Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


United States

Ad revenue falling, print circulation down, newsroom cuts, no new business model in sight… It’s not uncommon to read reports about the dire situation that the US newspaper industry finds itself in. But are things really as bad as all that? As the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism publishes its annual report today on the state of American media, we have a chance to step back and look in greater details at how the US newspapers handled their search for a new business digital business model over the course of the last year.

There’s no denying that the figures make grim reading, particularly when it comes to newspapers’ advertising revenue. Pew references Newspaper Association of America statistics, which estimate that online ad spend at papers grew by $207 million, but print ad spend fell by $2.1 billion, meaning that for print losses at US papers were ten times greater than digital gains.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-19 15:11

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp bought on Monday 90 percent of Wireless Generation, a U.S. company that develops mobile and Internet educational software for teachers, Bloomberg revealed. The media group paid US$360 million in cash for the acquisition.

"We see a $500bn sector in the U.S. alone that is waiting desperately to be transformed by big breakthroughs that extend the reach of great teaching," said Murdoch, The Telegraph quoted.

According to the Financial Times, the deal will allow News Corp compete other media groups that have invested in software and education services like Pearson, which owns the FT Group.

This is the first time in almost 20 years that News Corp, which owns The Wall Street Journal and The New York Post, will "foray into the for-profit world of education since its book publishing arm, Harper Collins, got out of the textbook business in the mid-1990s," The New York Times reminded.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-25 16:48

As publishers continue to look for new revenue streams, 27 percent of American and Canadian publishers "expect mobile to significantly impact their revenue in just two years," according to an online survey conducted by the Audit Bureau of Circulations, Poynter.org reported today.

Twenty-eight percent said they believe sponsorships will bring advertising revenue, followed by search (22 percent), video (21 percent), banner ads (19 percent) and pop-ups (19 percent), paidContent.org revealed. But publishers said they would not rely only on advertisements and plan to charge subscription fees to the applications.

"Many magazines and newspapers are already implementing their plans and tweaking their offerings while others are following close behind," ABC president and managing director Michael Lavery stated in a press release.

Although 78 percent of those surveyed disagree with the idea that print publications will eliminate their print issues, 63 percent said e-readers "would become vital distribution channels for their publication." For instance, 60 percent of newspapers publishers plan to develop an iPad application in the next six to twelve months.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-04 20:45

Although two thirds of Americans prefer to get their news from newspapers and TV, 55 percent believe that traditional media "will not longer exist in ten years," according to a Harris poll conducted for 24/7 Wall St. website, Editor & Publisher revealed on Friday.

However, 81 percent said there "will always be" a need for print newspapers despite the decline of traditional print outlets. Yet, 46 percent get their news from local TV networks while only 31 percent turns their attention towards local dailies, the survey showed.

Photo: Getty Images via The Independent

Twenty-five percent of Americans acknowledged that they are spending less time reading newspapers and magazines, "while in comparison 28 per cent said the time they spend visiting online news sites has increased," Journalism.co.uk reported. Overall, 50 percent get "almost all" their news from the Internet.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-01 14:04

Politico will launch early next year Politico Pro, a subscription news service focused on energy, technology and health care coverage, The New York Times reported yesterday. The service will cost between US$1,495 and $2,500 a year for the first topic, and $1,000 for every additional topic.

"There is a perception that this market is overserved, when we actually think it's underserved," executive editor of Politico Jim VandeHei said. "The idea is that we want to find multiple revenue streams so we can grow even bigger."

Since 2006, Politico has offered free content on its website and has distributed free copies of its print edition in Washington, The New York Observer pointed out. Its main source of revenue is advocacy advertising in its newspaper.

More recently, other media companies have expanded their Washington coverage. Two weeks ago, Bloomberg announced the launch of a news subscription service that will focus on the U.S. federal government. Yesterday, the National Journal relaunched its website offering more daily content and special features, The New York Observer reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-26 16:25

U.S. News Media Group, which publishes the monthly U.S. News and World Report, is launching a series of real-time news feeds in collaboration with content aggregator Loud3r, paidContent.org reported today.

Using Loud3r's online search technology, the news group aims to complement its original reporting with relevant content on a myriad issues from around the Web for its readers, according to the press release published on ITNewsOnline.com. This new content channel will give editors the tools to discover and curate fresh, relevant content

"Users' expectation in the Internet age is for breadth and depth, and the traditional news organ needs to apply technology to get there because there are some tasks that are impossible for a human staff to cover," Lowell Goss, CEO at Loud3r, told paidContent. "The world expects every possible article that there might be on a particular news item."

For example, using Congress Tracker, its first real time news feed on top political issues, featuring updated profiles of all 435 members of Congress, the channel will serve as a template for all future content channels of the group, according to paidContent. Goss further added: "Aggregation doesn't only free up the newsroom, it can serve as inspiration for reporters and editors."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-10 22:11

The American Audit Bureau of Circulations announced yesterday it will launch an auditing report for mobile content providers, Editor & Publisher revealed.

The service, named m.Audit Report, will provide monthly statistics about number of app downloads, page views, unique visitors, audience access points, type of mobiles used by readers and visits per day to each mobile content site, the Bureau explained on its NewsBulletin Blog.

Photo Source: The New York Times via Johnny Holland Magazine

ABC's senior vice president of communications and strategic planning Neal Lulofs said the new report is aimed to help publishers "demonstrate the reach of their product to advertisers," Journalism.co.uk quoted.

However, the ABC noted on its website that members can still report the results of their mobile audits with their multimedia publishers statements or on consolidated media reports.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-26 22:08

Americans' confidence in newspapers remains low, as only a quarter of the population says it trusts the press, a Gallup poll revealed on Friday.

Yet the greatest confidence (49 percent) comes from people between 18 and 29 years old, "the same demographic often blamed for the precipitous decline in U.S. dailies' subscription rates," Agence France Press pointed out. Nonetheless, the newspaper industry is not the only media field experiencing low confidence. According to the poll, 78 percent distrust television news.

The survey, which annually measures confidence in 16 U.S. institutions, found that trust declines as Americans get older, hitting its lowest level in the group between 30 and 49 years, with a 16 percent of confidence. Gallup explained this tendency by saying that young people place more trust in institutions in general, AFP noted. Trust in media, which has been declining since 2003, is now similar to the one Americans have in banks (23 percent) and much better than Congress (11 percent).

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-16 16:06

The (Colorado Springs, United States) Gazette shed 11 more workers Friday, the Denver Post reported today. This round of layoffs, which hit the newsroom hardest with seven from editorial positions, brings the total staff of the Colorado daily under 300.

The Gazette is owned by Freedom Communications Inc., based in Irvine, Calif., according to 5280 Magazine. Freedom filed for bankruptcy protection from its creditors in September, as 5280 then reported.

Weekday subscriptions from April through September at The Gazette were down 7.8 percent as compared to the same period last year, The Gazette Friday reported.

Tellingly, The Gazette is one of 13 major U.S. newspapers not seeking credentials for engaging in live coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics set for Vancouver, Canada, Sports Business Journal yesterday reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 16:07

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