Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


May 2009

The Portland Press Herald's largest union, the Portland Newspaper Guild, is set to vote on concessions proposed by Seattle Times Co. the Seattle Times reported.

Acceptance of conditions offered by the Times could facilitate the company's sale of its Blethen Maine branch.

Last week, The Portland Newspaper Guild agreed to a 10 percent salary cut along with cuts in retirement benefits. The vote addressing further concessions, along with an offer of stock that would grant employees a 15 percent share in the company, will take place Friday.

Negotiations to buy the Press Herald, along with other Blethen Main titles, are taking place with Richard Connor, who is the editor and publisher of Pennsylvania's Times Leader.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-29 12:00

Smiths News ans John Menzies have been granted distribution deals from the Trinity Mirror, striking a blow to thier rival, Dawson Holdings, Reuters reported

While John Menzies has renewed its contract with Trinity, Smiths is engaged in its first contract with the company, which wall last for five years and has an annual value of over 200 million pounds.

Dawson Holdings, however, will not re-up its contract with Trinity. Profits generated from the Mirror last year accounted for 65 million pounds of Dawson's revenue. Along with losing Trinity, Dawson has also seen 463 million pounds in annual profits through major contracts disappear, approximately 67 percent of the company's news divisions' yearly profits.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-29 11:39

Independent News & Media shareholder Denis O'brien said that the survival of the Independent newspaper would need to show profits in order to avoid a sale or closure Reuters reported.

O'brien, who is the company's second-largest shareholder, said in a briefing that he "would love to see the London Independent newspaper survive" adding, "but they have to make a profit."

The news and media group has a total of 1.4 billion euro in debt through its various newspapers, radio stations, and advertising groups in Europe, South Africa, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand.

While O'brien's commentary involved no decisive plans for the paper's future, he did say that he doesn't "believe in having media outlets just for the benefit of journalists" and that these media outlets have "to be profitable for the shareholders."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-29 11:28

Readership figures released for New Zealand newspapers shows increases in all fields, despite recent media cries of the newspaper industry's eminent death, the National Business Review reported on Friday.

Figures for the year to March, accumulated by Nielsen research, found a 14,000 total increase in average readership across all five of the country's major daily newspapers, The New Zealand Herald, The Dominion Post, The Press, Waikato Times and Otago Daily Times.

The Waikato Times and Otago Daily Times recorded the largest increases, up 8000 readers per day, to 105,000 and 108,000 daily readers respectively. The Dominion saw 5000 extra copies to 250,000 average daily copies. The Press increased by 1000 copies to 227,000.

The NZ Herald retained the largest readership base with 586,000 daily copies.

The figures also found large increases for Sunday newspapers. The Sunday Star Times grew by 20,000 copies to 585,000 and the Sunday News was up 3000 copies to 327,000. The Herald on Sunday stood strong at 371,000.

Regional newspaper showed a slight increase over the past year, up by 1000 copies to 1,624,000.

"This proves the power of print is undiminished despite the recession and ill informed predictions of the demise of newspapers," Newspaper Publishers' Association chief executive Tim Pankhurst said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-29 10:43

The representatives for Boston Globe paper handlers became the fourth union to accept the concessions sought by the newspaper's owner The New York Times Co. in order to keep the paper open, Boston.com reported on Friday.

The 26 full and 35 part-time staff, who move rolls of newsprint to the presses, agreed to $400,000 worth of pay and benefit cuts, the union said.

"No one's happy," said Martin Callaghan, the union president. "But they feel they have to do their part to keep the place open."

Globe spokesman Robert Powers said, "We are pleased that the contract has been ratified, and thank the members of the paper handlers union for making difficult but necessary sacrifices."

The Boston Newspaper Guild, the Globes largest union, has set a June 8 date for a vote on the proposed $10 million worth of concessions. Union president Daniel Totten said he will vote against the current proposal, seeking a better offer.

After prolonged discussions with the Times Co. union heads including Totten failed to reach agreement on the proposed cuts, however they said they would take the companies "final offer" to its members for a vote. The union has not made a formal recommendation to its members. The current offer equates to around a 10 percent pay cut as well as other benefit and lifetime job guarantees reneged.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-29 10:32

Dozens of U.S. newspaper executives came together in Chicago on Thursday to discuss the future of the industry plagued by declines in advertising and reader migration online, CNNMoney.com reported on Friday.

Representative of The New York Times Co. (NYT), Gannett Co. (GCI), EW Scripps, Hearst Newspapers, and The Associated Press were all present at the conference held at a Chicago hotel.

The meeting was held under the banner of the Newspaper Association of America, the associations president John Strum said in a statement to Harvard University's Nieman Journalism Lab.

"The group discussed business topics such as protection of intellectual property rights and approaches to the Congress and Administration to address these and other issues," Sturm said.

"With antitrust counsel present, the group listened to executives from companies representing various new models for obtaining value from newspaper content online," the NAA president added.

The meeting addressed the seemingly inevitable change to paid online subscription for newspapers as the industry attempts to create a economically viable print and online model.

Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corp. publisher of the Wall Street Journal that has run one of the few successful pay-per-view newspaper Websites, pronounced the end of free online content in an interview with Fox Business Network.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-29 10:21

The World Association of Newspaper revealed a global increase in newspaper sales for 2008 at its The Power of the Print conference in Barcelona Wednesday.

Gavin O'Reilly, the president of WAN and CEO of Independent News and Media, announced a 1.3 percent worldwide growth in newspaper sales from 2007, with a total of 539 million daily. While the industry suffered heavy declines in the U.S. and Europe, increased sales in Africa, Asia and Latin America help produce an 8.8 percent four year increase.

"The sector continues to grow," O'Reilly said at the WAN conference in Barcelona, describing predictions of the death of the daily newspaper as a "mistake."

While daily newspapers in western nations struggle against an economic crisis and Internet based advertising downturn third world markets are thriving. In areas such as Asia and Africa growing middle classes are feeding a healthy print media.

"But you might say that this growth is taking place in the developing markets of the world and masks a continued downward trend in the developed markets. And to a degree this is true, but not the whole story, as newspaper companies in these markets have embraced digital technologies to further improve their audience reach," he said in a speech opening the conference.

Print based media in India recorded a 16 percent growth from 2006 to 2007 according to a study by PriceWaterhouse Coopers presented at the conference.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 18:22

BARCELONA - Knowing your audience is the key to success on any platform, as newspapers presenting at the World Association of Newspapers' Power of Print conference in Barcelona showed Thursday.

Francis Matthew, editor-at-large of the Gulf News in the UAE; Fergus Sampson, CEO of emerging markets at Media24, which owns The Daily Sun, in South Africa; and Tim Wall, editor-in-chief of the Moscow News, Russia, all represented their own vastly different publications that have one thing in common: they are succeeding in print thanks to fitting with audience needs' perfectly.

Gulf News

Print is "alive and well" in the UAE for three main reasons:

  • Reporting
  • Classifieds
  • Distribution

The Gulf News in particular dominates in the region because it is inclusive to the entire UAE population, as only 15 percent of the UAE's population is native, and the population has doubled in the past 15 years.

The Daily Sun, Media24

Just five years after its launch, Media24-owned The Daily Sun grew to become the largest newspaper in South Africa, with a circulation of 500,000, all by finding, understanding and staying loyal to an under-served, and even non-served audience, said Fergus Sampson, CEO of emerging markets at Media24.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 18:10

Late Tuesday the Arizona attorney general's office withdrew an antitrust lawsuit against the shuttering of the Tucson Citizen by Gannett Co., the Associated Press reported on Thursday.

The complaint was dismissed from the federal court voluntarily and without prejudice, meaning the right to re-file the case at a later date is retained.

The Tucson Citizen published the last issue of its 138 year career on May 16, but has retained its Website and an editorial presence in the Arizona Daily Star.

The lawsuit filed on May 15 by Attorney General Terry Goddard, claimed Gannett Co. had conspired with Lee Enterprises Inc., owner of the Arizona Daily Star, in an attempt to reduce competition, leaving the Star as the only daily newspaper, for both parties financial gain.

The two companies and their newspapers were part of a joint operating agreement, available to newspapers under the Newspaper Preservation Act. This allowed the Citizen and Daily Star to share printing and non-editorial actions through the co-owned Tucson Newspapers Inc.

"At this point, it was highly unlikely that any outcome of the litigation could lead to the reopening of the Tucson Citizen, elimination of anticompetitive activity or a re-establishment of competitive voices in the Tucson newspaper market," Anne Hilby, a spokeswoman for Attorney General Terry Goddard, said Wednesday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 17:24

Australian daily newspaper, The Mercury, has asked editorial staff to take voluntary redundancies due to the "tough economic times," editor Garry Bailey says and The Australian reported on Tuesday.

"We are seeking 10 redundancies with the hope that there will be sufficient volunteers,'' Mr Bailey said.

"However, we will move to enforced redundancies if not enough people put their hand up.''

The redundancy request will apply to all of the Hobart newspaper's 94 editorial staff including reporters, sub-editors, photographers, artists and library and clerical staff.

"This redundancy plan is the result of an extensive review of how we operate, driven by the tough economic times,'' he said.

"We simply need to make our newspaper more efficient but without losing our vibrancy, our connection to our readers and our determination to drive the news agenda in Tasmania.''

The redundancy offer was announced to staff on Monday by Mr. Bailey.

The offer includes a severance package of an initial two weeks pay, then four weeks' pay for each year of employment.

The redundancies will take effect by June 12.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 17:12

Yeman's Minister of Information, Hassan Al-Lawzi has denied a government ban on newspapers, saying the titles disappeared for other reasons, Yemen Times reported.

The government recently passed a measure to limit media's infractions of press law. The Ministry has also openly warned newspaper publishers that they would be responsible for any violations of this law.

Yeman's press laws allow governmental restrictions on publishing which are not clearly defined and therefore open to interpretation.

Al-Lawzi's statement was followed by countrywide and international protests, where demonstraters spoke out against the confiscation and blocking of news sources which occured after media coverage of uproar and dissent in Southern Yeman.

Human Rights and journalists' organizations, such as The Commitee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), have asked the Yemani president to repeal the measure and restore freedom to the country.

In an appeal to the president, the CPJ encouraged him to "put an immediate end to these attacks, order for the Ministry of Information to drop pending harassing lawsuits filed against the media, and order the release of detained journalists and bloggers without delay."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 13:35

Boston Globe employees have drafted a petition in an atttempt to limit proposed pay cuts to 5 percent, Boston.com reported.

Te Boston Newspaper Guild is set to vote on June 8 as to whether it will accept thei parent company, The New York Times Co.'s offer, which includes an 8.4 percent pay cut, a week of unpaid furlough, as well as reduced health care and retirement benefits.

While the petition admits that "significant cuts to our salary and benefits are necessary," the employees hold that limiting the pay cuts will improve the Times' chances of having their offer accepted by the Guild.

The Guild is the last of the Globe's major unions to vote on the cutbacks saught by the Times, totaling $20 million. If the union does not agree to their parent company's terms, Times Co. may be forced to impose a 23 percent pay cut for all employees in order to reach its goal of the remaing $10 million in concessions.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 09:40

CircLabs, a venture between the Donald J. Reynolds Journalism Institute and several media entrepreneurs,is planning to propose new technology that claims to help news organizations in both obtaining loyal readers and introducing tiered payments, Paid Content reported.

A mixture of online content and social media, the technology will offer targeted advertising and news, all the while respecting user privacy with what CircLabs co-founder and principal Bill Densmore called "stringent protections".

The project, called "Circulate" is set to be launched next year. CircLabs says it is in talks with potentail partners, including the AP, but no official deals with news organizations have been announced as of yet.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-28 09:29

The World Association of Newspaper (WAN) will discuss the future of daily newspapers and potential growth strategies at a conference starting today in Barcelona, the AFP reported on Wednesday.

"The Power of the Print" conference, organised by WAN, has attracted hundreds of newspaper managers and industry analysts, combining the presence of almost 18,000 newspapers in the Catalonian capital.

"Print continues to be the main revenue generator for newspapers and it will continue to be for a long time," WAN spokesman Larry Kilman told the AFP.

As readers turn online and advertising revenue continues to collapse, newspapers have "a great need for the exchange of strategies to increase revenues," he added.

The World Association of Newspapers sees the profitable solution as a combination of print and Internet based news and advertising.

Not a stranger to the impact of the industry and economic downturn, WAN postponed its annual conference that was meant to take place in Hyderabad, India this month.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 09:27

Philippine Long Distance Telephone (PLDT) Co. is set to take a 75 percent share in the country's third largest newspaper, the Philippine Star, the company's chairman, Manuel Pangilinan, announced on Tuesday, according to a report by Inquirer.net.

"Malapit na ... hintayin natin 'yan. [It will happen soon ... let's wait]," said Mr. Pangilinan to journalists, BusinessWorld Online reported on Wedneday.

Mr. Pangilinan would not reveal the price of the purchase.

Mr. Pangilinan said he hoped the Philippine Star would take a more assertive approach to its online reporting as well as merging production and marketing operations with BusinessWorld. Each publication will retain editorial independence.

Mr. Pangilinan said the transaction should be closed within the year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 09:23

Belgian newspaper, De Morgen, has announced the layoff of 15 journalist and editorial staff, The Epoch Times reported on Tuesday.

In December the major Belgian newspaper said they would have to fire 26 staff members, but after discussions with union representatives the figure of 15 was reached last week. Two of those staff had decided to leave on there own accord.

Before the bottom fell out of advertising revenue, induced by the global economic crisis, the newspaper had hired a number of new journalists in an ironic attempt to bring in more advertising cash.

Now however, according to The Epoch Times the advertising decline means more redundancies are likely.

The fragile employment conditions are also effecting journalists' writing, according to critics. Belgium newspapers are criticized for declining to tackle the "difficult issues" and this is being confounded by industry layoffs as journalists protect their positions with popularity.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 09:19

KOS Media, an independent and free Kent newspaper group, plans to start charging for certain copies of its paper, Kent on Sunday, Press Gazette reported.

The "part-paid part-free initiative"" will put a price on some of the 100,000 issues of Kent on Sunday that were once free for readers to take in newsstands and supermarkets.

Starting Saturday, KOS Media will print 150,000 copies of their papers, selling approximately 50,000 for 90p each.

Avid readers of the papers are encouraged to subscribe for paid home delivery to ensure they receive a copy.

Paul Stannard, KOS Media's managing director, commented on the high demand for the papers saying, "the copies used to run out very quickly. Newsagents have never stopped knocking on our doors saying: 'We think you should sell this paper'."

Stannard explained that the group's aim is to cover costs of the free editions by charging for some editions. The number of free copies distributed is intended to remain the same.

In 2004, Kent on Sunday was the first free paper to win newspaper of the year at the Regional Press Awards.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 09:16

Following a protest by female Saudi journalists in response to an offensive report appearing in an online newspaper, the Saudi Ministry of Information is exploring the possibility of regulating online news sources, Zawya reported.

The regulations are said to include controls over electronic media that stipulate the sites apply for official permits issued by the Ministry of Information. Owners and editors of the newspapers would also be required to include their names on their site.

The "Anti-electronic newspaper" movement gained support after 13 Saudi newspapers pressed charges of defamation and libel against an online newspaper that published an article accusing female journalists in Riyadh of engaging in unproffesional relations with senior members of local papers.

The board of directors of the Saudi Journalists Association plans to speak with concerned authorities about forming a set of regulations aimed at controlling electronic media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 08:59

The New York Times has named Jennifer Preston as its new "social media" editor, the AFP reported.

An internal memo issued by the Times detailed Preston's duties, including "expanding the use of social media networks and publishing platforms to improve New York Times journalism and deliver it to readers."

The memo also said that Preston would be working with the paper's staff in order to train them in using social media resources "to find sources, track trends, and break news as well as gather it."

Social Media sites mentioned in the memo included Twiter, Facebook, and Flickr.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-27 08:48

North Carolina recently allowed growing suburb Apex, as well as some other towns to loosen advertising requirements for public notices. Such moves, being pushed by governments at state and local levels in order to cut costs, will further test newspapers already struggling for advertising revenue, the Washington Post reported on Friday.

City and county governments believe that change of medium for public notification reflects both a change in readership to online and the need to save money in current economic conditions. Apex was able to save $13,000 by listing notices of rezoning requests and major land development plans on the town's Web site instead of print advertising in the local newspaper.

"This was good for us for this year, that we didn't have to include that advertising cost in our budget," said Keith Weatherly, mayor of the Raleigh suburb of 35,000, which has an annual budget of $27 million.

Pennsylvania, New Mexico, Florida and Arizona all had bills proposing the change of public notification enter the legislature.

The federal government is also interested in the cost cutting abilities of the notification change. The Obama administration, noting a change in reader patterns, said it would save $6.7 million over five years by publishing the federal Asset Forfeiture program online rather than in newspapers.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-26 14:20

On Friday the New York Times was the first newspaper to run the new full-page ad from the Newspaper Association of America. The ad ironically sells newspapers to advertisers, professing their value as a medium for advertising, Editor & Publisher reported on Friday.

"This one took a little different tact," Randy Bennett, NAA senior vice president for business development, said about the ad. "To counter the drumbeat of negative news people are seeing about newspapers."

The ad takes the form of a letter from NAA President and CEO John Strum and acts to debunk recent "myths" about the newspaper industry and its supposed death.

An example reads, "1. Myth: No one reads newspapers anymore. Reality: More than 104 million adults read a print newspaper every day, more than 115 million on Sundays. That's more people than watch the Super Bowl (94 million), American Idol (23 million) or that typically watch the late local news (65 million)."

Strum closes by stating: "This is not a portrait of a dying industry. It's illustrative of transformation. Newspapers are reinventing themselves to focus on serving distinct audiences with a variety of products, and delivering those audiences effectively to advertisers across media channels."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-26 14:10

During recent delegate discussions, Angola and Mozambique have stressed the importance of strengthening bilateral media operations. The meeting expressed satisfaction at current cooperation arrangements and a need to continue to solidify coordination in the media field, allAfrica.com reported on Sunday.

"The delegations welcome the signing between the parties of the cooperation agreement in the domain of social communication," the note on the discussions read.

In a four day trip to Angola, the Mozambican delegate visited the Angola Press Agency, television stations "Ediçães Novembro" and "Televisão Pública de Angola" and its Production Centre. Trips were also made to the State media groups "Rádio Nacional de Angola" and the "Abibal de Melo" Press Centre.

This delegation of the Mozambican Information Office, labelled 'Gabinfo' is a facility of the Mozambican prime minister focused on informing the government on the advance in media organs.

The delegation has been in Mozambique since May 24.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-26 14:04

A union of Zimbabwe journalists is encouraging members to refuse to obey their country's Ministry of Information by registering with the Media and Information Commision, VOA News reported.

The union has said it will not enroll until the installment of the Zimbabwe Media Commision, which many journalists see as a more legal, accredited body than the MIC, which is known to have stiffled the voice of independent media in the country.

Webster Shamu, the Minister of Information, maintains that journalists must register with the MIC, despite the fact that Zimbabwe's Prime Minister has stated that journalists are not legally bound to apply for accreditation with the current commission.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-26 07:32

Huntington, West Virginia's daily Herald-Dispatch plans to lay off employees, Editor & Publisher reported.

The cuts were confirmed by the paper's director of advertising and marketing, Amy Howat.

Howat reported that the paper doesn't have "a confirmed amount" of cuts yet, adding that the paper is not ready to release more information "because some things are still in the process of taking effect."

The Herald-Dispatch's parent company is Champion Industires, a local company which bought the paper in 2007 from Gatehouse Media.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-26 07:04


© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation