Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


April 2010

Pearson, the owner of the Financial Times, announced its Q1 revenues are up 7 percent to £1.08 billion on "volatile" but growing ad revenue at its newspaper business, Media Guardian reported.

The newspaper division, FT Publishing, has seen strong growth in print and online subscriptions and its "return to growth in advertising revenues contribute[d] to a good first quarter."

All parts of the company had a good start this year, with trading met with expectations, as well as the forecast of underlying profit growth this year. "We are encouraged by a more positive environment for corporate and financial advertising, but booking remain volatile and visibility remains poor," according to the company, Media Guardian reported.

"The first quarter never tells us a great deal about the full-year, but our direction of travel is encouraging. We've seen some improvement in markets that were tough for us through the recession, but we remain cautious about the economic outlook," said Marjorie Scardino, chief executive of Pearson.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-30 23:46

The Washington Post Company owned-Newsweek.com is joining the increasing number of news publishers experimenting with cloud computing. The weekly magazine is outsourcing its Web site hosting duties to Amazon, MediaWeek reported.

Having incurred US$29.3 million operating losses in 2009, the move of shifting its hosting operations to an external host is aimed at cutting loses in its magazine division, thereby hoping to save approximately $500,000 annually.
"It saves Newsweek money," Geoff Reiss, vice-president and general manager of Newsweek Digital, told MediaWeek. "Lots of people out there built their own infrastructure and are going to be tortured by this idea of sunk costs."

Newsweek.com also underwent a redesign this week, moving to a more simple, stripped-down look, while avoiding standard media site design features like large ad units and branding statements.

"A clean, vertical orientation on the page was one of the goals. What we've seen come out of social media and blogs [is] an organization that makes sense for how people are consuming media now...brand doesn't trump user experience," Reiss told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 21:33

The Associated Press announced Thursday that it suffered serious losses in revenue and profit in 2009, but it also underscored the fact that it won't take the declines lying down. During its annual meeting the news agency announced the expansion of its AP Gateway initiative through the launch of their News Registry and a niche Web site for college football fans.

The bleak financial records included a nearly 10 percent drop in revenue, now down to US$676.1 million, and a 65 percent fall in net income, bringing it to $8.8 million. Much of this was the result of offering lower rates to its member newspapers, who were also suffering from reduced revenue as a result of the media crisis.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-30 19:58

Aiming to make the Huffington Post more interactive and more social network friendly, the news site yesterday introduced "HuffPo Badges" to encourage interaction among readers, mediabistro.com reported today.

So what do the badges do?

Mediabistro's Alex Alvarez explains: "Basically, they function like a cross between Gawker's tiered, 'starred commenter' system and Foursquare badges. HuffPost badges are awarded based on user activity and interactivity, so, for example, those who regularly comment on the site or share stories across social networks like Twitter can receive a 'Superuser' badge. Readers who go through flagging inappropriate comments to feel some modicum of power as they sit in their sad little cubicles all day can earn 'Moderator' badges."
The Huffington Post quietly rolled out the badge system yesterday, and plans to add more badges in the future, according to an announcement on the site.

The move to use badges and try to engage users more through social networking "has helped make us a more dynamic and interesting site, while keeping the conversation more civil. HuffPost Badges highlights and rewards the people who power our growing community," said Arianna Huffington, according to mediabistro.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 00:09

Vivendi SA is seeking to purchase Lagardere SCA's 20-percent stake in pay-TV operator Canal Plus France, though at a discount, Chief Executive Officer Jean- Bernard Levy said in an interview with Le Figaro, Bloomberg reported.

The newspaper said Vivendi's objective is to fully own its French units "if at a reasonable price." However, "It's not a priority," according to Levy, "the company is also tempted to acquire Vodafone Group PLC's 44-percent holding in operator SFR," according to Le Figaro.

The Paris-based media conglomerate will get a first installment of $2 billion in September for its 20-percent stake sale of NBCU. According to Levy, the company hops to increase its presence in the southern hemisphere, Bloomberg reported.

"We're concerned that the big global investment funds aren't currently interested in a European technology, media and telecoms sector that's taking a pounding from regulators," Le Figaro cited Levy.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-29 23:57

Metro Brazil is rolling out a new edition in Campinas, a city with about two million people, Newspaper Innovation reported today.

The country's fourth edition will have an initial print run of 30,000 copies. Brazil's total Metro circulation is now 240,000 daily copies, with editions also serving São Paulo, Santos and the ABC region, according to a press release from the Stockholm-based publisher, Metro International SA.

The new Campinas edition will be hand-delivered on weekdays by distributors.

"Brazil is one of the most attractive markets in Latin America, both in terms of its size and growth," Metro's CEO Per Mikael Jensen stated in the release.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-29 23:29

The Social Media Club France recently blogged about how the diversification of mobile devices which give readers access to the internet has obviously changed the way users access information. As a result, Social Media Club France recommends that journalists adopt a method of presenting news that is not only interactive but also adaptable to the non-linear diffusion of media.

Prior to the proliferation of smart phones and tablet PCs news was released in a fairly straightforward manner starting either with print or online and slowly working it's way outward. As previously mentioned, though this has changed journalists have not effectively adapted their methods of distribution to capitalize on the way users are consuming data.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-29 21:22

The total daily minutes spent on Facebook reached more than three billion in February 2009, up from 1.1 billion from one year ago, according to data provided by the social networking site. About 15 million users update their statuses on a daily basis, almost quadruple the number one year ago, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Also in February 2009, more than 3.5 million users became "fans" of something each day, more than 850 million photos were posted that month and more than 24 million pieces of content were shared.

comScore found that on average, a Facebook user spent 169 minutes on the site in a month, versus 13 minutes on Google News, or 10 minutes on The New York Times Web site.

In February 2009, time spent on Facebook in Europe accounted for 4.1 percent of the total online minutes, or more than 30 percent of total social networking minutes, up from 1.1 percent and 12.3 percent one year ago, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-29 00:21

The Tribune Company-owned Los Angeles Times will soon begin adding e-commerce links to selected stories and blog posts, as "both a reader service and a revenue opportunity for the company," editor Russ Stanton told staffers in a memo yesterday, LAObserved reported.

The e-commerce links will be highlighted in green with a double underline and no blue editorial link will be replaced with an e-commerce link. Each article or a post that includes an e-commerce green link will have a disclaimer at its foot stating: "Clicking on Green Links will take you to a third-party e-commerce site. These sites are not operated by the Los Angeles Times. The Times Editorial staff is not involved in any way with Green Links or with these third-party sites," Stanton stated in the memo, posted on LAObserved. "These post-publication links to sites such as Amazon and TicketNetwork will serve as both a reader service and a revenue opportunity for the company."
The ads will be placed by an e-commerce producer based at the Chicago Tribune, also owned by the Tribune Co., where the project has been in its testing phase for about six months. The e-commerce links will appear on health, image, food, travel, books, entertainment, sports sections and photo galleries. The green links will not appear in columns, news section articles and blogs, according to the memo on LAObserved.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-28 22:14

U.S. media company E.W. Scripps is selling its United Media Licensing business, and with it the rights to Peanuts cartoons, including characters Snoopy and Charlie Brown, to branding company Iconix for US$175 million, NPR reported yesterday.

Iconix now owns 80 percent of the licensing rights, while the heirs of Charles Schulz, who wrote Peanuts and died in 2000, are partnering with Iconix and will have a 20 percent stake. UM-licensed products bring in about $2 billion in retail sales yearly, most of which comes from products associated with Peanuts. About two-thirds of sales come from outside the United States.

Peanuts is expected to generate about $75 million in annual royalty revenue, Iconix stated in a press release.

"Iconix will also acquire the licensing and character representation business of United Media Licensing, a division of UFS, which, in addition to Peanuts, represents a number of character brands, including Dilbert and Fancy Nancy. The Peanuts brand and other acquired assets will be purchased through a newly formed subsidiary," consisting of the Schulz family and Iconix, the company stated.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-28 21:37

Popular tech blog Gizmodo's leak of the new iPhone prototype has garnered the attention of more than just interested Apple fanatics. Last Friday, Gizmodo editor Jason Chen arrived home around 9:45 to find police in his home, removing 4 computers and 2 servers with a search warrant signed by the judge of the Superior Court of San Mateo as their defense. In response, Gawker Chief Operating Officer and legal counsel Gaby Derbyshire claims this search was illegal under a California shield law created especially to protect journalists, and that the police must return Chen's belongings.

What has since erupted across the web and likely in legal courts soon is a debate over the legality of Gizmodo's iPhone scoop, the application of the untested shield law, and, most fundamentally, whether bloggers are considered journalists in the eyes of the law.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-28 21:05

Advertising on quality, original content sites is more effective than ads elsewhere on the Web, a new report released today by the Online Publishers Association has found.

According to the report, "Improving Ad Performance Online," ads on OPA sites were consistently more effective than portals, ad networks and the Web in terms of raising awareness, creating message association, generating brand favourability and driving purchase intent.

"Ad network performance has declined to a point where they provide no significant increase in purchase intent to advertisers. As a result of this insignificance, the average brand campaign may not achieve greater brand lift by advertising on an ad network," Pam Horan, president of the OPA, stated in a press release.

Using data from independent marketing database Dynamic Logic's MarketNorms, the study concluded that ad networks "provide advertisers with the smallest change across ad effectiveness metrics."

Minonline pointed out that the study continues to "jab at the large aggregators of remnant and small site inventory," after "a fight with ad networks that the OPA started last year with similar research findings."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-28 00:24

The Sun plans to launch a special 3D edition on June 5, in order to commemorate the World Cup games, Huliq reported.

The special issue of the UK tabloid daily will print its editorial, ads and a World Cup Fixtures Wall Chart in 3D. Readers will receive 3D glasses.

This title, owned by News International, will be the first one to run ads and editorial in this format in the UK, Media Week reported.

It is understood that advertisers will have to pay a significant premium if they want colour ads in 3D.

Besides a print campaign, a TV campaign is expected to run in May to bolster the 3D edition.

Advertisers will need to pay premium for a 3D ad, Media Week reported. .

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-27 21:49

South Africa's Cape Times plans to redesign and relaunch just before the World Cup takes place in June, GrubStreet.co.za reported.

"We're hoping to achieve a livelier product, taking into account media trends around the world and more partnership with online," Chris Whitfield, editor-in-chief of the Cape Times, told GrubStreet.

"We're looking at the way we write and the beats we cover and having more people in stories. The Cape Times can be fairly dry and we'd like a little bit more humour and levity," he said.

The Cape Times has a strong focus on politics and business, and Whitfield said he thinks a broader appeal with some marketing can beef up the editorial relaunch "aimed at producing a compelling newspaper."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-27 20:51

A Boston area publication, The Telegram & Gazette, recently announced it will begin implementing a "metered model" paywall over the summer. Jacqueline Reis from the Telegram and Gazette staff announced on the Web site that the new model will not charge print subscribers for access to online content.

The new model will still give readers free access to the majority of content offered on the site, with the exception of the content produced by the Telegram and Gazette's staff. The newspaper's publisher, Bruce Gaultney described the new method as a way to "recognise the value of local news" that would "bring new revenue to support news operations."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-27 20:18

Facebook's unique visitors worldwide jumped from about 20 million in January 2007, to 101 million one year later, up 305 percent, according to Morgan Stanley Research. The total minutes spent on the site accounted for five billion minutes in January 2007, but surged 363 percent to about 20 billion minutes one year later, which made it number four globally, only behind Yahoo!, Live and YouTube, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to Facebook's statistics in March 2008, there were 250,000 new registrations per day since January 2007. Among the 67 million active users, more than half of them use it on a daily basis.

Also, to the surprise of many, Facebook in not just the privilege of tech-savvy kids - the college and post-college folks (18- to 24-yearolds), which the site originally aimed to target, now only account for less than 25 percent of total users. The fastest-growing demographic group is women age of 55 and older, up 175 percent since September 2008.

Today, more than seven out of 10 Facebook users are outside the United States, and most of them access the site in their native languages.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-27 04:55

Figures released Monday by the Audit Bureau of Circulations show a circulation decline of U.S. newspapers, with average weekday sales falling 8.7 percent in the six month period ending March 31, reports The Associated Press.

However, the rate of decline slowed down from the previous six-month period. From April through September of last year, the average weekday circulation dropped 10.6 percent. Sunday circulation fell 6.5 percent, compared to 7.5 percent last year.

The New York Times notes that this decline affected both large and small newspapers, with the San Francisco Chronicle suffering the most out of the 25 largest circulation newspapers, due to the loss of 22.7 percent of its weekday sales.

Amongst other major newspapers, The Washington Post's average weekday circulation fell 13.1 percent to 578,482 and dropped 8.2 percent to 797,679 on Sundays. USA Today lost 13.6 percent of its circulation and averaged 1.83 million. The New York Times suffered an 8.5 percent decline in weekday circulation, and a 5.2 drop on Sundays. Its average circulation was 951,063 on weekdays and 1.38 million on Sundays.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-27 03:25

Facebook's new Graph API, released last Friday, allows users to see public events people have said they will attend or have attended - even if that person is not a "friend" of the user viewing the information, MediaGuardian reported today. The new API was just one new feature unveiled last week during F8, Facebook's developers conference.

According to Facebook, however, the API simply "attempts to simplify the way developers read and write data to Facebook. It presents a simple, consistent view of the Facebook social graph, uniformly representing objects in the graph (e.g., people, photos, events, and fan pages) and the connections between them (e.g., friend relationships, shared content, and photo tags)... All of the objects in the Facebook social graph are connected to each other via relationships. Bret Taylor is a fan of the Coca-Cola page, and Bret Taylor and Arjun Banker are friends. We call those relationships connections in our API."

Ka-Ping Yee, a software engineer for Google's charitable branch, first discovered that information about people was being made to non-"friends." He also found that this information is released randomly - in some cases you can see public events people say they will attend or have attended, but not all.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-26 22:36

UK daily Nottingham Evening Post has dropped "Evening" from its masthead and is now called the Nottingham Post, as it has been published overnight since last year, Holdthefrontpage.co.uk reported. The title change is accompanied by a redesign and typographical changes as well.

Also in its masthead, the Northcliffe newspaper has changed "Nottingham City of Legends" to "The City of Legends," printed below the the newspaper's name in the masthead. So far, the redesign "has been well received by readers," editor Malcolm Pheby told HoldtheFrontPage.

Other than using a slightly bigger fit, the print edition has more emphasis on photographs, as well as more letters, guest writers, a new daily picture section on births, weddings, celebrations and events, and a separate section for obituaries.

These changes are aimed at making the paper "fresher and easier to read," MediaGuardian reported. "Nottingham is a very metropolitan and cosmopolitan city and we felt that the newspaper didn't match the complexity of the city," said Pheby, according to MediaGuardian's Roy Greenslade.

However, Greenslade remarked he believes crime news reported by the newspaper is hyped, which goes against the idea of accurately reporting the city's complexity, as Pheby said.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-26 21:48

As the Wall Street Journal plans to launch its new 10-page metro edition today, with the admitted purpose of competing directly with The New York Times, analysts everywhere are asking why.

The Journal's metro launch will cost it US$30 million over the next two years, and the paper is not particularly prized by locals for its New York city coverage. But this move comes as an obvious extension of what has been an ongoing battle against The Times since Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. bought Dow Jones, the WSJ's parent company, in 2007.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Photo: Huffington Post

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-26 20:47

The iPad currently makes up 26 percent of Wired.com's traffic from mobile devices, the technology site reported less than three weeks after the device's launch.

Although mobile accounts for just between 2.3 percent and 3.5 percent of overall traffic, the high number of iPad users suggests most are those who already used the iPhone and iPod Touch, as those users are declining the same amount the iPad user numbers are rising.

Wired UK editor David Cowan said last month the magazine's iPad edition will cost less than the print edition.

Meanwhile, a television station in Albany, Georgia, United States, is replacing its printed paper scripts with iPads, and expect to save about US$9,600 on yearly costs as a result, Poynter Online's Damon Kiesow reported today. Previously, each script was created as a PDF and e-mailed to staffers.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-24 00:08

U.S. newspaper companies drew record traffic to their Web sites in the first quarter - on average 74.4 million monthly unique visitors, which represents more than one-third of all online users, according to the latest figures provided by Nielsen Online for the Newspaper Association of America, Editor and Publisher reported.

The numbers were up from 72 million unique visitors per month during the previous quarter. The data also showed online newspaper visitors contributed more than 3.2 billion page views, or more than 2.3 billion minutes browsing, in the first quarter of 2010, according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

"As the economic outlook begins to improve, our industry will continue to shape its own future with digital products and services that grow audience and offer maximum value to advertisers," according to NAA President and CEO John F. Sturm.

"Newspaper publishers continue to experiment with aggressive new business models, leveraging trustworthy and robust content to attract large audiences to their digital properties month after month," Sturm added in a statement.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-23 23:00

A free, quarterly business magazine called BQ Scotland is set to launch in Scotland on June 11, AllmediaScotland reported. This new full-colour magazine will provide business news, commentary from leading business people and profiles of Scotland's most inspirational entrepreneurs.

Having successfully entered the market with separate BQ editions for Yorkshire and the North-East of England in the last two years, the Tyne and Weir-based Room501 publisher will now aim to reach affluent influential businessmen and women, such as directors, owners, managers, entrepreneurs and opinion formers across Edinburgh, Glasgow and the central belt.

"BQ Scotland wants to get to the heart and soul of Scotland's business people and find out what drives, inspires and motivates them towards their ambitions," Alistair Fleming, project manager of Room501 Publishing told AllmediaScotland. "Each quarter, BQ will bring its readership a wealth of business intelligence and information, whilst looking ahead to forthcoming events and reporting on recent developments that will have a significant impact on the Scottish business landscape."

Hoping for a broader appeal, the magazine will carry regular features on things like commercial property, wine, fashion motoring and business lunches, Fleming said.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-23 22:16

Google's position as a top news site traffic driver has put editors between a rock and a hard place -- should they take the leap to remove their content from Google and risk losing readers? Or should they allow the company to financially benefit from content it did not generate?

Writing for paidContent, media and internet consultant Arnon Mishkin offered news publishers a reality check: "Google is much less important than you think."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-23 22:09


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