Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


WikiLeaks

Do newspapers speak to your condition? If so, you might be interested in a print edition of the Lancashire Evening Post that plays audio. Developed as part of a research project by the University of Central Lancashire, "Interactive Newsprint" will be demostrated at the London Design Festival next week, Journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall reports

“A new study has suggested that the most read newspaper in the UK - the Sun - is also the least trusted,” writes Andrew Pugh for Press Gazette. In the least read and most trusted category? The Independent, the Guardian, and the Financial Times.

Press Gazette also reports that Archant has launched a new 68-page glossy magazine called Fulham Resident that is being distributed to 13,500 homes.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-13 16:30

The lawyer representing Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old US soldier accused of having leaked a massive trove of classified documents to WikiLeaks, has said that his trial is being endangered by the US government’s lack of transparency and by failures on the part of the prosecution.

The Courthouse News Service reported yesterday that Manning’s attorney David Coombs has condemned "a cataclysmic failing of the government to understand all aspects of the discovery process."

According to the article, Coombs has complained of the prosecution first refusing to share certain evidence with the defence on the grounds that it was classified, only to reverse its statements within a matter of days. Coombs has also implied that government prosecutors have made mistakes with the legal process, and have failed demonstrated full knowledge of their legal obligations.

The Courthouse News Service reports that in Coomb’s memo “nearly every line of text quoting a government memo or email has been blacked out in redactions”. The article points out that the information that has been withheld reflects “the intense secrecy surrounding the case”.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 09:51

WikiLeaks' latest leak, which is calls 'The Global Intelligence Files' is not as yet particularly interesting because of the content of the files, but because of the fact that WikiLeaks is back, and because of the partnerships that the episode reveals.

WikiLeaks claims to have created an online database of more than five million emails from Stratfor, a global intelligence company based in Austin, Texas, sent between July 2004 and December 2011. Stratfor provides its subscribers with geopolitical analysis via emails and explains on its site how it differentiates itself from news organisations.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-28 18:42

"Everybody is a journalist now".

This phrase has been repeated so many times that it's become a cliché, but that's not to say that a consensus has been reached about what it really means for the news industry. How should news organisations approach material from citizen journalists? Should lines be drawn between professional and citizen media? How can the work of citizen journalists be effectively verified?

These were some of the questions raised at the session titled "Professional and "Citizen" Journalism Working Together after WikiLeaks" at the UNESCO conference on The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World, where several panellists suggested that collaboration between citizen and professional reporters was best model.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 10:23

Legal experts and human rights advocates have raised questions about the state of international laws protecting journalists and their sources in the wake of the News of the World phone hacking scandal and the fallout from WikiLeaks publication of classified documents

Speaking at the UNESCO conference The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World, Jane Kirtley, director at the University of Minnesota School of Journalism, stated that she was "very nervous" about a number of cases in the United States, which she saw as laying a ground work for greater limits being placed on freedom.

Among the factors that caused her concern were the lack of a federal shield law to protect journalistic sources in the United States, and the recent seizure of the Mega Uploads domain name, despite the fact that it was outside of US jurisdiction.

Agnès Callamard, executive director of Article 19, likewise criticised the US government's reaction to the embassy cable leaks, calling some of the initial reactions reminiscent of the "McCarthy era".

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-16 18:11

The U.S. government and others will use the latest WikiLeaks release "as reason for secrecy for many years to come," believes Kathleen Carroll, executive editor of the Associated Press. It may take some time for the situation to change, but governments will try to plug what leaks they can and "lock things down," she said. She was speaking at the Nieman Lab event "From Watergate to Wikileaks: Secrecy and Journalism in the New Media Age."

All governments want to keep secrets from the public, she said, sometimes for the right reasons, but sometimes not. "Governments too often stretch the national security rationale well beyond reason," she continued, and there is a lot of information that is 'classified' that has little reason to be so. She pointed out that the US government spends $9 billion a year on keeping information secret. The U.S. is far from being alone in this practice, Carroll said: and threats against journalists for reporting on what the government wants to keep secret is "an all too familiar sad story in too many countries."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-17 15:29

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