Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


October 2007

Rupert Murdoch opened his Eurocentral printing plant in Scotland today, announcing it is the “largest and fastest” in the world, MediaGuardian reported.

The first stage of the UK subsidiary News International's £650 million printing press modernisation programme was also unveiled by the chairman and chief executive of News Corporation Murdoch, who was joined by Alex Salmond, Scotland's first minister.

“This new plant can produce 86,000 copies an hour of a full colour newspaper up to 144 pages in size,” Murdoch said, according to MediaGuardian. “That is three times the speed of our old presses and provides readers and advertisers with greatly improved quality .”

The new full colour, high speed presses will publish the Scottish editions of News International's the Sun, the Times, the Sunday Times and the News of the World.

The Eurocentral plant is located near Glasgow and is the first stage in a £650 million investment in new print facilities across the United Kingdom by News International, which will allow all its titles to print in full colour. The company signed a long-term contract to also print at Eurocentral the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph, as well as the Glasgow Solicitors Property Centres Property Guide.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-31 04:54

Bloggers and journalists have united to launch a Scandinavian citizen journalism portal to create a cross-regional Scandinavian news site, Kristine Lowe reported Tuesday from Oslo.

iNorden.org is “an attempt at setting new standards for civic journalism in our neck of the woods,” the site's founders stated.

The site was founded “in the absence of a media corporation with the foresight to utilise the fabulous opportunities online to create a cross-regional Scandinavian news site,” Lowe stated in her blog, citing Undercurrent. “ ... after all, the regions' languages are more similar than they are different.”

According to iNorden, Scandinavian countries have plenty of common arenas, and while the Internet is an “ideal channel for international dialogue,” there hasn't been a portal established for the countries to share.

“Even though an arena such as this would normally be initiated by the authorities or a sizeable media corporation, iNorden was founded by a group of concerned bloggers and journalists, who, like so many others recognised the absence of a Nordic common ground on the Internet – or anywhere, for that matter,” the site's founders stated on iNorden's Web site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-31 04:53

Rumours of Google's mobile plans have haunted the media and technology sectors all year, but sources close to MocoNews have suggested that the online big shot is going to announce a mobile operating system in mid-November.

The Wall Street Journal received similar information, reporting that “within the next two weeks, Google is expected to announce its plans to bring Google-powered phones to market by the middle of next year.”

“In recent months Google has approached several U.S. and foreign handset manufacturers about the idea of building phones tailored to Google software, with Taiwan's HTC Corp. and South Korea's LG Electronics Inc. mentioned in the industry as potential contenders,” The Wall Street Journal added.

The front-running operators in the phone market are T-Mobile in the United States, and Orange and 3 for Europe and the rest of world. Google's general plan is to create a more open mobile operating system, which allows developers to add more applications.

There are some factors in favour of Google's plan — operators are coming around to selling unlocked phones, and people coming are around to paying for a handset they really want, instead of accepting what they are given. Some are against Google's plan, however, with many operators trying to reduce the number of operating systems on their handsets, paidContent reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-31 04:51

The Times and The Telegraph have taken their Fleet Street rivalries to the desert, this time vying for the attention of the United Arab Emirate's cutting edge business community, Emirates Today Online reported Tuesday.

The Times of London is currently holding a business forum in Dubai, and has been printing 15,000 copies a day in the city since May. On Monday, The Daily Telegraph launched a temporary online edition for Dubai that can be downloaded and printed.

The Times' business editor, James Harding, has brought his staff to Dubai for a week as part of the newspaper's Gulf Business forum. His journalists will stay in the UAE until Sunday to become better acquainted with the country's booming business sector.

“No British newspaper is well sourced in the Gulf in the way you would be in New York or even Tokyo,” Harding told Emirates Today. “The area is transforming itself into a hub for investment, trade, travel and leisure ... We have come here en masse to try to understand one of the world's biggest unfolding stories.”

An executive from The Telegraph told Emirates Today that its new online version is part of a commercial exercise to promote the paper's Web site; however, The Telegraph has “ no plans to publish a newspaper in Dubai.” The executive, who was not named by Emirates Today said that “this is not a newspaper we are distributing and is not a direct competition to other newspapers.”

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-31 04:49

France's Culture Minister said in an interview Friday that the planned sale of French business daily Les Echos to luxury goods maker LVMH is a “private matter,” which does not call for legislation.

“I met LVMH's head, Bernard Arnault. I received the staff of Les Echos and La Tribune. Guarantees have been given. This is a private matter. The journalists, I believe they are independent. I do not think its is necessary to adopt a law,” Christine Albanel told French daily Le Monde.

The Les Echos staff opposes the sale, fearing they will lose their editorial independence, and have staged several strikes and have called for more consultation on the proposed deal. If the deal does go through LVMH could sell Les Echos rival business daily La Tribune, due to French antitrust and media laws, Reuters reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-31 04:47

ImpreMedia, the parent company of La Opinion in Los Angeles and El Diario La Prensa in New York City, is set to become the biggest Hispanic paper participant in Google's Print Ads and AdSense programs, according to a company statement Monday.

ImpreMedia's Spanish-language papers will join about 600 English-language papers in Google ad programmes.

"We're tapping into the ease and efficiency of Google's technology to enable small to mid-sized businesses to reach the Hispanic marketplace in six top Hispanic markets through one integrated source," said Erich Linker, ImpreMedia's senior vice president of national advertising sales in the statement.

The program enables ImpreMedia papers to access "small- and mid-sized companies who may be unfamiliar with, or have never before advertised in Spanish-language media," according to the company.

Besides papers mentioned above, other ImpreMedia papers joining the program include Hoy Nueva York in New York City; La Raza in Chicago; El Mensajero in San Francisco; and La Prensa in Orlando and Tampa, Editor & Publisher reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-31 04:46

When The New York Times changes its tagline from “All the News That's Fit to Print” to “All the News That's Fit to Click,” there is no doubt that the publishing world is facing tremendous change.

According to The Newspapers and Magazines Online report from eMarketer, newspaper publishers in the past few years have experienced an ad revenue migration from print, especially classifieds, to online sites, such as AutoTrader, Craigslist, Monster and Zillow.com. Many magazines with million subscribers have been shut down in favour of branded Web sites.

eMarketer pointed out that magazine and newspaper publishers will spend $536.8 million this year to market their brands online and maintain readership.

Due to the continuous dropping of circulations and of consumers' behaviour to check online before reading print, online ad budgets will grow at a steady pace and achieve $1.03 billion in 2011, eMarketer reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-31 04:44

The BBC has set up a board for complaints following a phone-in featuring the chairman of the Press Complaints Commission.

Callers phoned in to the radio station 5 live to tell Sir Christopher Meyer their complaints against Scottish newspapers.

The long list of comments were made on the 5 live message board, here, AllMediaScotland reported.

Listen to Meyer's guest appearance here.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-31 04:43

The Philadelphia Inquirer will launch its electronic edition in January, according to Pressmart Media Ltd., which will develop and deliver the digital edition.

"Pressmart will co-develop, host and electronically deliver the print-replica eEdition of The Philadelphia Inquirer on its New Media Delivery Platform," the company said in a statement. "Offering Web 2.0 features that include blogs, podcasts, RSS and social media integration, the electronic edition will be delivered on multiple distribution channels to individuals, enterprises and academic institutions."

Pressmart said the eEdition will be a replica of the print edition, and will be available at a regular subscription rate for Inquirer readers. It is expected to go live on Jan. 7, 2008.

“This new media digital distribution channel includes eEditions, Mobile Editions, and Audio Editions for Podcasts. We can now offer our current print subscribers as well as new subscribers a convenient same-day, same-as-print eEdition delivered to their laptops or PC's,” said Brian Tierney, Inquirer Publisher, according to Editor & Publisher.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-30 04:36

The first Ugandan newspaper was recently delivered to Bukwo, the newly created remote eastern border district.

The very first copies of Daily Monitor were delivered to five schools in Suam town council.

"We have been reading Kenyan newspapers and in fact the majority of our children don't know that there are newspapers in Uganda at all," said Martin Kiplagat, the acting chief administrative officer, according to AllAfrica.com.

The papers were delivered under the Daily Monitor's Newspapers in Education project of the Young Readers' Programme. A total of 550 copies will be sent to the district every Monday.

Bukwo District was separated from Kapchorwa District over a year ago. Most of its residents, who seldom travel out of Bukwo, had never seen a Ugandan newspaper.

Kiplagat said residents mainly trade in Kitale town in neighbouring Kenya because of the impassable road that connects the district to Kapchorwa.

"I have no words for Daily Monitor for being the first Ugandan newspaper to dare penetrate Bukwo. It is not easy to access this place," he said.

The product is meant for children, but many adults in Bukwo flocked to the schools to see a Ugandan paper.

Augustine Cherop, the District Education Officer, said that people at Suam, Kamet, Mugoyoni and Chepkwasta primary schools who received the first copies of the paper were ecstatic.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-30 04:34

The privately owned Czech publisher Mladá Fronta AS announced Monday it will launch a free business daily newspaper, called E15, at the end of November.

E15 will be published five times a week, beginning at a circulation of 50,000 copies and will be styled partly after London's City A.M. free daily, according to the Associated Press.

The new business daily could put more pressure on the tight Czech print market, targeting general news dailies and the only Czech business daily, Hospodárske Noviny, owned partly by the publisher of German business daily Handelsblatt, the AP reported.

Traditional daily newspapers in the Czech Republic, such as Mladá Fronta Dnes and Lidové noviny are also facing heavy competition from free dailies such as Metro, which is published by the Czech unit of Metro International SA.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-30 04:32

Gannett Co. Inc. and The Tribune Company announced Monday they will expand the Metromix brand of entertainment Web sites to a network across the United States.

Metromix LLC will launch Metromix.com in the top 30 media markets in the United States, as well as in other key metro areas, a joint release stated.

Terms were not disclosed, but the new entity will be equally owned by the two companies, Editor & Publisher reported.

Metromix, the “one-stop guide to resturants, bars clubs and events,” is currently available in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and other Tribune markets, E&P reported.

“Gannett and Tribune are a powerful combination of deep local market experience, superior content and national scale,” said Tim Landon, Tribune Interactive president, according to E&P. “With this partnership, we can grow Metromix into a true national brand, adding value for advertisers who want to reach a highly desirable demographic.”

Jack Williams, Gannett's digital president, said the partnership means “we can take the established and successful Metromix brand and deliver it – with full authority – to all the nation's top markets.”

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-30 04:31

Chicago RedEye, the free daily tabloid published by the Chicago Tribune, bumped up 50,000 copies to a distribution of 200,000, on its fifth anniversary on Monday.

With the 33 percent circulation increase, RedEye is now the daily with largest distribution in the Chicago area, the paper said.

The additional copies will be mostly distributed in the city, but RedEye said it will also be available at every Metra commuter train station in the suburbs as well as in Chicago.

The tabloid, with readership skewed to youths, was launched on Oct. 30, 2002 as a paid paper.

Last year RedEye grew aggressively, increasing its weekday distribution by 50 percent, and launching a home delivery-only free Saturday edition.

RedEye said its weekly readership is 700,000.

"This milestone marks a terrific five years for us. More importantly, it gives us a chance to welcome new readers to RedEye and provide greater exposure for our growing advertiser base," RedEye General Manager Brad Moore said in a statement, according to Editor & Publisher.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-30 04:30

Media buyers are happy with Yahoo's decision to open up its home page by adding outside links, but said the company should be moving faster to clear up barriers.

Yahoo last week started posting links to other news and content sites on the Featured section for the first time. The effort is aimed to open up the portal and make it the entry site for online users.

Most of the featured links still lead to other Yahoo sites, such as Yahoo's news or travel sections. However, after a series of testing, it has started linking to outside sources, including independent blogs, The Wall Street Journal, or popular sites like Vanityfair.com and Salon.com.

This move shows the broader strategy to transform Yahoo into a more open platform, in order to compete with Google and social networking rivals such as Facebook and MySpace. In addition, the movement includes inviting third-party developers to create new content and social applications for Yahoo.

Digital agency executives generally applauded Yahoo's new policy.

"The walled-garden approach doesn't work. So creating easier exit and entry points and getting people to come back to Yahoo and not hold them there is a smart strategy," said Scott Symonds, executive media director at AKQA, according to Media Post. "I think Yahoo is a great publisher and a great place to put quality brands, but I want to make sure it's keeping up with the marketplace."

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-30 04:28

Paris-based Publicis Groupe revealed results that CEO Maurice Levy termed as “good” for the third quarter of 2007, with “excellent double digit growth” among its two media networks, Starcom MediaVest Group and ZenithOptimedia Group and the recent buyout of digital network Digitas.

Revenues of Publicis increased 10.8 percent to $1.617 billion in the third quarter, compared with the disappointing results of the first half.

In fact, results would have been better in the third quarter, in spite of the impact of a weak U.S. dollar. With constant exchange rates, Publicis' revenues would have been up 15 percent in the third quarter. Results for the first nine months could have approached 12 percent vs. 7.5 percent after the impact of currency exchanges, according to Media Post.

Publicis is not the only global agency holding company to be impacted negatively by the U.S. dollar's exchange rate. London-based WPP Group, and Havas, the Paris-based parent of MPG, Media Contacts and other agencies, also reported similar stories.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-30 04:27

The Sunday Times is the newspaper British readers spend the most time with, according to a National Readership Survey out Friday.

This is the first time the NRS revealed a set of data regarding the time spent reading papers, and will become a standard NRS data release, MediaGuardian reported Friday.

"There has been for many years a mistaken assumption that all we are reading for is two minutes - a drive-by read," said Roger Pratt, the NRS managing director, according to MediaGuardian. "This data shows that this is absolutely not the case. People do spend considerable amounts of their day reading newspapers."

According to the survey, people spend 102 minutes on average reading the Sunday Times, more than 10 minutes longer than the Observer (89 minutes) and the Sunday Telegraph (85 minutes).

The survey validated the idea that people spend more time with Sunday newspapers - 66 minutes on average reading the Mail on Sunday, 64 minutes with the Independent on Sunday and 61 minutes with the Sunday Express.

The Sunday Mirror takes up 46 minutes of readers' time, while the News of the World occupies 45 minutes. The People was read for 48 minutes and the Daily Star Sunday for 38 minutes.

NRS found that readers spent 70 minutes on average reading a Sunday paper, with over half taking an hour or more on it.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-27 05:29

The World Federation of Advertisers has asked the European Union to “closely examine” Google's proposed $3.1 billion (£1.5 billion) purchase of DoubleClick, which the group says has the potential to greatly reduce competition in Internet advertising, MediaGuardian reported Friday.

The WFA sent a letter to the European Union's commission asking the EU to analyse the proposed acquisition as well as Microsoft's $6 billion (£2.92 billion) buyout of aQuantive and WPP's takeover of RealMedia.

Representing advertisers accounting for about 90 percent of global market spending, the WFA warned that “Internet advertisers have benefited from innovation generated, in part, by intense competition,” Stephan Loerke, the WFA's managing director, told MediaGuardian.

Just days ago, EU regulators extended the deadline for the inquiry into the DoubleClick takeover to Nov. 13. The original deadline was set for Friday.

Google has said it would make changes to the deal after industry concerns came flooding in, including not changing some of DoubleClick's business practices.

“Global advertisers are keen to see this competitive marketplace maintained,” Loerke said. “It is hard to tell within such a rapidly changing marketplace what impact these proposed developments might have.”

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-27 05:27

Journalists at the Sydney Morning Herald have protested the newspaper's use of its front page to promote Singapore Airlines Friday.

The broadsheet also devoted a four-page wraparound to Thursday's arrival of the airline's giant A380 airbus. The wraparound included a full-page Singapore Airlines advertisement and three smaller ads for the airline, as well as articles about the arrival of the world's largest passenger plane and other milestones in aviation, The Australian reported Friday.

After peeling back the wraparound, readers found another Herald front page containing other articles.

Protesting staff members said they believe the move breached the Fairfax editorial ethics policy, the paper's charter of editorial independence and the Media Entertainment Arts Alliance code of ethics.

“It shows that our masthead can be bought, it lets our readers down and it places the reputation of our reporters at risk,” said Ruth Pollard, Herald journalist and co-chairwoman of the Fairfax house committee, which held a staff meeting Friday to discuss the situation. “We're horrified ... It's an unprecedented low.”

A unanimous vote at the meeting “condemned Fairfax management for running the spread while a letter, signed by staff, has been sent to senior editors and Fairfax management,” The Australian reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-27 05:26

The board of The Associated Press on Thursday approved a major change on how it prices and packages news to U.S. newspapers.

Instead of offering news feeds defined by the volume of news delivered, the new plan will focus on a core service of all breaking news including national, state and international, with options for adding other services or purchasing stories individually.

The AP's senior vice president for global newspaper markets Tom Brettingen said the plan will “offer U.S. newspapers more flexibility in accessing and using news of local interest that may originate in other regions,” an E&P article stated.

The plan will be effective beginning Jan. 1, 2009. The basic assessment expenses charged to newspapers will be still based on circulation.

AP estimated most of its members would end up paying less or see no changes. According to Brettingen, the changes are expected to cause $6 million to $7 million less annual revenue for the news agency, a shortfall which should be compensated from growth in other areas, such as video and online sales.

"It's an amount we believe we can swallow, and clearly it would be beneficial to the industry during challenging times to have a little bit less to pay us," he added.

Earlier in May, AP CEO Tom Curley noted in a speech that some member newspapers would rather not pay for news they don't use.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-27 05:24

The British government has dropped its proposals to tighten freedom of information legislation that would make rules more restrictive on cost limits for FOI requests and limit media access to coroners' courts and will instead investigate the idea for a freedom of expression audit for future legislation, the UK's Newspaper Society reported Thursday.

“We agree with Select Committee on Culture that a free press is a hallmark of our democracy, that there is no case for statutory regulation of the press, that self- regulation of the press should be maintained and that it is for publishers themselves to demonstrate by their decisions that they can sustain and bolster public confidence in the way information is gathered and used,” Prime Minister Gordon Brown said, according to the NS.

Justice Secretary Jack Straw will now be in charge of considering the idea of the audit across the government.

“The NS is delighted that the Government has abandoned the restrictions on freedom of information and open justice,” Santha Rasaiah, the NS's political, editorial and regulatory affairs director, said in a statement. “We are pleased that the proposal for a freedom of expression audit will be pursued. We hope that the principle will be immediately applied to existing proposals and Bills already before Parliament.”

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-27 05:23

Swiss media group Tamedia AG will launch its free newspaper on Dec. 5. The new publication, named “News”, will have 334,000 copies published for the first edition, the group said in a statement.

The paper is a joint venture between Swiss local papers Basler Zeitung, Berner Zeitung and the national daily Tages-Anzeiger.

The free paper will be distributed in the four regions - Zurich, Aargau, Bern and Solothurn, Finanz Nachrichten reports.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-27 05:21

The Sun's Web site is the latest to switch to Escenic CMS's content management platform.

More than 350 media sites in 14 countries have switched to Escenic Content Engine, including The Times Online and Die Welt, according to an Escenic statement.

The Sun made the announcement at the Online Publishers Association meeting at the beginning of the month, our partner site, Editorsweblog.org, reported Friday.

According to Escenic, Norway business portal Hegnar Online and Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet have also recently gone live on the Escenic platform.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-27 05:19

Japanese corporation Bridgestone has revealed its latest product - full-colour, bendable e-paper - which could be available as early as 2009.

The company has created a 0.29mm-thick, and 20sq cm measured display, which is able to show 4,096 colours.

It also claimed it had created the largest full-colour e-paper in the world, with an A3 offering.

It is now ready to start mass production of the display, and if all goes well, the product could be on the market by 2009.

The product's flexibility comes from a plastic film substrate, which also ensures the image is not misshaped when the paper is bent.

According to Print Week, the smaller e-paper is likely to be used for in-store ads, while the A3 product for larger-size information displays.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-10-26 06:35

Will Metro International, the “Free Dailies King” be dethroned by other free dailies following in its footsteps?

BusinessWeek talked to analysts who say that this may be so, as competitors usually have businesses outside free dailies to fall back on. Not so with Metro.

Piet Bakker, an associate professor at the University of Amsterdam who also writes the Newspaper Innovation blog about free dailies, told BusinessWeek that Metro is in a “precarious position” because it has no other business to fall back on, should the free daily market go bust. One of Metro's top challengers is 20 Minutes, owned by the Norwegian media group's Schibsted, which also owns traditional newspapers and magazines, television and online operations.

20 Minutes has 2.4 million readers in Spain, compared to Metro's 1.7 million there. In France, Metro has 2 million, while 20 Minutes has 2.4 million.

Part of the gap could be do to 20 Minutes emphasizing local news more than Metro does, as well as writing in a lighter tone and having more exciting images and designs, Patrick Bartement, director general of OJD, a circulation auditing group in France, told BusinessWeek.

The free daily market kingdom may be up for grabs, and the new ruler could be the one “who has the deepest pockets,” Bakker told BusinessWeek.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-10-26 06:34


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