Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Washington Post

Next Issue has come to the king of touch screens, and the excitement is palpable. Time is calling the magazine bundling app the Hulu for magazines, and TechCrunchhas tentatively likened it to Netflix (the American movie-mailing service that has given the DVD a renaissance, for those without zip codes). This joint venture between Condé NastTime IncHearstMeredith and News Corp is “probably the easiest and most economical way for you to read your favourite titles” on your iPad according to Anthony Ha. Is it a good enough deal that consumers will pay for the content? PaidContent takes a look.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-10 16:35

By Brian Veseling

On 8 February, the same day that The Washington Post announced its fifth round of newsroom buyouts in the past several years, the Forbes website posted a long profile of Washington Post Chairman and CEO Donald E. Graham by Jeff Bercovici titled "Nice Guy, Finishing Last: How Don Graham Fumbled the Washington Post Co." that highlights a number of challenges and setbacks the company has suffered in recent years.

Among these are missed opportunities with Facebook and Politico, as well as major losses sustained from Newsweek (reportedly $40 million in the two years before the company sold it) and recent problems relating to its Kaplan education unit.

As all of these areas have suffered, so has the company's best known product, its namesake newspaper, which has seen circulation fall by 40% since 1995 (to just over 500,000).

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-10 11:50

The Washington Post announced last Friday that it was launching campaignreads.com, a new section of its site "completely powered by our readers" where it shares a curated selection of Tweets with links to coverage of the US presidential election.

Post Politics wrote that, for the past few weeks, it had been asking readers to share links to their favourite election coverage by tweeting @PostPolitics or with the hashtag #campaignreads. The Post's political team now curates these Tweets using Storify, and publishes them on its new page.

The initiative has potential benefits for Post journalists and their readers. Firstly it helps the Post "filter the deluge of campaign coverage" by asking its users for selection of the articles they enjoyed the most. Secondly it gives readers prominence by crediting them on the campaignreads.com if the Post uses articles that they've shared.

So far, the new section does not seem to be receiving a deluge of Tweets; as of 2.30pm (GMT +1) on Monday 30th January, the last link that had been shared was from Thursday 26th January. What's more, a Twitter search for #campaignreads doesn't bring up a huge return.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-30 14:58

The Washington Post has no plans, for now, to install a paywall but is following closely the subscription models that its rivals are implementing, MediaPost.com revealed on Monday.

"On pay models, obviously what The New York Times is doing is of interest to us," said CEO of Washington Post Co. Donald Graham during the UBS 38th Annual Global Media and Communications Conference, Agence France Press reported.

The New York Times is expected to start charging for some of its content on January 2011. Visitors will be able to access certain number of articles for free, after which they will have to pay a fee. According to media reports, those who subscribe to the print edition will have free access.

"We're not going to be pioneers on those experiments, but we'll be watching everyone ... we're quite willing to be followers on this front," Graham said. If paywalls prove to be successful revenue streams, WaPo might implement them.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-07 15:05

The Washington Post and Yahoo News have collaborated to launch "The Fast Fix," a daily video feature starring Chris Cillizza, managing editor of PostPolitics.com and author of the Post's blog The Fix, according to the UpshotBlog on Yahoo News. The video feature will offer analysis on the day's political news in 60 seconds.

While bringing together reader submissions, social media, and Cillizza's own intellectual curiosity to provide better analysis and insights on politics, the co-produced and co-branded video feature will offer nonpartisan political commentary covering the "so what?" and the "now what?" through fast, visually active analysis of both over-reported issues and important but under-reported political topics, according to the press release posted on MarketWatch.com.

Image: MediaBistro.com

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-30 20:13

The Washington Post will run a two-inch strip across the bottom of its front-page on Sunday, the UpshotNewsBlog on Yahoo reported yesterday.

For the very first time, the newspaper ran a cover-wrap ad campaign for Capital One on its Sept. 5 print edition, which gave information about the conversion of Chevy Chase Bank to Capital One, Edito & Publisher reported today.

Image: UpshotBlog on Yahoo! News

With a sharp decline in advertising revenues observed by all major print publications in recent times, many leading newspapers are embracing the front-page display ad as a creative route to maximise ad revenues, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-14 22:08

The Washington Post plans to launch its iPad app "in the coming weeks," following The New York Times' and Wall Street Journal's efforts on the Apple device, The Upshot reported.

"Mobile continues to be a key distribution platform for our content, utility for our readers, and, a core enabler of our growing digital business," Ken Babby, chief revenue officer and general manager for Washington Post Digital stated in a staff e-mail Wednesday.

Photo: AP/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

"The usage of the Post's iPhone app continues to accelerate," Babby added. He also announced the new mobile leadership team, including former AOL executive Beth Jacobs as general manager for mobile, as well as the Post's Neil Quinn as director for mobile commercial products.

There is no firm date yet on the iPad app release but it's expected some time in the fall, according to a Post spokeswoman, The Upshot reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-02 18:08

The Washington Post and Bloomberg have launched a co-branded business page, eight months after announcing the site was in the works, paidContent reported yesterday.

Content is from both outlets and wire services, such as The Associated Press, and the site is now The Post's business page. Articles written by Washington Post staffers gives their names on the main page, while Bloomberg articles show only "Bloomberg," as the content creator, not the individual reporter. The Bloomberg reporter's name is given after the user clicks on the headline.

The new page "combines The Post's in-depth expertise on economic policy with Bloomberg's leadership in business news and information to provide the essential online source for business and policy," a notice posted on the new site told readers yesterday.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-15 19:14

The Washington Post is creating a "local blogging network," in which the newspaper will link to selected blogs from its Web site, Adam Pagnucco of Maryland Politics Watch wrote last week. As part of the network, the Post would ask bloggers to submit original content, which would be edited by Post editors. The Post would also have rights to that content through a written agreement, and expect that bloggers participate in a blogger "discussion" each week and stick to a "workflow" plan.

The only problem with the set-up is that the Post wouldn't actually pay the bloggers, he stated.

Pugnacco wrote in the Maryland Politics Watch blog: "Five weeks ago, I received an unsolicited offer from the Washington Post. They asked if they could post my picture and biography on their Web site and link to every new blog post appearing here if I agreed to produce regular original content for them at their request. I turned them down. Why? Because they wanted me to work for them for nothing."

Using Google subscriber counts, Pugnacco estimates that "MPW's rag-tag band of volunteers, guests and rogues has slightly more regular online subscribers than the Post's entire paid staff of Maryland reporters combined. Remind me again why WE should be working for the Post for free?"

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-03 23:03

The Washington Post may be looking into providing readers with more news and information on local business. A source told the Washington City Paper that the Post is planning to launch a business publication called Capital Business, which would be issued weekly and cost US$1.99 per week.

This comes less than a year after the Post shuttered its daily business section to "save on newsprint - an important objective in these times." However, the Business Insider pointed out today that the prototype sent out to subscribers for their input is in print, not online.

Why? A focus on a target audience is a good way to sell "advertiser-friendly business coverage for niche, monied audiences," even when the ad market isn't doing so well, according to the Business Insider.

Along with the prototype, the Post sent out a survey to some subscribers, aiming to better understand their business interests, as well as asking for opinions and suggestions. The online poll to get subscribers input requests they take a closer look the prototype of Capital Business, stating "Please take a few minutes to look through the publication and focus your attention on the look, feel and types of stories within it, and less on the individual articles. Also, we ask that you disregard that the information within is old and out of date."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-26 23:24

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