Date

Fri - 24.11.2017


September 2007

Spanish media group Promotora de Informaciones SA (Prisa), said Friday it plans to take legal action against United States-based Nielsen Co. for downgrading unique user figures for the Web site of its newspaper, El Pais.

Prisa said in a statement it is calling for an independent audit of Nielsen's “procedures and audience metrics,” according to a Thompson Financial report.

Nielsen made the downgrade due to an advertisement for the site, which also appeared on other Web sites, according to Thomson Financial. The company decided the ad was wrongly counted as ElPais.com traffic.

A Nielsen spokesman would not comment further on the matter, BBC News reported.

Prisa has hired the Washington D.C. law firm Howrey LLP to take on the case.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-29 06:29

Entrants have just over two weeks to submit ideas on how to use digital experiments to transform community news in the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation's Knight News Challenge, a contest awarding as much as $5 million for innovative ideas.

Although 2007 is the contest's second year, it is the first for international entries. The deadline is October 15.

The goal of the Knight News Challenge is to use news and information delivered digitally to “enhance physical communities and improve the lives of people where they live, work and vote,” according to a statement on the foundation's Web site. “Nothing is too far out to qualify ... the contest is open to community-minded innovators worldwide, from software designers to journalists to citizens and students of any age.”

The challenge “hopes to discover innovative ways of using cyberspace to bring communities together,” Alberto Ibargüen, president and CEO of Knight Foundation, said in a statement.

Winning entries must meet three criteria:

1) Use of digital media

2) Delivery of news or information on a shared basis

3) Delivery of that news needs to be to a geographically defined community

Most entries are open to all and must share the software and knowledge created, but there is a category for commercial applications.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-29 06:28

The workforce of the future, journalists ready to go wherever the twists and turns of digital media may take them, are already here. They can be found in the newsroom.

Los Angeles Times Publisher David Hiller plans to mine the newsroom's print side for “a good chunk” of the people to fill some of the 100 spots needed for its latimes.com digital operations, Reuters reporter Steve Gorman wrote in an article Friday.

About 50 people from the print side are already there, even after recent buyouts, which reduced the news staff of more than 800 by about 40 people, Hiller said.

Newspapers today are still doing their best to churn out excellent printed versions, but must also compete online. Ways to do the second part better are to add more video to newspaper Web sites, Hiller said. To do that, the Times has ordered about 100 video cameras which reporters will use to collect more multimedia material for the paper's Web site.

“I think there's going to be a really excellent print newspaper for a long time to come, and we have to do more on the Internet,” Hiller said, according to the Reuters article. “In an era when the simple 'what happened' part of the news is everywhere, you have to do something special which people can't get (in) other places.”

However, he said, times of change in the industry are not without growing pains.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-29 06:26

Some editions of The West Australian are so heavy that home delivering them is becoming an occupational health and safety hazard.

“Newsagents are not meant to be throwing papers that weigh more than 600g and they're throwing papers weighing 1.2kg,” Rayma Creswell, Australian Newsagents' Federation chief executive, told the Australian, according to an article Thursday.

The paper's weight is one of the issues the ANF wants to discuss with publisher West Australian Newspapers.

Creswell said one way to fix the problem is to split large papers into more sections.

“We're not saying 'create a paper that is specifically designed for us,' but we're saying it is an issue,” she told the Australian.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission gave the ANF permission to bargain on behalf of about 380 newsagents for the West Australian, despite Western Australian Newspapers, the Australasian Association of Convenience Stores and the Queensland Newsagents Federation objecting.

“We don't have any problem with the ANF contributing ideas, but we're not seeing them as a collective bargaining agent,” Ken Steinke, Western Australian Newspapers, chief executive told the Australian. “We have individual contracts with individual distributors ... We start from a different premise (than the ANF): what is in the best interests of our customers. We wouldn't do anything that would see costs increase to our customers or our services decrease.”

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-29 06:25

The Bath Chronicle's first weekly edition hit newsstands Thursday, the first time the 260-page weekly replaced the daily edition due to falling sales.

The new edition will be out every Thursday, and cost 60 pence.

The Chronicle has been printed every day for nearly 250 years.

Paul Wiltshire, the newspaper's deputy editor, told BBC News public reaction to the new format has been positive.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-29 06:23

The Walt Disney Company's $350 million purchase of Club Penguin signifies a new focus for marketers and media companies to target kids and teens online.

"For marketers trying reach kids and teens on social networking sites, there is a new game in town: virtual worlds," said Debra Aho Williamson, eMarketer senior analyst and author of the new report, Kids and Teens: Virtual Worlds Open New Universe.

Club Penguin is one of the fastest growing virtual worlds for children. As of August 2007, its registered users exceeded 12 million and paid subscribers were over 700,000, according to Nielsen//NetRatings.

"Of course, virtual worlds are not new, but the level of development activity, venture capital investment and consumer interest in virtual worlds is unprecedented," Williamson told eMarketer.

eMarketer estimates 41.5 percent of children between three to 11 will use the Internet at least once a month in 2007, which represents 14.9 million children online, rising to an estimated 16.6 million in 2011.

Among teens, the Internet is even more prevalent. eMarketer estimates 76.4 percent will go online at least once a month in 2007, rising to 87.1 percent by 2011.

Overall, children and teens make up 18.2 percent of all U.S. online users.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-09-29 06:19

The Yahoo consortium could give newspapers a boost into positive revenue territory a year earlier than originally expected, Deutsche Bank analyst Paul Ginocchio and his team, David Clark and Matt Chesler, estimate.

Since seven newspaper companies announced an alliance with Yahoo in November 2006, another 17 companies and about 400 newspapers have joined, all of which could see online revenues grow year-on-year by 20 points in the second half of 2008, from 20 percent to 40 percent, the analysts reported, according to Editor & Publisher.

At this rate, all involved in the deal could see the move into positive revenue territory as early as 2009, according to the research report.

“We believe the benefits from the Yahoo deal could move the revenue and EBITDA inflection points forward, positively surprising the market,” the analysts wrote, according to a report by E&P.

The analysts believe the partnership means more online inventory and traffic, as well as better CPMs (cost per thousand impressions), thanks to Yahoo's behavioural targeting capabilities and the HotJobs affiliation, E&P reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-28 06:52

The Guardian's union chapel voted almost unanimously Thursday to initiate a formal dispute procedure with management over pay and conditions, the Guardian reported.

About 180 of the Guardian's union chapel voted for the motion, no one voted against it and there were a few abstentions. The vote authorised the National Union of Journalists' Chapel to prepare for a strike ballot, as well as organise a meeting between NUJ national officials and Guardian management and hold a meeting with Acas, an employment dispute prevention organisation.

Guardian staffers are disputing shift patterns, length of the work week, availability of journalists to work across print and web, the proposed replacement of the no compulsory redundancies clause and the implementation of a single house agreement to cover journalists on the Guardian, Observer and Guardian Unlimited Web site, according to a Guardian report.

Guardian News and Media management has offered the staff a two-year, 4.8 percent inflation-only pay deal, which the chapel motion said was the worst attack on working conditions “in a generation,” the report stated.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-28 06:49

The Daily Mail and General Trust Plc Thursday announced it is seeing rising advertising revenues so far this year, and it expects end-of-the-year results to meet financial forecasts.

DMGT, which publishes the London Evening Standard, Daily Mail and the Northcliffe regional newspaper group, made public in a trading update Thursday that its total advertising revenues in the six months through the end of August rose 8 percent from the same period last year.

The rise comes despite a downturn in circulation for both the Daily Mail and the Mail on Sunday, down 2 percent and 0.7 percent respectively, the Daily Telegraph reported Thursday.

Although ad revenues are on the rise, circulation revenues for the 11 months ending in August were 1.2 percent lower than the same period the year prior, in spite of publishing costs dropping 3 percent. Digital publishing revenues for DMGT, however, have risen 74 percent, according to the report.

The group's shares climbed by just over 1 percent in early morning trading Thursday, up 7, to 655p.

In a Wednesday Morgan Stanley report, the bank lowered its earnings per share (EPS) forecast on DMGT by 7 percent, and target valuation by 6 percent to 780p to reflect an expected dip in advertising revenues in the newspaper industry next year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-28 06:47

The debate over whether an EU regulatory body for European telecom markets should be created is heating up.

In a joint letter to the EU commission, economic ministry representatives from Germany, France, England, Spain and Sweden, as well as a state ministry representative of Luxembourg, announced their opposition to such a European super authority, stating there is no need for “institutional reform,” according to Heise Online.

The proposal is expected to be presented Nov. 13.

EU Media Commissioner Viviane Reding said she will resort to regulatory intervention to increase competition in telecom markets if necessary, and is considering creating an EU regulatory body and unbundling major telecom firms.

However, not all EU members agree with Reding, and members of the commission officially say there is an ongoing debate on the subject, Heise Online reported.

The letter, which was also sent to the German press agency, states that the authority of current regulators should be fully enforced first. Those signing the letter also stated their willingness to support efforts to open the market further.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-28 06:45

The global video game market is expected to grow from $33 billion in 2006 to $47 billion in 2009, according to DFC Intelligence.

The newest generation of video game consoles is the driver to this growth. Based on sales so far, DFC said it had raised its forecast for the Nintendo Wii and the Sony PlayStation 3 and lowered the forecast for Microsoft's Xbox 360.

"The Xbox 360 will need to build a strong base outside North America to avoid being in a fairly distant third," DFC analyst, David Cole, said in a statement.

DFC said the Wii would have the strongest sales through at least 2008, but PlayStation 3 game revenue could grow starting in 2009.

"We could have a situation where the Wii sells more hardware units, but by 2012 the PlayStation 3 is generating more software revenue," Cole stated.

DFC also estimated PC game revenue would exceed $13 billion by 2012. Online game subscriptions, advertising and digital distribution were considered the main revenue drivers.

eMarketer's own global video game revenue estimates for 2009 are right in line with DFC's, at $46 billion. Revenues will jump to $54 billion in 2011, up from $34 billion in 2006.

To learn more about the video game report, click here.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-09-28 06:41

Nielsen//NetRatings is advancing in its full audit by the Media Rating Council, which is currently reviewing the patented Nielsen//NetRatings desktop meter and data transmittal processes, the media and market research group announced Wednesday.

“Nielsen//NetRatings has always been committed to measurement quality and transparency, and we welcome the opportunity to have our methodology and patented technologies validated by a respected third party like the MRC,” Manish Bhatia, president of global services and U.S. sales for Nielsen Online stated in a press release.

The group also stated is has begun work on research studies “demonstrating the effectiveness of certain aspects of (MRC) methodology which, as an accreditation service, the MRC has not previously seen or evaluated,” due to the how new Internet audience measurement is.

The Interactive Advertising Bureau announced last week that Nielsen and comScore Media Metrix had both completed their pre-audits, and were moving into the next auditing and accreditation stages.

At that time, comScore was reviewing the MRC's report and proposal for a full audit, but had not yet committed to a timeline.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-28 06:40

Financial services firm Morgan Stanley has cut its earnings targets for three of the United Kingdom's top newspaper publishers to reflect the industry's expected dip in advertising revenues next year, the investment bank said Wednesday.

Morgan Stanley has lowered its earnings per share (EPS) forecast on Daily Mail & General Trust by 7 percent, and target valuation by 6 percent to 780 pence. The bank lowered Trinity Mirror's EPS expectations by 1 percent, with a 4 percent cut to its target valuation, to 505 pence. The EPS forecast for Johnston Press was cut by 4.5 percent, with a target valuation deduction of 9 percent, to 425 pence, Reuters reported Wednesday.

“We believe key lead indicators such as retail sales, (gross domestic product), job vacancies and consumer confidence have recently worsened. We now expect UK newspaper advertising to fall 2 percent in 2008 (from +2 percent previously),” the bank stated in a UK newspaper industry research note, according to Reuters.

The changes were made after the sector's valuations fell about 16 percent in the past three months to all-time lows, Morgan Stanley said.

However, the bank stated, UK newspaper publishers have been trading well, as national advertising returned to growth, causing regional trends to stabilise, with 2007 forecasts up 4 percent since January, Reuters reported.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-27 06:41

Newsstands in Seoul could be eliminated by the end of 2009.

The Seoul city government announced last week it has revised regulations on commercial installations on roads, which affects newsstands, kiosks, shoe-repair shops and others, and will go into effect in mid-November if the city council approves the revisions, The Korea Times reported over the weekend.

The revisions state that those owning more than 100 million won (US$108,589 or 76,861 euro) worth of property will not be allowed to receive new licenses for newsstands or to renew their existing licenses. People in absolute poverty will be given a temporary two-year license, but will have to discontinue their businesses by the end of 2009, The Korea Times reported.

The licensing system began in the 1980s when the government tried to give the poor more financial support. Yet, among Seoul's 3,236 kiosk owners, 28 have more than 600 million won worth of real estate and 116 of them owned more than two houses as of February.

Only 736, or 22 percent of kiosk owners, were in financial distress, the Times stated in the article, which did not mention if distribution points will be added elsewhere.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-27 06:38

Members of the National Union of Journalists at the Coventry Telegraph in the United Kingdom will vote on whether to strike in protest over what they say are inadequate editorial staffing levels, with forty union members receiving their ballot papers next week.

The number of editorial staffers has dropped constantly over the past two years due to not replacing people who leave, or long delays when vacancies are filled, said NUJ members at the Telegraph and its sister papers, the Coventry Times and Hinckley Times, which are part of Trinity Mirror's portfolio in the Midlands, currently up for sale, according to HoldtheFrontPage.

“The result is increased pressure on remaining staff and serious threats to the quality of the product,” Chapel MoC Lucy Lynch stated in a letter to managing director John Bills, according to HoldtheFrontPage.

Telegraph NUJ members voted unanimously to hold a ballot, which they say is due to unsuccessful efforts to resolve the problem via internal dispute procedures.

At a chapel meeting they voted unanimously to hold a ballot, and say this follows unsuccessful efforts to resolve the situation through internal dispute procedures. The chapel also rejected a deal brokered by employment dispute prevention organisation Acas.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-27 06:36

Most marketers worldwide use e-mails in their campaigns, according to a new survey conducted by McKinsey.

This study surveyed 311 marketing executives globally, and found that 83 percent used e-mails, ahead of display ads (73 percent), and paid search (63 percent).

McKinsey also asked about the future of online marketing. By 2010, the Web is generally considered part of the first two stages of the buyer's decision-making process — product awareness and information gathering — for most consumers.

More than 25 percent of respondents planned to increase their e-mail spending in the next three years, but plans to increase spending on e-mails mean they may lose some budget to paid search and other tactics.

E-mail marketing is also prevalent in the United States. Nearly 73 percent of U.S. marketers in a Penton Media Custom Research study said that e-mail was one of their online and mobile tactics.

Newsletters were also popular, picked by at least 60 percent of U.S. marketers, while banner ads, online promotions and blogs still lagged behind.

More details about the e-mail marketing report can be found here.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-09-27 06:35

Kenya's Daily Metro was been added to the Nation Media Group's list of newspapers Wednesday.

The Daily Metro, which targets younger readers and those in lower and middle income levels, will be sold for Sh20, All Africa reported.

The paper appeals to people looking for something lighter to read, and will help bring in younger readers in Kenya who want “easy-read materials,” Linus Gitahi, the Nation Media Group's CEO, said at the publication's launch at Nation Centre Tuesday.

The Metro is the result of more than two years of research, Gitahi said, according to an article posted on AllAfrica.com.

After younger readers are used to reading the Daily Metro, “we will thereafter be able to successfully hand over these readers to the Daily Nation,” he said.

The new paper was modelled after the Weekly Advertiser, but with more editorial content, and will be sold across Kenya, carrying advertisements from smaller businesses, said Neema Wamai, the group's general manager of marketing and publishing.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-27 06:33

With the help of online initiatives, Gannett Company Inc. is recapturing revenues that used to be a given for newspapers.

The company's online assets shows Gannett, whose flagship newspaper is USA Today, has extended its operation beyond newspaper Web sites, to bring in revenue from areas that once used to be newspaper turf only, such as classifieds.

For example, Gannett owns Classified Ventures, in partnership with Belo Corporation, The McClatchy Company, Tribune Company and The Washington Post Company.

To read more on this topic, visit our partner site, Editorsweblog.org.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-27 06:32

The New York Times has made its Real Estate section available in detail to readers on their mobiles, allowing them to send and receive listings whether their property search began in print, online or on The Times mobile real estate site.

The new mobile product was launched Monday in beta, and lets readers search property listings directly from their mobiles, send listings from NYTimes.com/RealEstate to their mobiles by clicking on “Send to Mobile” or send full details and photos of properties listed in the newspaper to their mobiles by using an SMS code from the newspaper, The New York Times Company announced in a statement.

As the newspaper continues its growth outside print, advertisers are also able to edge closer to readers.

Classified advertisers who also sign up for the print-to-mobile feature will be given a text code next to their ad in the newspaper, which will encourage readers to SMS the listing to their mobile devices to view more details and photos. The mobile real estate site also offers new sponsorships.

The new mobile real estate site is part of a wider effort to expand NYTimes.com's mobile presence, while also increasing ad revenue by giving advertisers more ways to target those readers, Denise Warren, senior vice president and chief advertising officer for The New York Times Media Group said in a statement.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-26 06:54

Microsoft Corp. is looking to invest in Facebook Inc., which would value the online hotshot at $10 billion or more, according to a report published Monday.

Microsoft is holding preliminary discussions that could culminate in a $300 million to $500 million investment in the social-networking site, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing unnamed sources who are familiar with the matter.

In exchange for the investment, Microsoft would receive up to a five percent stake in privately-held Facebook, which has previously raised about $41 million from venture capitalists and other individual investors.

Facebook refused to comment on the news, and said the report is merely "rumor and speculation."

An outright sale of Facebook also seems unlikely. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook's 23-year-old co-founder and chief executive, has many times expressed his desire to remain independent. He turned down a $1 billion acquisition offer from Yahoo Inc. last year.

Facebook has been exploring whether to raise more money from venture capitalists to help expand its current payroll of roughly 300 employees and finance other parts of its ambitious expansion plans.

With annual revenues over $100 million, Facebook is believed to be a strong candidate for an initial public offering in 2008 or 2009.

Analysts said if the talks with Microsoft heat up, it could draw Google Inc. onto the negotiating table, too.

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Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-09-26 06:51

Mumbai-based Daily News and Analysis, or DNA, is set to launch an edition in Ahmedabad in October, two years after its Mumbai launch.

Owned by Diligent Media, the joint venture between the Bhaskar Group and Zee, DNA's 2005 launch saw massive subscription drives and aggressive outdoor campaign, which the paper's executives say will be replicated in Ahmedabad, in India's Gujarat region, according to a report by agencyfaqs.

The media group plans to invest INR 100 crore (US $25,300,441 or 17,887,767 euro) in the launch, Ku Rao, Diligent Media's CEO, told agencyfaqs.

DNA will launch first in Ahmedabad with 75,000, and gradually spread to other parts of Gujarat. The Mumbai edition currently has a 400,000 circulation, agencyfaqs reported.

Once DNA has a firm base in Gujarat, it will likely spread to Delhi.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-26 06:45

Nearly a year after the curtains closed for racing and sports newspaper the Sportsman, a new national racing paper is expected to launch October 20 in England.

Racing Ahead Weekend will be edited by former Sun racing reporter Stephen Mullen, who said the new weekly is aiming to avoid the Sportsman's fate, which closed when it ran out of funds after only seven months of publishing, the Guardian reported Tuesday.

“The paper is not trying to take on the Racing Post like the Sportsman - we are interested primarily in the betting side of racing,” Mullen is quoted as saying by the Guardian. “There's still a huge appetite for papers, especially in racing. The audience we are looking at is more a betting shop audience.”

The paper is linked to the independent monthly magazine Racing Ahead, which Mullen launched in 2004. It will compete with the Racing Post, which is currently being sold by Trinity Mirror. Racing Ahead Weekend will cost £1, 50 pence less than the Post.

The Guardian reported the niche weekly is setting its sights on sales between 20,000 and 30,000 copies. National distribution will be handled by Express Newspapers.

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Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-26 06:44

The Miami Herald and its Spanish-language sibling El Nuevo Herald have launched subscription digital editions, their parent Miami Herald Media Co. announced Friday.

Users can read the day's paper in standard online text mode or newspaper mode, which is shown exactly as it is laid out in print. Navigational tools organise sections by topic and allow readers to pull out interesting headlines and then jump directly to articles they wish to read.

An archive database enables viewers to access issues within the previous seven days.

Miami Herald Media Co. said the sites of the two papers reach 360,000 local users, with an extra 1 million out-of-market users, Editor & Publisher reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2007-09-26 06:42

Aiming to reach new readers and give advertisers more audience reach, Metro's Scotland edition has extended its distribution to Dundee.

Currently distributed in Glasgow, Edinburgh and the commuter corridor running between them, Metro will also be distributed at strategic locations throughout Dundee, such as railway stations and bus stops, HoldtheFrontPage.co.uk reported Tuesday.

“The extension into Dundee allows us to continue to tap into an affluent, young, urbanite demographic, enhancing our offering to advertisers and deepening our presence in the local markets,” Mark Hollinshead, managing director of the Scottish Daily Record and Sunday Mail, told HoldtheFrontPage.co.uk.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2007-09-26 06:41


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