Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


Twitter

USA Today reports that Twitter might start making a profit from advertising. "Promoted Tweets" may appear on some Twitter.com search results, according to co-founder Biz Stone. The move already has followers: Best Buy, Bravo, Red Bull, Sony Pictures, Starbucks and Virgin America.

Responses to the business model were two-fold, the Guardian pointed out. Some felt that the site needed to make revenue "inevitably", while others doubt its success. ReadWriteWeb described it as "non-invasive," "nothing too crazy," "nothing terribly exploitive," "entirely predictable" and that it had "no banner ads" or "sales of data to direct marketers."

Later on this year, Twitter will be including ads in users feeds, ads that will be "relevant," the Los Angeles times reported. Promoted Tweets will offer relevant information whereas those that "don't resonate" with users will be removed, Stone said. Advertisers will be charged according to a cost-per-thousand system.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-13 18:35

Paper.li has introduced a simple Web application that can help turn Twitter streams into a daily online newspaper, to provide users with a daily summary of their Twitter streams and allow them to customise their daily read with topics of interest, TheNextWeb.com's Jeff Bajayo reported today.

This application helps find other newspapers by topic, share the Twitter newspaper via the retweet feature, keeps followers informed about your interests, and explores the Twitter field in a new way.

The content populating mechanism of Paper.li is different from the popular feedly plugin, which pulls content from the sites added. With similarities coexisting in the form of a magazine-like page being created by both applications, this tool aggregates the most interesting articles of the day onto your newspaper, by presumably calculating the number of retweets, according Bajayo.

"The design isn't too shabby or cheap," he opined, and gave the example of his paper, created using the app. Users will be notified via e-mail about the availability of their newspaper and others' newspapers as well.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-12 22:49

Mobile social networking is growing rapidly. As of January, 17.1 percent of mobile subscribers in he United States accessed a social networking site or blog, compared to 13.8 percent in October 2009, according to new data from comScore MobiLens.

Facebook and Twitter both have marked triple-digit traffic growth on the mobile Web last year, according to comScore's release last week. This made their U.S. audiences 25.1 million and 4.7 million in total, respectively.

MySpace's mobile traffic, however, has gone down 7 percent to 11.4 million, MediaPost reported.

In terms of mobile activities, social networking was the fastest-growing type over the last three months, while text messaging the most prevalent.

63.5 percent of mobile users texted in January, up from 62 percent in October 2009.

Mobile Web browsing came next with 28.6 percent doing soup from 26.8 percent in October, followed by game-playing, using downloaded apps, social networking as well as listening to music.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-12 22:40

Google last month took a page from Twitter's playbook, testing its trending topics concept and launching Google Buzz. Now it's Twitter's turn. All Things Digital's Peter Kafka reveals that Twitter's new ad platform looks a lot like Google's.

Although plans are still in the works, it is expected that ads will be linked to Twitter searches, and will also use Twitter's format. The micro-blogging service will work with ad buyers and agencies at first, with the aim to grow into the self-service model like Google, according to Kafka.

Sky News, meanwhile, reported that the ads will be delivered according to users' "feeds and needs." The search-related model is enabled by deep packet inspection, which scans searches for keywords, and then delivers keyword-related ads.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-03 00:23

Teens and young adults blog less today than they did in 2006, while older adults are blogging more than ever, according to a Pew Internet Project survey, out today. Teens are also not using Twitter in large numbers, with just 8 percent of Internet users ages 12-17 using the micro-blogging service.

Currently, 14 percent of online teens say they have a blog, while 28 percent said so in 2006. Comments on blogs are down too, with 76 percent of teen social network users saying they commented on friends' blogs in 2006. Today, that number is 52 percent. For adults, 24 percent of those ages 18 to 29 said they blogged in December 2007, while just 7 percent of those age 30 and older did so. By 2009, less users age 18 to 29 blogged - just 15 percent of Internet users - while 11 percent of those age 30 and older have a personal blog.

When it comes to Twitter, older teens are more likely to use it than younger teens - 5 percent of online teens age 12 to 13 use Twitter, while 10 percent of teens ages 14 to 17 do so. Of teens, high school girls are most likely to use Twitter, with 13 percent of those ages 14 to 17 doing so; meanwhile, just 7 percent of boys the same age use Twitter.

Mobile phone ownership and Internet use is "near ubiquitous among teens and young adults," according to the study. Wireless Internet is used most by young adults, and laptops are now chosen more than desktops for those under age 30.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-04 00:01

Social networking sites, especially Facebook and micro-blogging service Twitter, have seen enormous growth over the past few years, and news outlets are using the two to attract a wider audience, keep dedicated readers close and distribute stories to a wider audience.

The Austin American-Statesman, The New York Times and The Huffington Post are all experimenting with new ways to generate ad revenue using both social networking sites, and are discovering that benefits can be two-fold: news outlets gain new social networking audiences, while advertisers gain a new way to engage consumers, Poynter Online reported. Meanwhile, smaller businesses that have less advertising dollars to spend are able to reach consumers in a newer, more cost-effective way.

At The Austin American-Statesman, for example, advertisers can pay for tweets on two of the newspaper's Twitter accounts, @Austin360 and @Statesman. Two advertisers, a restaurant and haunted house, paid $300 each per day in autumn 2009, and were each given a 124-character tweets, one in the morning and one in the afternoon.

Most followers found the ads to be non-intrusive, said Robert Quigley, the newspaper's social media editor. This is likely because he stipulated that the adverts must be action-related, such as giving a special offer that benefits readers, as opposed to just an ad.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-02 23:33

Twitter has gained enormous popularity globally since its launch in 2006. According to Alexa, Twitter was ranked 29th in terms of Web traffic. A compete.com blog entry in February 2009 ranked it as the third most used social network, with about six million unique monthly visitors and 55 million monthly visits. However, only about four out of 10 users are retained, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Nielsen ranked Twitter as the fastest-growing site in the Member Communities category for February 2009, with a monthly growth of 1,382 percent, while Zimbio and Facebook followed with an increase of 240 percent and 228 percent, respectively.

According to eMarketer, in 2008, there were only six million Twitter users, or 3.8 percent of the U.S. online population, accessing the site via any platform on at least a monthly basis.

The number increased to 12.2 million, or 7.4 percent of all U.S. Internet users, in 2009, and will continue to rise to 18.1 million and 10.8 percent in 2010, eMarketer predicts.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-28 22:51

Social networking site memberships have skyrocketed in the past couple of years, and marketers are clear about the importance of reaching audiences through social media. A recent study has surveyed executives from companies on the Inc. 500 list and found that 79 percent of them view social media as being an important part of their marketing and business strategies, the Bakersfield Californian reported yesterday.

Executives also said social media is important to "generating hits, feedback, leads and sales," according to the report, "Social Media in the 2009 Inc. 500: New Tools & New Trends," by Dr. Nora Ganim Barnes and Eric Mattson of the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Another report, "The Social Media Marketing Book," advises executives that one of the major pitfalls they can avoid is using forum marketing services, which use many fake accounts to "create a false buzz on behalf of the business they are trying to promote," which only compromises a business's reputation, Slashdot reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-22 19:03

The average U.S. newspaper has around 18,000 Twitter followers and is tweeted 11 times per day, according to a study from Internet communications company the Bivings Group, the Boston Business Journal reported last week. The group's study focused on 300 Twitter accounts, including those of individual reporters from top 100 newspapers across the United States.

Analysis showed that The New York Times was the most retweeted paper, with more than 1.8 million followers, and had 1,500 retweets throughout September, according to Penn Olson. Taking away some outlets with over 100,000 followers puts the average at 3,447 followers per paper, eMarketer wrote. Tweet frequency varied from 1.1 (The Boston Globe's Big Picture and the Akron Beacon Journal) to 95.5 (The Boston Herald) messages per day, according to the Boston Business Journal.

All of the 100 publishers from the study used Twitter, but 40 percent did not link to the Twitter page from their sites. eMarketer stated that when links were added, they were hard to find. Fifty-six percent of the newspaper sites contained a directory of all the accounts related to the publication. The number of followers and retweets was not related, according to Penn Olson.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-01-04 17:12

Social networking has been around for years, but 2009 was the year they became useful journalism tools, from Twitter being used to inform the world about unrest in Iran to the rollout of Facebook Connect to make sharing news and information easier.

This was also the year "your uncle became a Facebook friend, and your company started Twittering," as Computer World put it. This autumn, Facebook users reached 350 million, and time spent on the site was up 700 percent, to 13.9 billion minutes spent on the site in April, according to Nielsen.

"Business has embraced both Twitter and Facebook as a way to communicate directly with customers and to inexpensively get their points across to a large number of folks. Much of the fear that business had of social networking seems to have abated as they become more comfortable with the concept and see the advantages. We're still at a point where only a small number of businesses have social networking strategies, but that number is increasing quickly over time," Dan Olds, an analyst with the Gabriel Consulting Group, told Computer World.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-23 21:11

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