Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Washington Post Co.

The Washington Post Co. is entering the "integrated marketing" space with the launch of SocialCode, which it bills as a full-service branding agency. But unlike the recent efforts by rival newspaper publishers such as Gannett and Tribune to create standalone marketing units that are a step away from the main content product, WaPo's effort is strikingly niche: SocialCode, housed within the Slate group, is devoted solely to helping marketers advertise themselves on Facebook.

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Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-20 17:42

The Washington Post has no plans, for now, to install a paywall but is following closely the subscription models that its rivals are implementing, MediaPost.com revealed on Monday.

"On pay models, obviously what The New York Times is doing is of interest to us," said CEO of Washington Post Co. Donald Graham during the UBS 38th Annual Global Media and Communications Conference, Agence France Press reported.

The New York Times is expected to start charging for some of its content on January 2011. Visitors will be able to access certain number of articles for free, after which they will have to pay a fee. According to media reports, those who subscribe to the print edition will have free access.

"We're not going to be pioneers on those experiments, but we'll be watching everyone ... we're quite willing to be followers on this front," Graham said. If paywalls prove to be successful revenue streams, WaPo might implement them.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-07 15:05

The Washington Post is to partner with Intersect.com, a new site that displays stories on timelines, to crowdsource Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert's "Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear," which will take place on the National Mall in advance of Tuesday's U.S. midterm elections.

In its Story Lab blog, the Washington Post invites its readers to join in as it looks for both on-the-ground answers from observers and rally participants, and opinions on whether the rally is just a marketing stunt or something that will really have a political impact. Those interested are asked to visit Intersect.com and create an account using "Washingtonpost" as an invite code. The paper will take and use content that has been contributed via Intersect for its own feed.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-28 17:48

The Washington Post Co. reported its second-quarter net income up to $91.9 million, from $12.2 million year-over-year. Continuing-operations income totaled $94.2 million, up from $21.2 million in the same period in 2009, Media Bistro reported.

The company added that its biggest business, the Kaplan test-prep and education services segment, could be hurt by the proposed rule changes at the U.S. Department of Education.

According to the rules, a university or college program would need to show its degree can lead to gainful employment in a recognised occupation in order to be eligible for government-sponsored student loans, Martket Watch reported.

The changes could "adversely affect" Kaplan's ability to retain admissions, financial aid advisors and students," according to a company statement.

However, it "cannot currently predict with reasonable accuracy the impact the proposed regulation will have on its program offerings if it (the proposed regulation) were enacted in its current form," the statement added.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-06 22:05

The Washington Post Co.-owned Newsweek has received bids and interest from several companies and individuals, including Newsmax Media, private equity fund OpenGate Capital, Ritchie Capital Management CEO Thane Ritchie (bidding on his own behalf), Sidney Harman (the owner of a stereo equipment company) and possibly even Newsweek's own editor, The New York Times reported.

Founded by former New York Post reporter Christopher Ruddy, Newsmax Media publishes a politically conservative-leaning magazine and Web site, and confirmed its bid yesterday. He said the bid to buy Newsweek is an effort to "diversify and expand into numerous distinct media brand offerings," and the company would not put its political views on Newsweek. OpenGate managing partner Andrew Nikou told Bloomberg that the firm has submitted a bid. OpenGate also owns TV Guide.

Meanwhile, Ritchie has also submitted a bid; last year he was unsuccessfully in buying the Sun Times Media Group. Harman, age 91 and founder of Harman Kardon stereo company, is interested in a possible bid. There has also been talk that Newsweek editor John Meacham is rallying bidders.

Meacham told Bloomberg yesterday he is continuing to consider options, but would not comment on a deadline.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-03 21:18

The Washington Post Company has added a new collection of sites on its political blog network focused on state politics, MediaWeek reported.

Following the recent launch of PostPolitics.com, the newspaper publisher has partnered with 10, among the 50 state-centric independent blogs, chosen by its readers.
The idea of going state-focused originated a year ago when Chris Cillizza, author of the news site's 'The Fix Blog', requested readers to recommend top local blogs focused on state politics, and recently unveiled a "best of" list that comprised of 50 states.

The company plans to highlight top stories from blogs such as the Alabama-based Doc's Political Parlor or The Iowa Republican on a daily basis, and individual bloggers will be contacted to provide in-depth coverage and analysis on the highlighted ones for PostPolitics.com, MediaWeek reported.

As SFN reported earlier this month, a local blogger has recently spoken out against the Post's blog network, because bloggers are unpaid.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-13 20:10

The Washington Post Co. on Friday announced its first-quarter profit of US$45.4 million, compared to a loss of $19.2 million in the same period last year, due to the slowdown of the print advertising slump and gains on cable TV and education businesses, mediabistro reported.

The magazine and newspaper businesses, however, did not perform well.

The magazine unit, now mainly made up of Newsweek, was down to $2 million from more than $20 million one year ago. Its newspaper division lost $13.8 million. Its revenue dropped 3 percent year over year to $155.8 million.

Most part of the revenue increase, or 11 percent for the company as a whole, were contributed by Kaplan and its television businesses, not publishing. The company now plans to reduce its traditional role as a publisher even further, according to the Associated Press article posted on Google.

It announced Wednesday to put Newsweek magazine, which has been its asset since 1961, up for sale.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-07 17:21

The Washington Post Co. announced today it will sell Newsweek, which it purchased in 1961. The company is going public with the news in order to engage as many potential buyers as possible, said the company's chairman, Donald E. Graham.

"We have reported losses in the tens of millions for the last two years," Graham said in a staff meeting this morning, according to Newsweek. "Outstanding work by Newsweek's people has significantly narrowed the losses in the last year and particularly in the last few months. But we do not see a path to continuing profitability under our management."

He said the company's goal is a "rapid sale to a qualified buyer." However, when negotiating a deal, the company will also consider the news magazine's future and the future of its employees.

Graham said the company expects Newsweek to continue losing money in 2010, but due to the current economy, it "might be a better fit elsewhere." Last year, Newsweek lost US$28 million; however, when it was redesigned and relaunched last year, it was originally believed that it had about three years to figure out how to break even, according to the New York Observer.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-06 00:21

The Washington Post Company owned-Newsweek.com is joining the increasing number of news publishers experimenting with cloud computing. The weekly magazine is outsourcing its Web site hosting duties to Amazon, MediaWeek reported.

Having incurred US$29.3 million operating losses in 2009, the move of shifting its hosting operations to an external host is aimed at cutting loses in its magazine division, thereby hoping to save approximately $500,000 annually.
"It saves Newsweek money," Geoff Reiss, vice-president and general manager of Newsweek Digital, told MediaWeek. "Lots of people out there built their own infrastructure and are going to be tortured by this idea of sunk costs."

Newsweek.com also underwent a redesign this week, moving to a more simple, stripped-down look, while avoiding standard media site design features like large ad units and branding statements.

"A clean, vertical orientation on the page was one of the goals. What we've seen come out of social media and blogs [is] an organization that makes sense for how people are consuming media now...brand doesn't trump user experience," Reiss told MediaWeek.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 21:33

The Washington Post announced yesterday it will launch a new business weekly April 19 called Capital Business, which will be sold by subscription on a weekly basis, the Washington Business Journal reported. To promote the title, subscribers who receive the newspapers each day will receive four complimentary issues.

The weekly will focus on trends and ideas shaping the business community, as well as the area's largest industries, such as government contracting, technology, finance, commercial real estate, national associations and the legal community, according to the press release posted by MarketWatch.

The weekly will be published on Mondays, and subscribers can also read the Capital Business online on the Post's Web site.

"Capital Business is intended to help the business community navigate the region's dynamic economy at a time of great change and opportunity," Dan Beyers, the publication's editor, stated in the press release. "This publication is going to be more than just a collection of company profiles and business data - we plan to deliver the high quality news and analysis readers have come to expect from The Post."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-17 04:29

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