Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


June 2009

The Latvian Post, the country's national mail service, revealed that it is considering reducing its newspaper delivery service to five days a week due to a drop in subscriptions and ongoing economic stagnation, Hellmail.co.uk reported on Monday.

The publicly held company has found the current six-day delivery service costly and has asked publishers whether this service is still needed given the dip in subscriptions. The postal service is already engaged in cost cutting measures.

A formal decision is yet to be reached by the company on the change to five-day delivery and would require ministerial approval before implementation.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-30 19:41

Last Wedensday, the newly formed Association of Newspaper Publishers in Cameroon (NEPAC) announced its presence with a visit to the Cameroon Minister of Communication, Jean Pierre Biyiti bi Essam, in which the association discussed communications policy, AllAfrica reported Tuesday.

Led by association President Zachee Nzoh Ngandembou, the NEPAC explained the objectives and plans of the association. This includes the establishment of a self-regulatory body aimed at the growth of a responsible and ethical journalism profession, as well as plans to work in conjunction with the government to help the state introduce and implement social communication policy. The association will also look to the government policy support for increased advertising income.

In an NEPAC press release, Jean-Pierre Biyiti bi Essam was quoted as saying that the objectives and proposals of the association were homogenous with the minister's ambitions to revolutionise the Cameroonian industry.

NEPAC was formed in March as a collaboration of publishers hoping to solve the shared problems of the Cameroon media industry, while improving journalism standards and growing the country's newspaper industry.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-30 18:45

According to a report by a union official, the St. Paul Pioneer Press has started to discharge employees, The Associated Press reported today.

Mike Bucsko, executive officer of the Minnesota Newspaper Guild Typographical Union, revealed that the employees to be laid-off were told this morning. Bucsko would not comment on the numbers involved.

Pioneer Press Editor Thom Fladung declined to comment.

The Pioneer Press employs around 140 newsroom staff and had last month requested the union for $2 million worth of wage and benefit concessions before settling for $1.1 million.

The Pioneer Press is owned by Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., publisher of 54 daily newspapers in 11 states.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-30 09:50

Mike Wilcox, the former publisher of the Citizen, is launching a new paper to serve Hamtramck, Michigan, titled the Hamtramck Review, Detroit Web site Model D reported.

After the Citizen shut down earlier this year, Wilcox said he decided to continue where the paper's 75-year run left off by starting the Hamtramck Review.

The new paper will report almost exclusively on local news, as well as market advertising to local businesses.

A fixed staff of five, along with a few interns, will generate content. Addressing the challenges facing newspapers today Wilcox said, "I think I know how to make a newspaper work, even a printed paper" adding, "I still believe the Hamtramck community is very viable."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-30 09:38

Illinois' Carmi Times has invited local businesses to take part in an auction that will be held exclusively through their newspaper, The Carmi Times reported.

Times advertising executives plan to contact local establishments and offer them the opportunity to put their products up for auction. A full-page list of the available items will then be published in the newspaper's July 13 edition, along with a "bid ticket" that readers can use to name their price on the proposed merchandise.

Once the bids have been reviewed by the newspaper staff, another full page ad will announce the highest bids for the items and offer readers another bid ticket. The auction will continue until July 30, when highest bidders will be notified and be given a certificate redeemable for their chosen item.

In exchange for offering products, local businesses will be granted advertising space in the paper equal to the value of the items offered up for auction.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-30 09:25

The Graphic Arts Show Co. will hold its showcase, called "Print '09," in Chicago in September, Newspapers & Technology reported. Despite the economic challenges facing those in the print industry, GASC President Ralph J. Nappi said he remains optimistic about the future, as "the industry is experiencing a tough time, but we will survive and the most adaptable companies will thrive."

The show is planned for Sept. 11-16. In light of the dire economic situation, the GASC is planning to offer as much as US$3 million in credit to vendors and exhibitors to help with expenses associated with installation and set up of machinery and booths at the exhibit.

Newspapers will take center stage at the show, in an attempt to compensate for previous cancellations of the International Newspaper Group's events among other newspaper-oriented exhibitions.

The show will include a newspaper pavilion, where events and information aimed at professionals in the newspaper industry will be presented. A special "newspaper segment" will also take place September 14, according to Newspapers & Technology.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-30 09:03

As the bottom has progressively fallen out of print advertising and the economic downturn has left publishers in many parts of the world parched of advertising income, original sources have become increasingly skeptical of giving up their content for free. Many argue that publishers' reliance on advertising online, while not making users pay for content, is flawed, and has sacrificed the perceived value of quality content.

Yet those across the publishing industry are looking for solutions, and two separate initiatives have taken complimentary approaches to the now crucial promotion and defense of the value of online publications. The first, a work in progress, is an attempt to generate circulation revenue from online subscriptions. The second defines a group of communication standards for publishers and authors that attempts to translate the use rights of copyright law onto the Internet. Both aim to give publications an opportunity to defend their content while also creating and marketing a valuable product.

Steven Brill (left), of Journalism Online, and Mark Bide, of ACAP

Paying for content

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 19:33

The nonprofit online news site MinnPost will offer "real time" advertising using platforms such as Twitter or RSS feeds to publish updated offers and advertisements for local businesses at under $100 a week Poynter Online reported.

Creator and publisher of MinnPost Joel Kramer said the intention of this new ad format is "to create a fast-paced marketplace, full of advertisers' messages that are newly posted and thus up-to-date."

If it proves to be successful, this new form of frequently updated advertising could supplement losses in ad revenue from national clients, large local businesses and public ordinances.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 17:00

Thailand news service, Thailand-Today.com, has extended its reporting coverage to include a number of popular Thailand related blogs, The Open Press reported Monday. This is in addition to its presentation of Thai breaking news and newspaper headlines.

"The importance of blogs - as a popular form of personal news publishing - is skyrocketing. Blog authors are quick to publish news and express their views on topical subjects. We observe that more and more people read Internet blogs to obtain news, analysis and commentary - also on Thailand related matters," said Amanta Sriwastigul, spokesperson for Thai Today.

"What is more, on Thailand-Today readers find all their Thailand news in one site which saves them a lot of their valuable time. Newspapers around the world - and from now on also bloggers - also benefit because we drive targeted traffic to their Internet sites," Sriwastigul added.

The Web site aggregates a large number of local and international sources, including the Bangkok Post and The Herald Tribune. All the news is reported in English, allowing the Web site to serve foreigners based in Thailand and Thais living overseas.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 16:58

New York Times Co. Chairman, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., revealed that the Boston Globe, already subject of extensive cost cutting measures, is likely to face more concessions in the near future, Bloomberg reported Thursday.

"There will be still more to come," Sulzberger stated in a memo to employees. "The Globe is on a path to a more secure financial future."

The Times Co. has already secured US$10 million in savings from the Globe's three smaller unions and the Boston Newspapers Guild, the newspapers largest union, will vote on a new contract proposal in July. The new contract will see wages cut by 5.9 percent and concurrent benefits cuts. Union members narrowly rejected the previous concession proposal that included an 8.4 percent pay cut, on June 14.

The Times Co. sought $20 million worth of cost saving measures from its unions, half of which was requested from the Guild. The publisher has predicted the struggling Boston newspaper will lose $85 million this year.

"The Globe was one of the first metropolitan newspapers to be deeply affected by the secular and cyclical forces that are now roiling the entire media industry," Sulzberger said in the memo.

The Times Co. also made $18 million in savings through printing integrations, cuts for non-union staff and raising the price of the newspaper at both the newsstand and for subscriptions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 14:18

The shutting down of the Ann Arbor News next month will result in the first "no newspaper town" in the United States, the Seattle Times reported.

The paper's parent company, Advance, plans to launch an online news site called AnnArbor.com which is said to be a new project that will accept applications from former News staff members, but won't necessarily keep or rehire previous employees.

Poynter's Rick Edmonds reported that reporters and editors from the Ann Arbor News can reapply for positions with AnnArbor.com, "but the pay scale is being dropped to the mid-$30,000 range for reporters," a $20,000 drop for many from their original salaries.

Industry experts have speculated that the demise of Ann Arbor's newspaper industry is due to its literate, young, and tech-savy readers, who are less likely to subscribe to and regularly read newspapers.

Tony Dearing, content director for the nascent AnnArbor.com said as much in an interview explaining, "there are a lot of things about Ann Arbor that make it harder to succeed as a print daily paper. Print papers do a little better with an older audience and Ann Arbor is a little younger."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 13:34

Following a mostly unsuccessful attempt to swap US$1.15 billion of its $2 billion debt with noteholders, McClatchy had been downgraded to "RD" status by Fitch Ratings signifying "a default on some but not all" of the company's debt, Editor & Publisher reported.

The downgrade is not an uncommon occurrence in the industry, as credit analyst Mike Simonton pointed out when he wrote that "the ratings reflect Fitch's belief the default is imminent or inevitable. Fitch notes that more than five newspaper groups have filed for bankruptcy protection in the past six months."

The offer to trade debt for discounted notes at a higher interest rate was accepted by only 9 percent of parties with holdings in the company. Despite their lauded attempts to buy back debt, McClatchy is still rated as junk or a "non-investment grade" company by credit ratings agencies.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 13:23

The Dublin-based Independent News & Media (INM) has been granted an extension on the repayment of a €200 million bond, Reuters reported Friday.

The media conglomerate, which had already extended its bond repayments due on May 17 to June 26, was granted a further postponement until July 24 by its principal banks and bondholders.

"The extension of the standstill period will allow ongoing constructive discussions to continue between all key stakeholders in relation to the group's financial restructuring.''

The publisher's heavy debt load mounted after extensive overseas expansion, reaching €1.4 billion, and financial woes mounted due to the economic downturn and resulting plunge in advertising revenue, Reuters reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-29 13:14

Although the first news service to report the sudden death of pop legend Michael Jackson was celebrity gossip site TMZ, using anonymous sources, technology writer Mike Elgan reported a fake news story had been created by a non-existent news service, Global Associated News, even before. Also before TMZ broke the story, Twitter users began linking to the fake story at more than 10 per second for more than half an hour, with Twitter co-founder Biz Stone saying the microblogging site "saw an instant doubling of tweets per second the moment the story broke," which slowed Twitter and at times, even caused it to stop working, PC World reported.

"I can't prove it, but I think TMZ fell for the hoax, hundreds or thousands of news organisations all over the world linked to the TMZ story, but then the fake story became real when Jackson died nearly an hour later," Elgan stated.

Graphic: Akamai Net Usage Index: News

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 21:53

As part of the annual "What Teens Want" conference, The Nielsen Company has released a study titled "How Teens Use Media." The results show that the younger generation are still using many traditional forms of media.

"The notion that teens are too busy texting and Twittering to be engaged with traditional media is exciting, but false," according to the executive summary. The study shows that teens are making use of all forms of media new and old.

Television still dominates teenage media use, with an average of three hours and 20 minutes watched per day. The results show TV as more popular than ever with a 6 percent increase in the U.S. over the last five years.

Online media pails in comparison. The study found the average teen watches only 11 minutes of online video per day, equating to an average of around hours hours per month. This is less than other age brackets. Adults between ages 18 to 24 watch watch five hours and 35 minutes per month and even those aged 35 to 44 out-view teenagers with three hours and 30 minutes per month, MediaWeek reported on the study.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 20:19

A new deal between the Huffington Post and ad agency AdGent 007 will lead the way to a new ad campaign for the news site, targeted at an international audience, Journalism.co.uk reported.

According to a press release, the advertising company's goal is to "combine its on-the-ground global sales force with modern targeting technology to help The Huffington Post monetize its growing international traffic."

The Huffington Post is not only aiming to enter into the international market, but the hyper-local market as well, with its recently launched New York site, adding to the existing Chicago site and a proposed site that will focus on the Denver community.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 19:13

GroupM has revised its prediction for 2009's global ad spending decline, estimating a 5.5 percent drop, up from the initial 4.4 percent fall forecast in March. This equates to $417 billion in advertising spending, MediaBuyerPlanner reported Wednesday.

The media analyst group believes the advertising climate will begin to plateau next year, predicting a 1.4 percent decline for 2010, with spending coming in at $411 billion.

North American spending is expected to fall 6.1 percent, with $151 billion worth of spending. This comes on top of a 2 percent decline for 2008.

Television dominates U.S. advertising spending, taking up 44.2 percent of the market. Magazines rank second with an 18.4 percent share, according to GroupM.

Interactive media continues to develop globally. In the United States, interactive media, the third largest medium in the country, will take 17 percent of the advertising revenue, up from 15.4 percent from 2008. The UK has the largest interactive media spending where it dominates 30.9 percent of the market share. Denmark is second where interactive makes up 28.4 percent, GroupM reported.

GroupM predicts newspapers will fall to fourth largest advertising forum behind the Internet. The company predicts papers will hold a 13.6 percent share in 2009 and 12.4 percent in 2010.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 17:00

A research report published by BabyCenter finds that mothers with young children are spending an increasing amount of time on social media sites and less time reading magazines and newspapers, Media Week reported.

The Center's report, which relied on information gathered through a variety of surveys answered by 25,000 participants, found a 52 percent increase in mothers who claimed to frequent social media sites compared to a study conducted in 2006.

Newspaper readership also seems to be on the decline with regards to this particular demographic; 46 percent of respondents to surveys said they read newspapers less after the birth of their child.

BabyCenter's chairman and global president TIna Sharkey commented on this finding saying, "In just a few years, we think moms using social media will eclipse those that are using newspapers."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 16:56

The DIY social network platform GROU.PS has received a second round of funding from Golden Horn Ventures, which invested US$1.1 million in the company last year and committed to giving the startup another $1 million this year, paidContent reported.

The company reportedly counts more than 100 million users that have created 40,000 online networking groups, putting them in a position to compete with other popular Do-it-yourself sites such as Ning and KickApps.

GROU.PS platform allows users to create photo albums, maps, calendars, amongst other options. Along with basic revenue generating methods such as the use of Google Adsense ads, users of GROU.PS are also able to charge membership fees to the groups they have created.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 15:27

This weekend members of the National Newspaper Publisher Association, which represents more than 200 newspapers owned by African Americans, will meet in Minneapolis for the group's annual summer conference, Minnesota Public Radio reported Thursday.

The Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder and Insight News are co-hosts of the event. Insight News publisher Al McFarlane said newspapers under the group's umbrella are facing all the challenges of the digital age and the turbulent economic climate, just like other newspapers across the United States.

"We, like everybody else, are concerned about the impact of the coming digital age. We're newspapers, but we know newspapering today and in the future means more than just our print editions," said McFarlane, according to MPR. "As we speak, there's a major workshop on online strategies, online advertising."

Newspapers published for black audiences in the United States have a weekly audience of more than 15 million readers and are able to utilise their access to a unique market.

"We have a special relationship with a specialised market - therein some insulation," he said. "Our community values and needs the access we provide them."

The convention will also see the newspaper representative meet with members of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-26 15:14

The World Association of Newspapers and IFRA, the leading international associations for print and digital news publishing, have merged into a new organisation, the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).

The combined new organisation will represent more than 18,000 publications, 15,000 online sites and over 3000 companies in more than 120 countries. WAN-IFRA is dedicated "to be the indispensable partner of newspapers and the entire news publishing industry worldwide, particularly our members, in the defense and promotion of press freedom, quality journalism and editorial integrity, and the development of prosperous businesses and technology."

The mission statement of the organisation can be found at http://www.wan-ifra.org

The merger, which becomes effective on 1 July, has been approved by the membership of the two organisations. The new organisation will maintain the two current headquarters in Paris, France, and Darmstadt, Germany.

The two organisations have been discussing a merger, on and off, for more than five years, as they have built up several similar products and services and have an increasing overlap in membership.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2009-06-25 19:22

A Washington Post article that was only published online has left paying readers of the paper's print edition feeling angry and underserved, The New York Times reported.

The article, which recounted the unsolved murder of a Washington, D.C. lawyer, was published on the Post's online edition May 31 and June 1. Its online-only appearance has stirred controversy and debate regarding how newspapers offering both online and print editions should serve their audiences.

While no rules are set in stone, it is widely agreed that longer, investigative journalism pieces should be published in print form, as a means of encouraging readers to pay for print editions. The Post's article, which counted 7,000 words, would be considered to fit into this category.

Another tactic to encourage readers to keep their subscriptions to print editions is by taking the opposite approach of the Post and printing exclusive articles in the print copy, only to post the articles online a few days later.

Nancy Barnes, editor of the Star Tribune, told The Times her paper uses this method "so that readers get something extra for buying the paper...it's more of a reward for our readers who subscribe."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-25 19:03

Medical information firm and USA Today have collaborated to publish a physician database called "Most Influential Doctors," Modern Medicine reported Thursday. The database seeks to provide patients with details on and access to "influential" doctors in specific fields across the United States.

Around 6,000 doctors have been included in the first group for publication on the database. Initial categorization includes diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia specialists, with other diseases and conditions to be included quarterly.

The database draws from a doctor's procedures, referrals and prescribing records, USA Today reported last month. Other information available include records of books and articles published by the physicians, academic achievements and studies the doctors were involved in.

The database gives patients a valuable resource when deciding on health care.

"I do feel strongly that this is a good tool to give people a place to start," says Qforma's CEO Kelly Myers.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-25 18:49

On Wednesday media businessman Jimmy Lai spoke to foreign journalists on the uncertain future of newspapers and the failure of unsustainable model of free Internet content, AFP reported Thursday.

Lai, the owner of the Apple Daily in Hong Kong and has newspapers in Taiwan, fears for the relevance of newspapers to a generation dominated by new technology and said the industry is confronted by a "problem of survival."

Lai advocated an online change to charging for content on the Internet.

"We have got to charge for something. This is not social work," he said.

"I do not know how Twitter or Facebook is going to make money. They are fantastic, but where is the money?"

Lai made his first fortune with the Giordano clothing chain, but got into newspapers and magazines following the military crackdown on the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989.

Lai entered the publishing industry following the events of the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989. Lai has managed to create one of Asia's largest media groups whilst maintaining stern criticism of the anti-Communist Party.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-25 17:04


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