Date

Fri - 17.11.2017


union

The UK’s National Union of Journalists is facing a “severe financial crisis,” according to a memo, written last month by the union’s general secretary Michelle Stanistreet.

In the memo, Stanistreet outlined the cuts that would be necessary in order to get the union back on track financially, including a £400,000 reduction in payroll costs and nine staff being made redundant. However, Press Gazette reports today that the union is now facing a “grassroots revolt” from members who don’t want to see the cuts go through.

According to the Stanistreet’s memo, the NUJ is suffering from a drop in subscription income, a crisis with its pension scheme, pressure on its members from the problems facing the journalism industry, and a reduction in assets and reserve cash as a result of “successive deficits.” “This combination of factors mean we have to take action,” writes Stanistreet, “sitting back and doing nothing is not an option.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-06 18:04

The former president of the Boston Newspaper Guild was impeached in absentia for misfeasance when he signed unauthorized checks as well as using a credit card for personal expenses, Editor & Publisher Thursday reported.
Daniel Totten, in office since 2005, was found guilty by a five-member panel in the internal proceeding. The organization, which represents 600 members, has been engaged over the last few years in protracted negotiations with the management of The Boston Globe, which is presently owned by New York Times Co., The Boston Herald reported Thursday. It was not immediately apparent whether civil or criminal charges would follow.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 21:49

Today is shaping up to be a crucial day for Sun-Times Media Group Inc. (STMG), the Chicago Tribune observed Sunday.

By 5 p.m., the STMG and its unions will know whether other buyers have emerged to challenge Chicago financier Jim Tyree's US$26.5 million offer for the Chicago Sun-Times and more than 50 suburban newspapers, paidContent also reported.

Despite rumors that Tribune Co. (which owns Sun-Times rival the Chicago Tribune) might launch a surprise bid for Sun-Times Media's assets, sources say that isn't likely to happen, PoynterOnline reported Sunday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-05 16:56

A Boston Globe union boss has had his financial privileges with the Boston Newspaper Guild suspended pending a probe into his possible violation of financial rules, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

The executive board, which announced the suspension to members via letter on Thursday, would not specify the misfeasance of which Daniel Totten, president of the Boston Globe's largest union, stood accused.

Reached by The AP, Totten said it was an ''internal matter'' and declined further comment.

In an e-mail to members, Trotten denied wrongdoing and said the probe centres on the "simple matter" of the countersignature on his own pay check. "There are those who are engaging in a political vendetta as a result of the hard feelings that remain in our Union following our contentious contract negotiation," he wrote, according to a report by the Globe.

Following a threat by the Globe's parent company, The New York Times Co., to close the newspaper, the Guild approved a contract in July that called for an 8.3 percent wage cut and other measures to save the newspaper $10 million a year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-25 17:05

While the Sun-Times Media Group has received an offer for its purchase, before the sale may be finalised it must have the approval of the company's unions, which face significant contract concessions, the Chicago Tribune reported Thursday.

Union representatives are shocked at the cost reductions they are being asked to make, which is a prerequisite for the sale of the bankrupt U.S. publisher.

"This basically guts our contract. It's a terrible, terrible thing," Tom Thibeault, executive director of the Chicago Newspaper Guild, told the Tribune. "I do not anticipate our members supporting this."

The concessions as part of a new three-year contract, which includes a reduction of the severance pay out from 50 weeks of wages to just four, the right of management to transfer and reassign employees without consulting unions and the elimination of seniority rules when making staff reductions.

Staff fear making such concessions to allow the company to keep operating will then see them without a job, according to the Tribune.

A private investment group led by Chicago banker Jim Tyree was announced as a potential purchaser on Monday.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-11 19:09

The Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia announced in a memo to its members on Monday that it has rejected an appeal by the city's two major newspapers, The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, to extend the union contracts beyond the August 31 termination.

The memo, posted by Editor & Publisher on Monday morning, from Administrative Officer Bill Ross and President Dan Gross of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia, revealed the rejection of last week's extension request by Philadelphia Media Holdings, as they attempt to complete a bankruptcy reorganisation plan.

The union stressed it has been open for discussions since February when the last contract negotiations were concluded, and denies the publisher needs more time.

"After extensive discussion and consultation with our legal counsel, the Executive Board informed the company that we believe its request is premature because there have not been any contract negotiations to date despite our repeated offers, since February, to begin bargaining," the memo states. "Both the company's request to extend, and its failure to begin bargaining leads us to suspect that the company is unwilling to publicly disclose its bargaining position at the present time. We have been informed that top management will seek substantial contract concessions."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-11 16:00

Georgina Harvey, the managing director of the UK's Trinity Mirror has criticised the National Union of Journalist's plans to hold a one-day strike, calling it a "reckless and negligent decision," Press Gazette reported.

The NUJ's strike plans concern several regional editions of the paper in the Midlands region. The strike will protest the paper's announced closure of nine titles and the cutting of 120 positions.

Harvey suggested the decision to strike was not made by the majority of unionised journalists, saying that "it is highly frustrating that the majority of our journalists should be held to ransom like this when only 27 percent of our entire editorial workforce across the Midlands businesses voted for this action."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-24 12:44

Canada's Globe & Mail employees voted in favour of a labour contract that includes a two-year pay freeze Reuters reported.

Under the new contracts, workers will receive a 2 percent raise in the third year of their employment followed by 2.5 percent increases in the fourth and fifth year of the contract.

The agreement struck between the newspaper and the worker's union will retain the benefit pension plan, while requiring employees to take part in a "defined contribution retirement plan". The pay cuts and modified contracts follow an announcement by the Globe in January that it would eliminate 80 jobs.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-08 16:05

The Times Union has reported that publisher Hearst Corp.'s mission to cut operating costs by 20 percent will see up to 45 job lost at the newspaper, the Daily Gazette reported on Friday. Albany Newspaper Guild President Tim O'Brien said the union would take court action over any layoffs.

"We believe that legally we will have a strong case if they go forward," he said.

In a replica of recent events at the Boston Globe, Publisher George Hearst declared the Guild's rejection of the company's contract offer on Monday an impasse.

"We made our best and final offer. We have to move forward now and try to make smart decisions on how to lean-up the cost of the business," Hearst said.

Job cuts would affect both union and nonunion staff and would include editorial and advertising employees, he said.

O'Brien expressed concern for the newspaper senior employees who represent a large portion of the pay roll and are close to retirement.

"If someone is close to but not yet 55, they could lose half of their pension if they are laid off now," he said.

Hearst said that those who would be considered for redundancy would be evaluated individually based on production and without prejudice.

"We are going to have to make tough decisions. We will be looking at level of performance," Hearst said.

"The company is not targeting employees relative to age, race, or ethnicity. We will be selecting wisely based on the needs of the business and the skills and capacity of the employee."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-19 18:49

The Boston Globe's largest union, the Boston Newspaper Guild, plans to hold meetings with officials from the Boston Globe and the National Labor Relations Board in hopes of stifling the 23 percent pay cuts proposed by the New York Times Co. the Boston Herald reported.

The pay cuts follow the union's rejection of a plan which included $10 million worth of wage and benefit concessions. Times Co. has said it needs to find a way to make concessions which would yield $20 million in savings in order to keep the Boston paper open.

Amidst the projected cutbacks, the Guild filed an unfair labor complaint which the National Labor Relations Board is expected to consider this week. The union has also appealed to the Boston Globe's managers, asking them to do away with sweeping plans to reduce wages.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-15 15:00

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