Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


July 2009

Unpaid contributors, when used too much, can have a negative effect on quality, Gawker reported yesterday, citing the Huffington Post as an example.

Ariana Huffington doesn't pay most of her contributing writers; therefore, those writing for the popular online publication "must make the work pay elsewhere, and this is where HuffPo gets itself into trouble," Gawker's Ryan Tate writes.

In one example, Tate cites the recent claim of a HuffPo columnist who wrote about colon cleansing as a possible treatment for swine flu. The author of the article, Kim Evans, used the article and the site for self-promotion of her book, Cleaning Up! The Ultimate Body Cleanse.

Tate also cites William Thompson Jr., New York City's comptroller and mayoral candidate, also resident Huffington Post contributor, as another example. According to The New Republic, a recent piece by Thompson is used as a personal platform for Thompson to bash Schools Chancellor Joel Klein, while also leaving out the fact that Thompson is running for mayor (the current mayor, Michael Bloomberg, appointed Klein).

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 17:52

The Philippine newspaper industry is healthy and growing, as a recent study by market research firm Synovate revealed a continued readership growth in the upscale market, BusinessWorld online reported Friday.

Synovate's global executive director, Steve Garton, announced yesterday that readership in A and B classes was up 64 percent from March to May. This comes on top of a 59 percent increase from November 2008 to January of this year.

"It's time to debunk the myth that newspapers are dying (here). They are not," he said.

The overall readership increase was slightly reduced with 34 percent growth for the most recent period next to 37 percent growth for the proceeding three month analysis. This drop was due to declines in the D and E segments, where lesser purchasing power exists compared with the more affluent categories.

"This is a good thing. In today's economy, advertisers are looking for efficient targeting of people. Print has an advantage because it is increasingly a target of the upper-socio," Garton said.

However, the Philippine print industry has shared similar advertising woes as its international counterparts. A Nielsen Media Research study revealed that print publications capture just 5 percent of an estimated P40.7 billion spent on advertising in the first quarter.

Synovate also discovered a 24 percent increase in office readership numbers, up from an 11 percent growth in the period before.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 17:03

Zimbabwe's governmental coalition on Thursday granted an operating license to a national newspaper group forced into closure by the state five years ago. The Associated Newspapers of Zimbabwe were given the right to resume publication after nearly two years of investigation by a special committee of the Information Ministry, Reuters reported Thursday.

The "unity government," formed by President Robert Mugabe and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, has been under pressure to relinquish media and political restraints in order to secure foreign aid as the Zimbabwe economy degenerates into further chaos.

The government has introduced the Zimbabwe Media Commission as the primary instrument of the reforms, which include easing restrictive registration and accreditation requirements for media, according to Reuters.

As of Thursday the ANZ had not commented on the lifting of the publication ban. The ANZ had formerly published a private daily newspaper and a weekly Sunday, both critical of Mugabe's regime and the coverage provided by the government-controlled newspapers.

In 2002 Mugabe implemented strict media laws making it dfficult and dangerous for private and foreign media in Zimbabwe.

British broadcaster, the BBC, has secured a similar lift on publishing restrictions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 16:35

A bankruptcy court judge has accepted the Minneapolis Star Tribune's reorganisation plan, which could enable the paper to be independent of chapter 11 bankruptcy protection within the next few months, the Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal reported.

The plan remains to be approved by creditors who will vote on whether or not to accept the proposed reorganisation that would give more than 95 percent of the company's stake to an investment group.

The newspaper is also expected to install a new board of directors and name a new publisher by the end of August.

The project should allow the paper to leave behind chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, taking a $100 million in debt with it.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 16:19

The Bay State Banner, Boston's only African American-owned newspaper, will resume printing after almost a month's hiatus due to large decreases in advertising revenue, the Boston Herald reported.

Financial support for the publication has been made possible by a $200,000 loan from the city, which the Banner's publisher Mel Miller accepted from mayor Thomas M. Menino, while pledging to maintain the paper's independence despite the government's aid.
In an announcement on their Web site, the paper projected an August 6 relaunch of the title, made possible by the backing of readers and the community.

"Starting Aug. 6, readers can once again expect the same independent, informative and well-researched journalism that has characterized the Banner for 44 years," the announcement promised, adding that the return to the presses happened in "record time."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 15:18

An announcement yesterday by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel confirmed the acceptance of buyout offers by 29 full-time and five part-time staffers, Editor & Publisher reported.

Though no names have been released, several employees who opted for the buyout offer are suspected to be longtime staff members of the newspaper. Reports include veteran columnists, reporters and critics of the paper in the list of staff that will be leaving the paper.

The deadline to accept the buyout was Monday night, with layoffs to follow if not enough employees accept the deal. The buyouts mark a third attempt by the paper to reduce staff and costs. Greg Pearson of the newsroom employees union has reported that executives for the Journal Sentinel expect to have to cut "substantially more" positions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-31 15:04

Schenectady, New York's Daily Gazette will once again charge for online content that has been offered for free since 2007, The Associated Press reported.

Beginning August 3, the electronic edition of the paper and other online content will be uniquely available to home delivery subscribers or those who pay a US$2.95 monthly subscription fee. Selected blogs and featured breaking news will be posted on a free site.

Judy Patrick, the Gazette's managing editor, said the decision was made due to disappointing online advertising revenue and expressed the paper's intention to keep the integrity of the paper's content as well as reward paying readers by once again charging to use the site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 11:38

A deal struck between Microsoft and Yahoo offers few advantages to newspapers in the Yahoo Newspaper Consortium, Ken Doctor wrote in a piece for iStockAnalyst.

Mike Silver, the Consortium's executive director, told Doctor "we would expect that with Yahoo now focused on display advertising, the response (to newspaper company needs) should be stronger."

"What the deal doesn't include is more traffic generation, a good Yahoo benefit, as it gives preference to newspaper content. No Microsoft preference in this deal," Doctor states.

The deal also does not include the right for consortium papers to use resources such as Yahoo's HotJobs site nor does it expand newspapers' local markets since Microsoft and Yahoo will "go their own ways in selling display advertising," leaving consortium papers out of the loop of Microsoft's local.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 11:18

The Trinity Mirror has reported decreases in operating profit due to declining advertising revenue; however, those ad revenue losses are slowing, The Financial Times reported.

The newspaper publisher's adjusted operating profits fell from £80.5 million to £49.1 million over the course of about six and a half months. Revenue dropped from £460.8 million to £383 million and the Mirror attributes £65.6 million of that fall to lost ad revenue. However, the numbers beat market expectations for the first half of the year.

The decline in ad sales is slowing, and thanks to that plus cost cutting measures, Trinity Mirror saw shares rise by 15 percent, according to Reuters. The UK publishing group said it expects numbers to continue to improve throughout the second half of the year.

In order to offset losses due to declines in the ad market, a series of cutbacks and layoffs have been imposed by the Trinity Mirror, which have been met with resistance by the National Union of Journalists.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 11:02

A local entrepreneur of in the Minnesota town of Willmar has launched a trilingual newspaper publishing in English, Spanish and Somali, the Post-Bulletin reported Wednesday. Marian Sanchez is the founder and president of La Gran America, and was encouraged to start her own paper after working on the now defunct Spanish version of Sauk Centre Herald, called El Heraldo.

The newspaper has opened a small operation with a circulation of 1,000 within the Willmar area, and Sanchez personally delivers the paper to other rural cities including as Alexandria, Spicer and Pelican Rapids.

Sanchez is also the newspaper's primary contributor, supplemented by half a dozen volunteer writers from the relative ethnic communities.

The newspaper's content is around 60 percent Spanish, 30 percent in English and 10 percent in Somali.

"This newspaper has a lot of stuff with Somali people," said Abdi Hussein, a Somali resident. "Some Somali people don't have information or news to know what's going on here in the United States, or Minnesota; that is why we like the newspaper."

Thus far Sanchez has personally funded the venture. "...if it generates or doesn't generate any money, we'll just have to wait and see where this goes, but in the meantime, that's what's most important, the satisfaction of helping people," she said. The eventual aim is a bi-monthly publication if the newspaper can source significant advertising revenue.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 10:59

Torstar Corp. posted another quarterly loss as cost cuts were unable to recompense the ongoing economic struggles at the company's newspaper and digital operations, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday.

The Toronto based media company reported a loss of C$4.4 million, or six cents a share, for the second economic quarter. For the same period in 2008 the company registered a $36 million profit or 46 Canadian cents per share.

The company suffered on the back of a $29.9 million charge relating to a valuation allowance against certain future income-tax assets. Without this cost Torstar said it would have recorded a $25.5 million profit for the second quarter.

The company's revenue was slightly down on a year-to-year analysis to $373.3 million from $398.8 million.

Torstar has ownership stakes in daily newspapers, community newspapers, online properties and international book publishing assets. Its premium publication is the Toronto Star newspaper, Canada's largest daily newspaper.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 10:58

Texas weekly newspaper, the Northwest Tarrant County Times-Record, which served Saginaw and Lake Worth areas, printed its last issue on Wednesday, as the ad market and local competition left the paper starved for revenue, the Star-Telegram reported Wednesday.

Art Jones, who has published the paper with his wife Joan since 2001, listed the arrival new local newspaper The Eagle and two coupon mailing firms as the the catalyst for the Times-Record's closure.

Jones, who built the paper from an initial circulation of 600 copies per week to 2,500, said revenue first dropped in August last year and in February the newspaper had begun accumulating debt.

"We really didn't try to sell it," he said. "I talked to a couple of (newspaper) brokers. But I just didn't want to go through that exercise."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-30 10:56

An Armenian newspaper has been launched in the disputed South Ossetia region, in order to serve the 23,000 person Armenian community in the region, Asbarez.com reported Tuesday.

The Erebuni Armenian National Cultural Company started the newspaper, which is now already two issues deep. The publication will address Armenian history and current public figures as well as daily news reporting on issues that affect the area's Armenian community.

"We hope that the newspaper will become a full and impartial information resource about the community life, will assist the re-birth of our people's Christian soul and national self-consciousness," said Erebuni Company President Vitali Litvinov.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 20:07

Independent Newspapers Inc., based in Eastern Michigan, will begin a citizen journalism programme for residents of Macomb County, Editor & Publisher reported Wednesday.

The Press has begun to receive regular contributions from citizens. At present, the group is fielding e-mails from interested citizens with the opportunity available to work on one of the Independent's publications including The Macomb Daily, and weeklies The Voice, The Armada Times, and the Advisor & Source Newspapers.

"They wanted to replicate some of the things they'd done at The Oakland Press (Journal Register daily based in Pontiac, Michigan), which has a really thriving citizen journalism program," Jeff Payne, editor at New Baltimore weekly paper The Voice, told E&P.

The contributing citizens selected will receive one day of training in late August or early September and will then be paired with a staff member.

"I really don't care if one person or 10 people get involved - if it improves our local news content, and means greater involvement with the community, it will be a success," Payne said, according to E&P.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 15:02

The Starkville Dispatch, launched earlier this month, is the first free daily to serve the southern U.S. state of Mississippi, Newspaper Innovation reported.

The daily is an affiliate of the paid-for Dispatch title which already circulates in other areas of the "Golden Triangle" including Mississippi and western Alabama.

The free edition will serve Starkville and the Mississsippi State University community and will also be offered for home delivery at a price of $12 a month.

In the first issue of the paper, publisher Birney Imes said in a time of "doom and gloom" for newspapers, the paper's staff "hope this expansion will show that our industry is not only viable but essential to the Golden Triangle"

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 12:10

Strikes planned to take place at the UK's Trinity Mirror newspapers in Birmingham on Thursday have been called off by the National Union of Journalists, Press Gazette reported.

The proposed strike was met with strong opposition from Trinity Mirror upper staff members, with managing director Georgina Harvey calling the decision to strike "reckless and negligent." However, the reason for the strike's cancellation is due not to its negative reception but rather to a confirmation on the part of the publisher that no posts would be job cuts at the Birmingham-based papers.

A statement issued by the NUJ said the union "worked closely with BPM Media management to avoid job losses and are relieved that no union members will be made compulsorily redundant this week."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 11:58

Times Publishing Co. announced in a press release an offer to sell GOVERNING and all associated properties, including a monthly magazine, Web site, and event-based products.

GOVERNING's magazine has a circulation of 80,000 subscribers along with its companion Web site "which is visited by an equally large and influential audience." The publication also sponsors the Public Officials of the Year Awards.

Times Publishing has recently sold its CQ Press books as well as its Congressional Quarterly.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 11:08

Attributor, a start-up that offers ad revenue sharing services to newspapers and blogs, "wants to bring the ad networks into the mix, to allow them to be the revenue distributor that looks not only at the site that offered up the news story but also the news outlet that created the story," ZDNet Senior Editor Sam Diaz commented in his blog.

Diaz applauds the start-up's business model, saying the proactive approach to generating revenue from news aggregation is sorely lacking amongst newspaper executives who, according to Diaz, "knew only one way to respond: cry foul" when they saw their old business models being challenged.
Ultimately, Diaz writes that Attributor offers as "a smart idea that could be part of the overall transformation" of the new business models for newspapers, which must find a way to turn a profit from their aggregated content.

The New York Times referred to Attributor as "more carrot than stick." Although the start-up's plan faces legal obstacles, it has received the attention of The New York Times Co., the Washington Post Co., Hearst, MediaNews Group, Reuters, McClatchy and Conde Nast.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-29 00:40

The Audit Bureau of Circulations has given preliminary approval to community newspaper orientated auditing service, Editor & Publisher reported Tuesday.

The ABC Community Newspaper Audit proposal was accepted at its July meeting in Chicago last week and could be available to U.S. and Canadian publishers with newspapers with less than a paid circulation of 25,000 by January next year, dependent on ABC board approval.

The community audit will offer smaller newspapers a reduced cost and process audit with fees beginning at a $2,000 flat annual fee.


"This is a significant new service offering that directly addresses the challenges many community newspapers face today," Kirk Davis, president and COO of GateHouse Media, said in a statement. "Many publishers in this category will likely see savings of 25% to 50%, with the quality and brand draw of an ABC audit to help them attract local, regional and national advertisers. I think it will have widespread appeal for many newspapers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-28 20:28

The New York Times Co. value increased the most since February of this year on the back of speculation of profit increase, leading a group of newspaper publishers with similar results, Boston.com reported Tuesday.

According to Edward Atorino, a New York-based analyst at Benchmark Co., the Times Co. will earn nine cents a share next year as profits rebound after a 2009 loss. The company surpassed all expectations when it posted significant second quarter profits after significant cost cuts at both The New York Times and the Boston Globe.
"The doomsday scenario no longer applies,'' Atorino said yesterday, according to Boston.com. "The quarter was bad, revenue was awful, but cost-cutting was remarkable. Some who thought they were going to go out of business have to buy stocks.''

Times Co. shares rose 16 percent to $7.71, its highest price since December. Gannett Co. also had significant value growth with a 12 percent gain to $6.52 a six month high. McClatchy Co., formerly forced into delisting from the NYSE, had a 19 percent gain to finish at $1.39.

The three publishers have watched their share prices decline for four straight years and have lost more than 80 percent of their value since 2004.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-28 20:07

U.S. regional bilingual newspaper, La Costa Latina, beginning Saturday will extend its coverage area and will now be available from Mobile to Panama City, PNJ.com reported Tuesday.

The free newspaper is published in Spanish and English and will be the first such free paper in the Mobile area. The newspaper's circulation is expected to now reach 10,000 copies.

"We hope to be distributing from New Orleans to Tallahassee by year end," said Grace Resendez McCaffery, president and chief executive officer of Latino Media Gulf Coast Inc.

La Costa Latina can be picked up in Pensacola, Pace, Milton, Gulf Breeze, Navarre, Crestview, Niceville, Valparaiso, Fort Walton Beach and Destin in Northwest Florida; and Robertsdale, Foley, Summerdale and Gulf Shores in Alabama; and at the paper's website www.LaCostaLatina.com.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-28 19:52

The UK's public broadcasting station, the BBC, will team up with four major national newspapers in order to provide video content for their online editions c21media.net reported.

The videos will be embedded in the sites of the participating papers; The Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Guardian, and Independent. Video content will appear along with the papers' own unique content on politics, business, science and technology.

The partnership is included in the BBC's "Project Marquee" which aims to "share content, expertise and technology in the name of public service."

Speaking of the new collaboration as well as the mounting pressure on the BBC to spread its wealth, Guy Ruddle, Telegraph's head of visuals said The Telegraph has "been waiting for the BBC to start sharing its content with us and this is definitely a step in the right direction in promoting partnerships."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-28 18:55

A recent survey conducted by top10-broadband.co.uk found that Virgin Media is the top ISP to use Twitter "most effectively," TechWatch.co.uk reported.

Among the top ISPs on the list following Virgin were BT, Vodaphone, TalkTalk and Be. The companies' use of Twitter seems mainly for customer service purposes, which the employ to "defend themselves" on the site against users Tweets complaining about their broadband service.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-28 16:52

Apple hopes to release a full-featured, tablet-sized computer that would compete in the e-reader category before the Christmas season, according a Financial Times report on Monday.

The device is rumoured to feature a touch screen that would be up to 10 inches diagonally. It would likely boast a similar Internet service as the iPod touch supporting access to the Internet and Apple's online services. The tablet computer would probably not have mobile phone capabilities, but has been described as "a colour, flat-panel TV to the old-fashioned, black and white TV of the Kindle," a publishing executive told the FT.
The device is being labelled as Apple's next entertainment industry revolution and will support movie and album sales.

The larger screen will support interactive offerings from the music industry in the form of album booklets and liner notes, encouraging full album online purchases, an area the iTunes music store has disappointed.

Hollywood executives said the proposed format would allow them to contribute more content to the iTunes stores and video game publishers have also expressed interest in adapting existing games to the new hardware display, the FT reported.

Book publishers have also been in discussion with Apple about the new products role in their digital existence and hope the new tablet computer will also offer an e-book service to compete with the Amazon Kindle and Sony e-reader.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-27 19:47


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