Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


October 2009

The Washington Post Co. posted a third quarter profit, no thanks to its newspaper division, Reuters reported today. According to the report, the paper actually was an albatross, with print advertising revenue down by 28 percent.

Conversely, The Associated Press attributed the publisher's gains to deep cuts in the newsroom rather than any great strides in the company's broadcasting and educational divisions, the latter of which lags behind competitors.

The Wall Street Journal took a more balanced view of the earnings report, characterising the strong performance of The Post's non-newspaper businesses as cushioning continuing losses in the strictly publishing divisions.

The hard figures as declared by the company itself were as follows: net income of US$17.1 million ($1.81 per share) for the quarter ending September 27, 2009, compared to net income of US$10.4 million ($1.08 per share) for the same period last year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 17:00

In the style of some museums and restaurants, The Hannibal Courier-Post in February gave up on Mondays altogether, according to The Associated Press. Slicing the slow ad day from "Missouri's oldest daily" may have interrupted its record of continuous publication (since 1838) but, at least, it kept the newspaper as a whole in operation, according to its publisher Jack Whitaker.

The Courier-Post is not the only U.S. newspaper experimenting with changes in print delivery in search of continued viability as a going concern. Just yesterday, Superior Publishing Corp. announced it would also suspend one print day per week at its three Minnesota newspapers.

"These changes are part of overall strategy to enhance the newspapers' multi-media presence and leverage the value of the Internet while maintaining full news coverage for the community," President Charles Johnson was quoted by Business North as saying.

The suspension at Superior - effective next week - follows last month's switch to online access fees for nonsubscribers of the print edition.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 17:00

The Wall Street Journal yesterday advised the nine employees staffing its Boston office that, henceforth, the former heart of the financial newspaper's mutual fund coverage would be absorbed by its New York bureau, Mutual Fund Wire reported yesterday.

By way of explanation, Managing Editor Robert Thomson said the newspaper remains "in the midst of a profound downturn in advertising revenue," The Associated Press yesterday reported.

News Corp., which owns the Journal, did not announce plans to close the Boston offices of Dow Jones Newswires and MarketWatch, Reuters reported yesterday.

Plans to close the Journal's Boston bureau followed Tuesday's announcement that the Journal would stop selling a London edition and focus instead on launching a redesigned product for all of Europe in mid-November, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 17:00

Canadian journalists took to the streets yesterday, clamoring for discretion in their collective bargaining process with La Presse, North America's largest French-language publication, Radio-Canada reported yesterday. The staffers say that as long as publishers leverage thinly-veiled threats of job loss reported in their pages to wage their labour-and-employment battle, workers will be forced to air publicly their side of the struggle, too.

"You feel the pressure, you feel your jobs are threatened, so, inevitably, you're weaker and the feeling is very palpable in the people and this fear becomes an asset to the employer," Karim Benessaieh was quoted by Radio-Canada as saying in French.

Overall, though, they would prefer to negotiate behind closed doors, according to Radio-Canada's report. The Information Workers of La Presse Syndicate (STIP by its acronym in French) complained in September of past edicts to the union published by management in its editorial pages, as Yahoo! News Quebec then reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 16:58

NBC's New York Telemundo station, WNJU, announced today it will restructure in order to better produce news for multiple platforms, MediaWeek reported. In doing so, the station has created a new position, vice president of content.

Better measuring online readership, meanwhile, is another important next step in a multi-platform world, the Guardian pointed out yesterday. "In a fragmented media world, the paper is just one way among many to publish a story," the article stated, using The New York Times as an example.

The New York Times saw a 7 percent decline in paid circulation between April and September, according to Nielsen figures, out Monday. However, its Web site, NYTimes.com, had 21 million unique users in the United States, while its mobile site had 40 million pageviews in September and more than two million readers downloaded the paper's iPhone app since it launched in July of last year.

Overall, U.S. newspaper readership dropped 10.6 percent on weekdays and 7.5 percent on Sundays in the six months ending Sept. 30, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, The New York Times reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 16:09

Metropolitan readership throughout New Zealand showed notable gains in the year ending September 30, even as the national average rose by less than 1 percent over the course of the same period, Scoop Business reported yesterday.

According to Nielsen Media Research which conducted the readership survey, the island nation has more than 150 metropolitan and community newspapers serving a population of 4.1 million. Annual advertising dollars for all media approach NZ$2.2 billion (US$1.6 billion)

Nielsen's figures conflict with data gathered by the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the industry authority on readership and circulation.

According to ABC, only The Auckland Independent was read by more people this year than last, with 57 more copies in circulation in the period from January to June as compared with the same timeframe in 2008. All other newspapers - metropolitan or community - showed modest, yet consistent, declines.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-30 14:35

Ten employees at Scottish newspaper the West Highland Free Press have taken over control from five shareholders who owned it, and the paper will henceforth be managed by a staff-centred trust, the BBC reported today.

The move toward employee ownership "marks a defining moment in UK newspaper ownership. At a time when the wider industry is in difficulty, I hope this sends out a clear message that there is a future for newspapers that provide quality and informed content of interest to its readership," said Paul Wood, director of the paper, according to Holdthefrontpage.co.uk.

"The move to employee ownership sits easily with what I feel the paper stands for and leaves a legacy in our hands for the community and to all future employees of the company for generations to come," he said.

The West Highland Free Press, now the only employee-owned UK newspaper, was launched in 1972 by the original five shareholders, and the ownership transfer comes at the end of more than a year of negotiations between the shareholders, staff and funders, Holdthefrontpage.co.uk reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-29 18:31

After being closed down for 23 years, the St. Louis Globe-Democrat is being relaunched, but this time, online-only, the paper's publisher, Dan Rositano, announced today, The Associated Press reported. The newspaper's Web site will officially launch by beginning coverage Dec. 8, and will be free to users who register with their e-mail addresses.

The Globe-Democrat was founded in 1852, and today announced it will "be the number one digital source for breaking news and develop the reputation for being the first with the big stories. We will provide you with the opportunity to contribute and add personality to our coverage utilizing the latest technologies to deliver your news the way you want it."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-29 17:22

The fragile rally enjoyed by U.S. media groups over the course of the summer may have come to an end, Editor & Publisher reported yesterday.

Shares of all newspaper companies traded on the New York Stock Exchange closed down on the session - most by double-digit percentages - following the Audit Bureau of Circulations first-ever double-digit percentage decline in overall newspaper circulation.

Some media business analysts, however, called for putting the figures in perspective. Slate pointed out that due to aggressive price hikes at several newspaper groups - including Gannett and The New York Times - circulation revenues actually rose, however modestly, even as the rest of the market remained in a state of near freefall.

USA Today reported this morning that Wall Street as a whole may be headed for a sluggish "u-shaped" recovery rather than a quick "v-shaped" snap back into economic health. The S&P 500-stock index sank 2 percent to 1042.63 yesterday, extending its recent pullback to 5 percent. Meanwhile, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down 99 points, or 1 percent, at 9783, dipping below 9800 for the first time since Oct. 9, according to yesterday's Wall Street Journal.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-29 16:11

President and editor Guy Crevier announced today that half of La Presse's eight unions have agreed in principle to changes that would stave a promised closure of North America's largest French-language broadsheet on December 1, The Canadian Press reported yesterday.

The agreement follows Crevier's October 22 plea to employees, republished by Rue Frontenac, to reconsider their bargaining position in the face of the newspaper's financial disclosures made on October 16.

Apparently, the agreement was preceded also by an open editorial titled "Reasonable and responsible offers," in which Crevier underscored the economic context impacting Canadian media, notably facing a drop in advertising revenue, according to Infopresse.

In July, La Presse stopped publishing a Sunday edition as a cost-cutting measure, as La Presse then reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-29 15:29

The few newspapers flourishing despite the general current decline in circulation appear to have one thing in common: they give readers what they want, but can't get anywhere else. It is this philosophy that drives today's launch of Appleton Journal, a print weekly aimed at delivering local news typically snubbed by other media, according to WLUK-TV.

"We're basically a scrapbook for moms and dads and grandmas and grandpas, that's all we are," said Times-Villager Newspaper Group General Manager Bart Landsverk. The Appleton Journal is the media group's fourth paid weekly serving Wisconsin's Fox Valley, in the United States.

The same holds true for the Shaw Newspaper Group, the third-oldest continually-owned family media enterprise in the United States, according to the Public Broadcasting System. "Our franchise is local information," President and CEO Thomas Shaw was quoted as saying on Nightly Business Report. "Everything else in the electronic age is world news, national news, even regional news has become a commodity and people can get it just about anywhere. But people cannot get the information we provide our community anywhere but from us."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 19:39

Telecom market revenues in most countries were on the rise from 2004 to 2007, according to data from Ofcom.

In Europe, Germany leads with the highest telecom market revenues among the four countries surveyed. However, its revenues dropped a little from £31.5 billion in 2004 to £30.4 billion in 2007, as both fixed line and mobile were down, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

The United Kingdom was second, with telecom market revenues up from £23.8 billion in 2004 to £26.9 billion in 2007.

France and Italy also marked increases in revenue, from £21.7 billion and £19.3 billion in 2004 to £24.3 billion and £20.5 billion in 2007, respectively.

In North America, U.S. telecom market revenues grew from £116.3 billion to £133 billion, while in Canada the market rose from £11.9 billion to £14.2 billion, according to Ofcom.

In Japan, one of the world's most pioneering telecom markets, revenues were up a little from £49.5 billion in 2004 to £50.4 billion in 2007, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-28 18:43

An island newspaper went into receivership yesterday for failure to pay out a tort award of $191,000 (US$71,135), Caribarena reported today. Grenada Today, owned and operated by George Worme, had been ordered Thursday on appeal to establish a pay schedule with former prime minister Keith Mitchell by Tuesday or face liquidiation of its assets, according to The Gleaner.

The crippling libel award stems from a 2001 letter to the editor calling Mitchell corrupt and incompetent, The Associated Press reported yesterday. Despite the reader's published remark, Mitchell held his seat in public office from 1995 through 2008, according to CNW Telbec.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 18:38

Gannett Co., Inc.'s (NYSE: GCI) Board of Directors today announced that a dividend of
4 cents per share would be paid on January 4, 2010 to shareholders of record as of
the close of business on December 11, 2009, Reuters reported today.

Gannett reported consolidated 3Q revenues of US$1.34 billion, down 18 percent from a year ago but exceeding the company's forecast of $1.32 billion, TVB reported today. Net income was $73.8 million versus $158.1 million for 3Q08. The company declared 4 cent dividends in April and July as well. Gannett publishes 84 U.S. dailies, including USA Today, according to Business Wire.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 17:35

As the advertising market in Australia begins to recover, so-called old media is also recovering, and doing relatively well, especially compared to those in the United States, The Australian reported Monday.

In the year to September 30, local newspapers in the country saw a small increase on ad revenue spending compared to January 2007, and radio also grew.

In the United States, the bottoming out of the auto industry and the hardships in banking and retail led MarketWatch to ask, "What advertising industry comeback?" The article noted that Interpublic, the world's largest advertising and marketing conglomerate, saw a 47 percent drop in profit in the third quarter.

The Associated Press reported Interpublic earned $17.2 million in the three months ending September 30, compared to $38.7 million in the same period last year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 16:04

A major U.S. publisher has signed a five-year deal to update its technological infrastructure with a top name in information technology, according to PR Newswire.

The deal expands a pre-existing alliance through which Belo outsourced help desk and similar back-end functions to IBM about which Broadcast Engineering reported in 2006. Belo Corp. publishes daily print editions of The Dallas Morning News, The Providence Journal, The Press-Enterprise (Riverside, California) and the Denton Record-Chronicle (Denton, Texas).

The company also publishes specialty publications targeting young adults and the fast-growing Hispanic market, including Quick and Al Dia in Dallas/Fort Worth, and El D and La Prensa in Riverside. Belo also operates 30 websites associated with a variety of media outlets it owns.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-28 15:08

In an ironic twist, a 60-year-old totalitarian government known for its virtually absolute control on its population's external communications has accused the world's most widely used free Internet search engine of curtailing freedom of information, The Associated Press reported today.

China, which tied for second to last place in Freedom House's 2009 index of Internet liberty, complained that from Wednesday through Friday attempts to link to People's Daily when listed among Google search results returned a warning that proceeding to the government-run publication could harm the user's computer because it contained corrupted software, Trading Markets reported today.

"After double checking, there is no malicious software detected on our Web site, and until now Google has not given us any explanation on this matter," Pan Jiang, the director of the books channel of People.com.cn, the official Web site of People's Daily, told the Global Times Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-27 16:28

The road which lies ahead for the Bhutan Times just got tougher.

Three weeks ago, the country's only publicly-traded publisher changed hands as it faced a loss of Nu 5.39 million (US$115,790) South Asia Media reported Saturday. Then, along with new chairman and CEO Wancha Sangey, the newspaper secured written pledges from all employees to do their best to help bring the newspaper back from the economic brink. Now, half of those same employees abandoned ship Friday, citing irreconcilable differences over how much editorial control management should reasonably be permitted to exert for the sake of commerce.

Sangey views the dispute as centering instead on issues of defamation and a plot to bankrupt the company. "Since I joined, I made one request to them that, while freedom of speech is very important, we shouldn't forget that we're Bhutanese and that you can slur a ministry if it's wrong but not Bhutan as a nation."

Seven former journalists signed a rebuttal to Sangey's charges in a letter to the editor published by Bhutan Today. Concurrently, Bhutan Today's managing director, Tenzin Dorji, denounced the resignations as immoral, adding that he had no intention of hiring them to his sole proprietor publication.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-27 15:05

The McClatchy Company today announced plans to expand a coupons-only programme it has yet to launch in actual practice.

The programme, called Sunday Select, which is slated to start November 15, entails directly mailing printed promotional materials to households in postal codes advertisers want to reach. The materials are virtually identical to those a newspaper subscriber would receive but are wrapped in an editorial broadsheet as opposed to the publisher's entire publication. Sunday Select differs from "junk mail" in that prospective recipients must sign up for the package of circulars or "opt in" in order to receive them.

McClatchy's inaugural markets are Sacramento, California; Kansas City, Missouri; Tacoma, Washington; and Columbia, South Carolina. The markets to be added on February 28, 2010 are Modesto, California; Forth Worth, Texas; Wichita, Kansas; Lexington, Kentucky; and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, the Sacramento Business Journal reported today.

According to Editor & Publisher, the Sunday Select programme was developed by Gannett. It also will be adopted by Tribune and MediaGroup over the course of the next six months.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-27 13:42

The U.S. Justice Department has dropped its investigation into a newspaper merger slated for publications throughout Northwest Arkansas, the Fayeteville Flyer reported today.

The conclusion of the antitrust allegation signals that Wehco Media and Stephens Media LLC will join as scheduled on November 1, according to The Morning News. Whole Hog Sports reported today that the go-ahead came in the absence of an outside buyer for Stephens' flagship publication, The Morning News.

The 50-50 partnership will publish the Democrat-Gazette; The Morning News; the Northwest Arkansas Times; the Benton County Daily Record; weekly newspapers in several counties; and a sports magazine, Hawgs Illustrated, the Democract-Gazette reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-27 13:20

U.S. online advertising spending will rise to US$42 billion in 2013, up from $23.6 billion in 2008, according to November 2008 eMarketer data.

Search owns the biggest share, with 45.3 percent in 2008, and is expected to remain in the leading position, with 46.5 percent in 2013, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.Display ads accounted for nearly 20 percent in 2008, and are forecast to drop slightly to 19 percent in 2013. The classifieds sector, however, made up 13.3 percent in 2008, and is expected to see a drop in share to 7 percent in 2013, according to eMarketer.

Video ads are the biggest winner, expecting to account for 11 percent in 2013, up from just 2.5 percent in 2008.

Lead generation, sponsorship and e-mail are also likely to see a decline in share, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-10-27 12:19

The Audit Bureau of Circulations today announced that circulation of U.S. newspapers from April through September declined 10 percent from the figures reported for the same six-month period last year, the Toronto Sun reported today.

Reuters today attributed the plunge to an increasing number of subscribers cancelling home delivery of a newspaper along with a reduction in the publishers' once common practice of issuing free or discounted copies in bulk. Bloomberg blamed, in part, rising prices of subscription for at-home delivery service.
This steep drop follows a 7.1 decline from October 2008 through March 2009 and a 4.6 dip in the six-month period prior, according to The Associated Press.

The Chicago Tribune today listed the top 25 papers and their respective changes in circulation. The top five were as follows:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-26 18:41

Market watchers say the newspaper industry is faring better than predicted, at least in the land down under, perth now reported today.

Royal Bank of Scotland's analyst Fraser McLeish put "buy" recommendations on Fairfax Media and APN News & Media, The Australian reported today.

The upgrade comes as U.S. newspapers such as The New York Times reported a freefall in advertising revenues for the most recent quarter, according to the Jacksonville Business Journal. Meanwhile, Fairfax Media shares reached a high of A$1.80 in October, up from $0.80 in March, while News Corporation shares rose from $8.93 to $16 during the period, Trading Markets reported today. McLeish attributed his upgrade of newspaper stock to the rebound in online classified ads he expects as the job market recovers, Brisbane Times reported Tuesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-26 15:59

Mercedes-Benz USA's digital media specialist Beth Lange said the company will shift away from online newspaper ads to "more targeted and efficient" media buys next year to announce its basic models, The New York Times reported Sunday.

The same article called newspaper sites the patent-leather stilettos of the online ad world: reserved for special occasions while networks and exchanges like Advertising.com from AOL and DoubleClick Ad Exchange from Google do the daily duty of a work shoe.

Compared to more saturating bundled media buys, print newspapers alone yield a reduced rate of return on investment, the story stated. In Gujarat at least, the slide in advertising has led to greater efficiency in the development and placement of ads, relying most on what is known as ambient marketing, or ads in unlikely places, India Express today reported.

For example, The McClatchy Company, where online ad revenue rose 3.1 percent over last year, proved the exception among U.S. online newspaper publishers, although its ad revenue growth indeed slowed for the period.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-26 14:50


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