the Media Industry Development Decree that came into effect today, media outlets must be 90 percent owned by Fijian citizens that reside in the country.

"Any media organization which fails to comply with this requirement shall cease to operate as a media organization," said the head of the attorney general's office, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum, as he announced the measures that also allow the regime to censor articles deemed threats to national security.

In a press conference, the attorney general pointed to the News Limited newspaper as the only media that needs to comply with the ownership requirement, explained The Fiji Times.

However, in an interview with Radio Australia, Sayed-Khaiyum said the measures do not force Murdoch's company to close the newspaper as it has several options to consider.

"One of the major ones, obviously, [is that] they can sell down the foreign content to local owners," he said.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-29 00:04

Le Monde's board voted for new ownership between two candidate groups Monday, and accepted the offer from a trio of left-leaning entrepreneurs, led by Lazard banker Matthieu Pigasse, Reuter reported.

Pigasse, Xavier Niel and Pierre Berge offered €110 million euros ($136 million) to help the publication stop losses and repay debts.

Photo: Philippe Wojazer/Reuters

The losing group was personally backed by President Nicolas Sarkozy, who had told Le Monde's Chief Executive Officer Eric Fottorino that he didn't want the paper taken over by the trio, according to the Business Week.

Earlier today, about 90 percent of the paper's journalists, angry about Sarkozy's intervention, voted against that bid, Christian Science Monitor reported.

Le Monde will talk with the new owners in the next three months. According to the newspaper, the bidders have already promised an initial €10 million loan by July 5, Reuters reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-28 23:02

The fight against city councils' production of free newspapers in Britain has made it into the country's government, with Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Eric Pickles announcing he wants to ban councils from producing the papers, saying they represent a threat to the local and regional press.

"Councils should be spending less time and money on weekly town hall Pravdas that end up in the bin and focus more on frontline services such as providing regular rubbish collections," Pickles wrote in an article published on Sunday by The Observer.

According to The Daily Telegraph, the Councils spend £400 million each year to inform citizens about their activities and services. While some send mail shots and leaflets, others have started to distribute weekly newspapers, which now include TV listings and sports reviews.

Furthermore, 47 percent of the council-funded publications contain private-sector advertising, revealed a study conducted last year by the Audit Commission, which monitors spending by local authorities.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-28 20:58

Although U.S. newspapers are widely read online, reaching more than a third of Web users, their' overall share of the Internet ad market is being eroded by the endless amount of competition from online-only news outlets. This trend is expect to continue; however, newspapers should move quickly now to maximise their audience reach before the numbers continue to worsen, Nat Ives explained in an article for AdAge today, interpreting the latest data from PricewaterhouseCoopers.

And despite newspapers' huge reach online, their share of digital ad revenue in the United States has dropped from 16.2 percent in 2005, to 11.4 percent in 2009. By 2014, that number is expected to drop to 7.9 percent, according to PwC data. Meanwhile, overall digital advertising in 2014 will be 56.6 percent larger than it was in 2007.

So what can newspapers do to maximise themselves online, even while their share of the online advertising pie continues to shrink? Ives offers some advice:

1. Stand out. As firms like Yahoo add to staffers to their original news and blogs, newspapers are cutting reporters, "thinning the distinction between their products and those of their rivals. Advertisers also seem to see a diminishing difference. The gap between newspapers' high ad rates online and other news sites' prices is apparently shrinking."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-28 19:25

1seg is a mobile terrestrial broadcasting service offering digital audio/video and data in Japan and Brazil. The service was introduced experimentally in 2005 and commercially launched on April 2006 in Japan. In Brazil, it began in late 2007 in a few selected cities. The first mobile phone handsets for 1seg were on the market in autumn 2005 in Japan, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to data from JEITA and NTT DoCoMo, there was only a small number of 1seg-enabled mobile phone handsets in March 2006, but in December 2007, that number reached 20 million in Japan.

According to CIAJ and MMRI, in Japan an average user consumes 1seg 6.1 times per week, with peak use at 11.7 times. A user views mobile TV for about 47 minutes on average per week, while three out of four of those sessions lasting less than 10 minutes each.

The viewing peak time is on weekdays is between 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. Weekend usage is much lower than weekdays.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-26 00:36

Aiming to attract advertisers, the Los Angeles Times has rolled out a free consumer loyalty programme last week called "SCORE," which offers advertisers a platform to engage with The Times' "large and influential audience," according to a press release by the newspaper. The programme comes with sweepstakes offering cash prizes worth US$200,000, amounting to $10,000 per week for 20 weeks.

The Times' SCORE website describes the programme, which stands for SoCal Offers, Rewards & Entertainment, as "the free points program that rewards you for doing stuff you probably do already," MediaBuyerPlanner.com reported yesterday.

"Southern Californians consistently define what we watch, eat, wear, drive and buy and SCORE offers advertisers a dynamic platform to connect with that vital audience," Bill Nagel, executive vice president of business services at the newspaper, stated in the press release. "This initiative also provides consumers with new ways to interact with their news and benefit from everyday activities they already enjoy."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-25 21:52

Spain's national newspapers reduced in May their circulation decline from an average of 90,000 copies per year to 66,000 copies, according to the Spanish monitory agency OJD, prnoticias.com reported Wednesday.

While El Paí­s and Público registered readership growths of 1.78 percent and 16.33 percent, respectively, La Razón continues to be the publication with the greatest circulation decline, as it fell 24.73 percent to 123,632 copies.

The blog 233grados.com reported that La Razón has cut its circulation by almost a quarter since May 2009. This puts the daily in the fourth position of the circulation ranking, only surpassing Publico (94,450 copies).

According to an OJD report, other newspapers that reported readership loses are ABC (2.29 percent), El Mundo (4.31 percent) and La Vanguardia (1 percent).

With May's circulation growth, El Paí­s continues to be the leader with 391,602 copies followed by El Mundo (299,026 copies), ABC (257,107 copies), La Vanguardia (204,868 copies) and El Periodico (133,753 copies).

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-06-25 20:37

Media reform legislation that would give the government a new authority over media outlets is set to be voted on by Hungary's parliament next week, Deutsche Welle reported Wednesday. If signed into law, the legislation would completely change the way the media is governed through creation of a Media Council.

The new council "would operate within a new authority created through the fusion of the national radio and television authority (ORTT) and the telecom authority (NHH), and its head would be appointed by the prime minister. The four other members are to be appointed by a parliamentary committee, through a two-thirds majority vote in the absence of consensus, paving the way for ruling party control of the body," a report by the International Press Institute explains. "Under the new legislation, officials would also have an automatic right of response to reports they do not like."

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is in favour of the legislation. Photo: AFP via Hurriyet

Another section of the legislative package related to print media and the Internet will be voted on in the autumn.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-25 18:55

Twitter co-founder is hoping to make the social networking site more localized, reports CNBC. Twitter now allows for users to opt if they want their location attached to a tweet or not, thus making the service a slowly growing enterprise.

However, Biz Stone, Twitter co-founder, believes that localized tweets could be beneficial to the company's followers. The Twitter blog explains "if you're like everyone at the Twitter office, you're going crazy about the world cup. When turning to Twitter to keep up with the current game, it helps to know where a Tweet is coming from--is that person watching the game on TV or is he actually in the stadium?"

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-25 17:49

Crowd-sourcing isn't just for editorial anymore.

The Financial Times is opting to use crowd-sourcing in search of marketing ideas to help boost subscriptions on its website, MarketingWeek.co.uk reported today. The FT has posted a brief on the South Africa-based Idea Bounty platform, which allows sourcing and solicitation of marketing and advertising areas.

The site has attracted more than 11,500 registered participants since its launch in November 2008.

The platform has been used by First National Bank, Levi's and BMW to find marketing ideas from a diverse group of members in more than 20 different countries, and recently Unilever joined the brand wagon to source ideas for Peperami, at the expense of long-time ad agency, Lowe.

The FT recently moved its 'Money Supply' blog behind a paywall to increase subscription on its news site. However, it's not sure how this move might affect the newspaper's relationship with its agencies. The winner will be rewarded with a prize of $5,000.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-24 23:50

All five national newspaper sites in the UK had a month-to-month traffic rise in May, mostly due to the election coverage, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, Media Guardian reported.

The overall traffic hit a record high at 131.8 million, paidContent reported.

Graphic: ABCe

The most visited site went to Mail Online, up 1 percent compared to the previous month, to 2.39 million average daily browsers and 42.37 million monthly browsers. It was on the top for the fifth month, according to ABC.

The Daily Mail & General Trust's Web sites increased 9.4 percent month-on-month to 2.01 million average daily browsers, while Telegraph.co.uk came next with about 1.6 million average daily browsers, up 4 percent compared to the figures in April, Press Gazette reported.

Mirror Group Digital gained most month-on-month, up nearly 14 percent to exceed 502,000 average daily browsers, Media Guardian reported.

Independent.co.uk was up 9 percent to 481,954 average daily browsers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-06-24 23:41

Former newspaper baron Conrad Black may be a free man before his six and a half year sentence at Florida's Coleman prison is up, thanks to a ruling in the U.S. Supreme Court today.

In a dramatic decision, the court narrowed the scope of a federal fraud law that states a crime is committed when one "deprive[s] another of the intangible right of honest services," because it is too broad in its scope and too vague to constitute a crime unless a bribe or kickback is involved, the Chicago Tribune reported. Black was convicted in 2007 of one count of obstruction of justice and three counts of fraud, and along with former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling, had appealed his conviction to the Supreme Court. The non-fraud convictions on both men still stand.

Image via Reuters, Black faces the press in Chicago in 2007.
Black once was head of the Hollinger International media company, controlling ome of the most influential newspapers in the world. He had a fortune estimated at £136 million, and owned more than 200 newspapers at the height of his career, including the Jerusalem Post, the Chicago Sun-Times and the Telegraph titles in Britain.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-24 19:15

Apple has recently announced an impressive feat for its new tablet: 3 million iPads have been sold since the device went on sale in the U.S. a mere 80 days ago. Moreover, software developers have created more than 11,000 apps for the device.

"The iPad has emerged as the first tablet computer with mainstream appeal, carving out new product category between smartphones and notebook computers," writes Adam Satariano. And consumers are not the only ones fawning over the iPad: Rupert Murdoch also recently declared his love for the device. "This is a fantastic invention," he said. "It combines the ability to present all forms of media to all people, from 3 year old children to 100 year old men."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-24 18:36


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