Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


November 2007

Publishers around the globe are being asked to implement a new online publishing standard called Automated Content Access Protocol (ACAP), designed to end clashes between publishers and search engines.

Unveiled during a conference Thursday in New York, ACAP was developed at an initiative by the World Association of Newspapers, the International Publishers Association and the European Publishers Council.

These groups believe the new standard will allow publishers “to better protect their intellectual property rights,” the World Association of Newspapers announced in a statement released Friday. “ACAP is the result of a 12-month pilot project which has resulted in a unique communications tool that opens the door to more high level content, giving all content owners the confidence to make their content available on the worldwide web.”

Search engines were also collaborators on ACAP, with representatives from Yahoo Inc., Google Inc. and Microsoft Inc. in attendance at the conference.

“We are not members of ACAP but we are involved informally, as are our competitors,” Joe Siino, senior vice president of intellectual property for Yahoo, said at the conference, according to a WAN release. “We appreciate ACAP's effort to make more content available on the web. We appreciate the concerns of our publisher partners that they should feel confident to make content available to the world. We also appreciate ACAP's really open and collaborative approach. We look forward to working together in the future.”

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-30 22:53

Bill Keller, executive editor of The New York Times, announced in a staff memo Tuesday that “there are going to be layoffs in the newsroom, for the first time in recent memory.”

He also stated that “a hiring freeze will continue, with open positions filled internally, and next year we also expect to eliminate a few management jobs in administrative areas.”

For now, a dozen of newsroom workers will be axed, but Keller noted the paper has still been able to avoid “the kind of drastic staff cutbacks other news organisations have endured.”

Keller pointed out that tightening spending in the newsroom is essential to help the company meet the difficult financial challenges facing the industry. “While we are committed to retaining our competitive muscle, we will be facing some tough choices about where to save,” he added, according to Editor & Publisher.

“Today we notified the Newspaper Guild that about a dozen support positions within the newspaper are being eliminated. We will, for example, be closing the Recording Room as well as trimming a number of clerical and secretarial jobs. The people in those jobs will receive the severance they are entitled under the Guild contract,” E&P reported.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-30 06:28

Yahoo and Adobe PDF have teamed up to launch a new ad product that aims to allow publishers to include text-based, contextual advertisements with PDF-based content, as well as giving advertisers “a new channel with a web-like ability to track ad metrics,” paidContent reported today.

Ads for Adobe PDF Powered by Yahoo! will launch overnight, and is also expected to give readers more access to content in PDFs, once limited to paid subscribers only.

To use the new product, publishers will have to register, then upload a PDF file (created in Adobe Acrobat 8 or earlier). Once this is done, the file will be “ad-enabled,” according to paidContent. The ads are then displayed in Adobe Acrobat or Reader in a panel next to the content. When a reader opens the ad-enabled PDF, it will also display an ad matched to the file's content.

Publishers participating in the beta include IDG InfoWorld, Wired, Meredith Corporation, Pearson's Education and Reed Elsevier. Currently it is limited to U.S.-based publishers and English content.

According to the Associated Press, if a reader prints out the PDF, the ads, which appear next to the document online, disappear.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-30 06:27

Trinity Mirror Plc has bought Globespan Media Ltd. for up to 5.9 million stg. – an initial 0.9 million stg and a deferred amount of up to 5 million stg on the condition of achieving specified operating profits over during the next 30 months.

The newspaper group has said it expects Globespan's revenues to hit at least four million stg in the first year of ownership, Thomson reported Thursday.

Globespan will be integrated with Trinity Mirror's Smart Media Services, a web property business, according to Thomson.

“Globespan strengthens our regional network of over 80 local property sites and enables us to achieve faster growth of market share in the online property sector,” Trinity Mirror chief executive Sly Bailey is quoted by Thomson as saying.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-30 06:25

A daily news publication will debut in Beijing Tuesday – the first giveaway paper distributed at the city's massive public transportation stations.

The metro daily was developed from an earlier entertainment paper, the Star Daily. This 16- to 32-page daily will be distributed to subway passengers for free from Monday through Friday, according to the Beijing Evening News.

Subway papers have grown in importance in Western countries over the past several years. However, they weren't introduced into China until 2003 when the first metro paper appeared in Shanghai.

"We believe the subway newspaper will become a new culture. As the development of subway is speeding up, more and more people will come to like our publication," said Mei Ninghua, president of Beijing Daily Newspaper Group.

As one of the titles under the Beijing Daily Newspaper Group, the subway daily has a circulation of 200,000 to 300,000. Prior to the Beijing Olympic Games next August, it expects to expand further by the Beijing Olympic Games next August, CCTV reported.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-30 06:25

Agence France-Presse has bought 30 percent of the citizen journalism platform Scooplive, which will be renamed Citizenside.

AFP will not be a part of making editorial decisions for the site, which allows users to publish and sell video and photos for commission, Journalism.co.uk reported Thursday.

The investment is aimed at getting AFP “closer to readers,” Journalism.co.uk reported. “This is for us a purely commercial and technical experiment in the Web 2.0 field, to help our clients, mainly in the media field,” said Pierre Louette, AFP chairman.

The French firm IAM matched AFP's investment, and the remaining shares will continue to be held by the platform's creators.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-30 06:23

Mobile ad platform Amobee Media Systems has received a minority investment from wireless giant Vodafone. Previous investors in the company came from Accel Partners, Sequoia Capital and Globespan Capital.

Amobee launched its first consumer trial last year. Since then, it has partnered with carriers such as Vodafone in Greece, the Czech Republic and Spain.

The company provides software delivering ads to a range of mobile content and formats including the mobile Web, WAP, games and messaging. Its system can support brand building, direct response and lead-generation campaigns.

Vodafone had released its first consumer charter earlier in October for mobile phone advertising, which the mobile telecommunications company wants other carriers to adopt, MediaPost reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-30 06:22

Belo Corp. announced Wednesday the new executives for its newspaper group after a spinoff in early 2008.

The U.S. company Belo owns four daily newspapers, including The Dallas Morning News, and 20 television stations. Following the spinoff, the newspapers will be held separately by a publicly traded company, A.H. Belo Corporation.

Belo's chairman and chief executive, Robert Decherd, will become the chairman, president and CEO of the newspaper company, and will also serve as non-executive chairman of Belo's television company, The Dallas Morning News reported Thursday.

James Moroney III will assume the role of executive vice president of the newspaper company, overseeing papers including the Providence (Rhode Island) Journal, The News and The Press-Enterprise in Riverside, Calif. He will also continue to be the publisher and CEO of The News, replacing Decherd on the board of The Providence Journal Co., and will join Belo Corp.'s board of directors following the spinoff.

Skip Cass will also be an executive vice president of the newspaper company, continuing to oversee Belo's Internet, business development and technology activities.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-30 06:19

Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal, said Tuesday it is considering selling the rest of its community newspaper group.

Dow Jones, which is expected to be acquired by News Corp. by the end of the year, had already sold six community newspapers last year and used the proceeds to purchase the other half of the Factiva news database business from Reuters Group Plc.

Murdoch said earlier that News Corp. was likely to sell the remaining community newspapers after the Dow Jones deal is complete, FinanzNachrichten reported.

Dow Jones's Ottaway newspaper group owns eight daily newspapers and 15 weeklies in seven states, including the Times Herald-Record, in Middletown, N.Y.; the Cape Cod Times in Hyannis, Mass.; and the Inquirer and Mirror on Nantucket, Mass.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-29 06:43

A confidential, pre-sentence report could give Conrad Black a jail term decades shorter than the one prosecutors demanded in his fraud case held in Chicago earlier this year, The Australian reported Thursday.

The report, prepared by a probation officer, limits the extent of the former media baron's fraud to US $6.1 million, rather than the US $32.15 million estimated by prosecutors.

The former head of Hollinger International, now Sun-Times Media Group, only received about US $3 million in illegal funds, according to the defence, according to The Australian.

Black is currently out on bail and staying at his home in Florida.

The report will push for the judge to sentence Black to about five years in prison, rather than the 24 to 30 years the prosecution is seeking.

Black is scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 10. He was convicted on three of six fraud charges, as well as one count of obstruction of justice, in July.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-29 06:42

Bloggers from two popular Web sites in Singapore are worried that a new media study could focus too much on expert views, and are calling for so-called Web practitioners to gather feedback on how the Internet should be regulated.

Yawningbread.org and theonlinecitizen.com have posted notices stating that the government study needs to make room for regular Web users who might not be categorised as experts.

“There is a need for ordinary bloggers – and filmmakers who intend to put video material on the Internet – to get together and organise a submission to the relevant bodies, putting across the perspective of practitioners,” the notices on yawningbread and theonlinecitizen state. “So far, those being consulted appear to be the elite – the experts.”

The study was begun by the Advisory Council on the Impact of New Media on Society (Aims), which was appointed by the government in April to study the social, legal, ethical and regulatory impact of interactive and digital media, according to a Straits Times article posted by AsiaMedia.

Aim's report is due out in the first half of next year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-29 06:41

The Kansas City Star is the latest in a string of mid-sized metros in the United States to offer buyouts to employees, telling readers today that Star employees with 20 years of “uninterrupted service” can take the paper up on its offer, which gives 20 weeks' pay.

“The voluntary program will be limited to fewer than four percent of The Star's nearly 1,400 employees and will not have a minimum job-reduction target,” the paper stated, citing Publisher Mac Tully, Editor & Publisher reported Wednesday.

Those eligible for the buyout have until Dec. 19 to make their decisions, and those who agree to the deal will have a last day of work on Jan. 11, 2008. However, the paper stated that “an unspecified limit will be placed on the number of departures in each division of the paper so that no one division is unfairly affected,” according to E&P.

Tully stated in a staff memo that the Star will not resort to layoffs if not enough employees leave through the buyout deal.

“However, this does not preclude the possibility of future severance programmes as The Star continues to look for operating efficiencies,” Tully stated.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-29 06:39

Further developing mobile phone technology will have a “transformative effect on journalism,” Reuters chief scientist told journalists and colleagues at Reuters' Canary Wharf headquarters Monday night.

Nic Fulton, on the phone from New York, talked about the company's ongoing collaboration with Nokia to develop equipment for journalists.

In October the news service revealed it has been experimenting with technological tools, giving reporters lightweight toolkit that gives journalists everything they need to file and publish news from the most remote regions in the world.

“(Nokia and Reuters) believe that mobile technology is evolving extremely fast to the extent that we can see a time, probably not that far out, I'm sure less than five maybe even three years out, when mobile phones could have HD video capability and they could have extremely powerful VPUs and keyboards,” said Fulton, according to Journalism.co.uk. “You might just start saying that's a laptop. I still think that it will ultimately be a very personal mobile device. So clearly there is potential for it to have quite a transformative effect on journalism.”

In the short term, Reuters sees new technology as complementing the tools journalists already have.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-29 06:38

Johnston Press, the second largest local newspaper group in the UK and publisher of The Scotsman, plans to launch a news subscription service via mobile phone across its 120 titles next year.

The company said it will partner with telecommunications provider g8wave to roll out the service.

Subscribers can choose between either a general news alert service or updates.

Third-party advertising opportunities are under investigation. Trials will be carried out at regional titles first, before they are extended across larger publications.

Johnston Press tried to build up a database of potential users of the service through local marketing initiatives, such as "text to win" competitions and download discount vouchers, which can be used to redeem services and products, according to Brand Republic.

"We are starting at a small base, but growing rapidly. In the past few months we have seen month-on-month growth of up to 40 percent at some titles, but they are still very small numbers,” said Chris Pennock, group newspaper sales and marketing director of Johnston Press.

"What it shows, though, is that there is a market and an interest in this type of technology," Pennock added.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-29 06:37

Internet and cable advertising are prospering in U.S. market, while newspaper and TV are in recession, according to the estimates by Credit Suisse.

The Internet, which made up merely four percent of the total U.S. advertising in 2000, is expected to double to eight percent in 2008, while cable, used to account for seven percent in 2000, could make up ten percent by 2008.

However, traditional media, including newspaper, broadcast TV, radio and magazine, are experiencing a recession. Newspaper and TV declined most seriously, from 23 and 21 percent in 2000, to 19 and 18 percent in 2008, respectively. Radio and magazine slid up to two percent from 2000 to 2008.

Direct mail, which accounted for 20 percent in 2000, beats newspaper and TV and gains the lion's share of 23 percent in 2008.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-29 06:35

Lebanon's An-Nahar newspaper announced the launch of its new children's supplement in Beirut Tuesday.

Jarida Kids is aimed at children between ages eight and 12, and was originally thought up by Gibran Tueni, the MP and An-Nahar general manager, who was killed by a car bomb in 2005.

Tueni's ideas for the children's supplement included focusing on cultural, arts and sporting issues. Project editors Jad Harb and Elyssar Moukawem said that they hope Jarida Kids lives up to Tueni's ideals, and will be free from sectarianism or political content, focusing on issues children care about most, The Daily Star reported.

A sample issue of the supplement, which will be published in a mixture of Arabic and French, was released by Harb and Moukawem. It contained cartoons, figures and stories about the environment and nature, quizzes, sports and an advice page in which children have their questions and problems answered, according to The Daily Star.

The first edition will be published Dec. 6, after which editions will be published the first Thursday of each month.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-29 06:34

Although it's been rumoured that Italian media group RCS is interested in the 30 percent of the Spanish Zeta group that is for sale, the group is denying having interest, Newspaper Innovation reported Tuesday evening.

RCS publishes Corriere della Sera and Gazzetta dello Sport in Italy, and El Mundo, Marca and Expansión in Spain. Zeta publishes magazines and several regional newspapers in Spain, including El Periódico de Cataluña.

RCS is also the publisher of City, a free daily in Italy.

Other parties interested in the 30 percent up for sale include Prisa (which publishes El Pais), Vocento and Planeta, according to Newspaper Innovation.

For more information, click here (in Spanish).

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-29 06:32

Topix.com has signed on to run comments sections and online forums for newspapers owned by U.S. publisher MediaNews Group Inc.

Owned by U.S. newspaper publishers Gannett Co. Inc., McClatchy Co. and Tribune Co., Topix began as an archive of online news, and is now a provider of online local news discussion forums.

Although Topix and MediaNews did not disclose financial terms, Chris Tolles, chief executive of Topix, told Reuters the two will share revenue from advertisements on forum and comment pages. MediaNews will use Topix on the sites of its 61 daily papers.

“What we're recognizing here is that this is a place where there's no coverage and no story being told at the truly local level,” Tolles told Reuters.

Topix is going after more local advertising markets, and Tolles pointed out a September eMarketer report that stated local and national businesses advertising in local markets on the Internet will spend $7.8 billion in 2011, compared to the $2.9 billion spent in 2007.

Using online discussion forums is a good way for online newspapers to get plenty of space for ads even as they cut down on the number of reporters they use to produce news.

Topix will be added to MediaNews newspapers' sites in stages, and plans to complete the process by early 2008.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-28 05:51

The Los Angeles Times Tuesday announced several new online features, including a new blog offering readers more access to Reader Representative Jamie Gold.

According to the company, the move will “increase newsroom access to better serve and communicate with readers.”

On the blog, which Gold will oversee, readers are encouraged to ask questions about how stories were covered, point out errors, and seek information not included in articles. The blog will feature “a Q&A-oriented conversation to engage reporters and editors in addressing reader queries and observations," a release stated.

The paper also announced other online features in which readers can ask questions and find out updates.

"Users will be able to view a staff directory, peruse the L.A. Times ethics guidelines and get answers to frequently asked questions about newsroom practices, as well as outside-the-newsroom operations such as how to buy back copies. The Readers' Representative Journal will explore virtually anything readers want to know about the editorial operation of the Los Angeles Times, online and in print," the release stated, according to Editor & Publisher.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-28 05:49

Greek journalists went on strike today, and more than 4,000 of them attended a rally and marched through central Athens to protest the reformation of the country's broken pension system.

The 24-hour strike began at 6 a.m. (0400GMT), after which content on Greek news Web sites was not renewed and state-run and private radio and television news was cancelled. And as no journalists were on the job today, no newspapers will be published Wednesday, the Associated Press reported.

The only journalists exempt from the walkout were those covering the strike, the ESHEA journalists' union said in a statement.

Government press offices also were affected, as they are staffed mostly by journalists, the AP reported.

Journalists will join a general strike across Greece Dec. 12. On Monday, school teachers staged a walk-out. Additionally, doctors at a public hospital and public-sector engineers said they would walk off the job for three hours Tuesday morning, according to the AP.

Labour unions in Greece are opposed to measures the government has proposed that attempt to unify the nation's 170 pensions funds. Future deficits of the funds will collectively reach between €120 billion and €400 billion collectively, which are expected to start affecting the budget within 10 years. Unions worry the proposed reforms would cut future pension benefits and increase retirement ages. The next round of negotiations are set to begin Wednesday, the AP reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-28 05:42

Microsoft and the Danish newspaper Jutland Post (Morgenavisen Jyllands-Posten) have launched a new digital product, a platform called JP2, which mixes print and online venues.

Consumers must download and install a couple of software programs, and launch the JP2 platform. Navigation is different from most, but the layout looks like a real print newspaper.

Right now The Jutland Post is offering a free trial for 30 days. After that, JP2 will be a paid-for feature. However, several U.S. papers are using the same platform, such as the New York Times, Seattle Post, Daily Mail and Forbes.

Ernst Poulsen from Poynter pointed out the biggest advantages and problems of JP2 as follows:

Problems: - Extreme entry level. Users need to install 72 MB of software plus special JP2 software. First time load is heavy. - Slowness. JP2 takes about 25-45 seconds to launch - even when synchronized. - Usability problems. Navigation is unusual and more difficult, and cover pages show fewer articles than a typical Web page. - Looking ahead. Advertising will probably clutter pages when introduced.

Advantages: - Microsoft is backing the software. - Readability. Fonts are easy to read on the screen. - Lots of content. JP2 integrates seven-day newspaper and three sites in one interface. - Updates. It updates whenever the computer is online. - Speed. Navigation is quick after JP2 has loaded.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-11-28 05:41

Telegraph Media Group has commissioned research that reveals that companies interested in recruiting will have the best results with integrated advertising campaigns, which incorporate online and printed papers, onrec.com reported Tuesday.

Telegraph commissioned the research to learn more about the value of newspaper brands, the changing role of national newspaper advertising in an increasingly digital world and the emerging role of online newspaper advertising.

“Papers do the job of creating awareness and driving people to find out more online, because it's online where people research the jobs on offer. In fact, the addition of online allows recruiters to be more creative with their messages, leaving the small print to the online version of the campaign and allowing print to create the awareness it does best,” said Alex Foster, TMG classified sales director, according to onrec.com.

“Secondly, the newspaper brand, whether online or in paper, lends its reputation to recruiters' advertisements. It makes the reader see the job as more credible, have better prospects and be more 'for them' than if they had seen the ad in other, less prestigious environments,” he said.

The main findings of the research, according to onrec.com, are:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-28 05:39

Sanoma Digital has launched a new user-generated breaking news Web site that also gathers material for a series of weekly free newspapers by using an open-source journalism platform.

The Finnish news publisher last month launched Vartti.fi to allow users to upload multimedia content directly to the site.

Editors ask for submissions, and also publish story threads. All the stories are also published in seven local weekly editions of Vartti that are distributed in and around Helsinki, Journalism.co.uk reported Monday.

“With the Jokela High School shooting we had one of the first pictures in Finland (from the scene) which was taken on a mobile phone, we then sold it on to publications in Norway and Sweden,” Janne Kaijarvi, editor-in-chief of Vartti, told Journalism.co.uk.

Contributors are paid about 50 euro for photos that make it into the paper's print edition, and Sanoma takes the copyright, according to Journalism.co.uk.

Kaijarvi also said that the site broke news about a Helsinki train fire. Reporters found out about the fire when a train passenger uploaded a picture to the site that had been taken inside the train.

Vartti.fi is the latest of five news Web site start-ups Sanoma Digital has launched since the beginning of the year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-28 05:38

Singapore and the Phillippines reached a media cooperation agreement today, to be applied to media policy and information exchange, co-production and mutual exchanges and training and human resource development, Xinhua reported.

The Memorandum of Understanding was inked at this year's Asia Media Festival, hosted by the Media Development Authority (MDA) of Singapore.

According to a joint statement, the deal comes as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is forging closer political, economic and community ties.

Singapore has also agreed on media cooperation deals with three other ASEAN countries, as well as Brunei, Indonesia and Thailand. Companies in both countries have talked about collaborating in TV, games, film and animation, the MDA stated, according to Xinhua.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-11-28 05:36


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