Date

Thu - 25.05.2017


TV

“The change in the industry right now is the most dramatic I've ever seen... Virtually every paper in the country is, if not diving head first, at least dipping [its] toes into video,” said videographer Chuck Fadley to the American Journalism Review.

That was nearly four years ago; it is now safe to say they are doing canon balls.

The New York Times, which started including videos with digital news stories seven years ago, now produces approximately 120 videos per month, and streams two live shows to its website every business day. The Wall Street Journal, which began shooting video more than three years ago, now produces about 50 clips per day, as well as nine live shows from around the globe. Meanwhile, the U.S. edition of the Huffington Post has recently unveiled HuffPost Live, a plan to stream live video to its website for 12 hours five days a week beginning on August 13.

Logically enough, the news content is attracted by the prospect of advertising revenue.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-23 15:03

Russian publishing house Kommersant will launch a TV channel that may be available on cable or the Web, Lenta.ru reported today. The channel's website outlined that it will focus on socio-political news content and that stories will "strictly" include only the facts and expert opinions.

RBC Daily wrote that Kommersant General Director Andrei Galiev confirmed the project will soon come to life and that the firm is looking into the various steps that should be taken to realise Kommersant TV. According to experts, initial investment in the project would have to be between US$2 million to $5 million, while the yearly budget must amount to $2 million, rg.ru noted.

David Shostak, operating director of video-gaming and computer channel Gameland TV, said that Internet TV currently has no real business model and that Web-based outlets as such serve to promote the channel and to gain extra audiences, as opposed to cable-based ones, which is where real monetization occurs.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-01 13:47

The defined line between newspapers, radio and television has become blurred in the online sphere, as all types of news sources have their respective websites, putting all media domains in direct competition. Glenn Beck, for example, a conservative media icon for Fox News in the United States, just launched his "News and Opinion" website The Blaze. As more people get their news from television than newspapers, it will be interesting to see how TV icons fair in competition with newspapers' websites.

Glenn Beck is widely known for his racy commentary on his television show. He is expanding his media empire online after already dominating radio, TV, and book publishing reports the Financial Times. The Blaze was released online Monday after Beck's "Restoring Honor" rally in Washington. "Too many important stories are overlooked. And too many times we see mainstream media outlets distorting facts to fit rigid agendas," Glenn comments on his website.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-01 13:03

Although television continues to be advertising's most memorable form, 86 percent of UK viewers using a digital video recorder to watch time-shifted shows skip through the ads, research published yesterday by YouGov for Deloitte has found. Shorter breaks in advertising would lead to more ad-watching, 48 percent of respondents said, MediaGuardian reported.

Meanwhile, digital and personal TV video recorders has led to more television watching, the report found. The research was conducted for the MediaGuardian Edinburgh international television festival, which begins Friday.

Image: Mahmoud.M's flickr photostream
"Online advertising's poor showing relative to television may surprise, given that the former has often been portrayed as television's nemesis," said James Bates, media partner at Deloitte, according to Biz Report. "What television does best - display and brand building - is what online struggles with. Online advertising is best at search, which previously newspapers, particularly for classified, had excelled at."

Television ads are also more effective than online, the poll of 4,000 adults found, with about 50 percent saying TV ads stay in their minds the most, the BBC reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-25 19:19

In the United Kingdom, the average person spends 45 percent of their waking hours watching television, listening to the radio, or using mobile phones, computers or other gadgets, media regulator Ofcom has found in its first study to track how long consumers spend with various media. Increasing use of both smartphones and social networking sites are partly responsible for the high number, Telegraph.co.uk reported today.

For example, two years ago 5.7 million people said they accessed the Internet on their mobile phone, while 13.5 million people said so this year, Ofcom's annual Communications Market Report found. The most popular mobile site was Facebook, at 45 percent; Google came in with 8 percent.

Image: Micht Licht, NotionsCapital.com's flickr photostream

But consumers aren't spending all their time with new media and new digital devices. Traditional media, especially television, are still a "central part" of everyday life, the Telegraph explained. However, multitasking is also increasing, with a growing number of people saying that watch TV or listen to the radio while using the Internet.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-19 23:43

Americans' confidence in newspapers remains low, as only a quarter of the population says it trusts the press, a Gallup poll revealed on Friday.

Yet the greatest confidence (49 percent) comes from people between 18 and 29 years old, "the same demographic often blamed for the precipitous decline in U.S. dailies' subscription rates," Agence France Press pointed out. Nonetheless, the newspaper industry is not the only media field experiencing low confidence. According to the poll, 78 percent distrust television news.

The survey, which annually measures confidence in 16 U.S. institutions, found that trust declines as Americans get older, hitting its lowest level in the group between 30 and 49 years, with a 16 percent of confidence. Gallup explained this tendency by saying that young people place more trust in institutions in general, AFP noted. Trust in media, which has been declining since 2003, is now similar to the one Americans have in banks (23 percent) and much better than Congress (11 percent).

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-16 16:06

Beginning tomorrow, Al Jazeera English will launch on Freeview, effectively doubling its availability in UK homes, MediaGuardian reported today.

Al Jazeera English will be available to 10.2 million homes in United Kingdom that use Freeview for their main TV set and also for the 8.5 million homes that use Freeview as an additional TV platform. It is already available to customers who use Freesat and Sky.

A national press campaign to promote the launch will also begin tomorrow across the United Kingdom, according to MediaWeek.co.uk.

Al Jazeera was founded as an independent Arabic news channel in 1996. Al Jazeera English was launched in 2006.

The English-speaking portion airs from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. GMT daily, and is comprised of live news and programmes from Al Jazeera English's studios in London, Washington DC, and Doha, MediaWeek.co.uk reported. The company is funded by the state of Qatar and plans to gain a wider reach with an outdoor United Kingdom brand campaign, to be launched later this year.

With this launch, the network will now reach 80 percent of Britain's 25 million households, Reuters reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-07-01 00:02

Following the raising of paywalls across newspaper titles this month, News Corp is now putting its UK sports broadcaster, Sky Sports News, behind a paywall as well, MediaGuardian reported today.

BSkyB, which launched Sky Sports on Freeview eight years ago, is preparing to launch a new HD service. The move "marks a significant shift in BSkyB's attitude to the benefits of using the reach of the free-to-air service as a marketing channel to attract subscribers to its pay-TV service," and indicates BskyB may also put its website behind a paywall, according to the report. Sports fans will have to buy a subscription TV package to watch Sky Sports.
"As part of a subscription service, customers can look forward to expanded coverage and the launch of Europe's first HD sports news service," said Barney Francis, managiing director of Sky Sports, according to DigitalChoices.co.uk.

Sky Sports will be replaced on freeview with a "+1" time-shifted channel of Sky 3.

"I think it's another step in the chain of Murdoch deciding he won't give content away for free," Dominic Buch, an analyst at Numis, told the Financial Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-18 20:52

Future Publishing Group has teamed up with British broadcaster Channel Five and producer North One Television to launch a print edition of television programme The Gadget Show, World Screen reported.

The UK publisher will launch The Gadget Show Magazine in April, according to a press relase. The 132-page title will feature a retrospective on the ultimate gear from 2009, and developments of the future, with editorials from The Gadget Show's on-air team.

The TV series is one of the channel five's most successful show, and the brand's commercial initiative to go into print seems to be a good move, according to Print Week. The Gadget Show print edition will be available for sale at retail outlets throughout the United Kingdom at a cover price of £5.

"The partnership with Future is consistent with the ambitions of Five and North One to take The Gadget Show beyond the confines of TV and develop it into a major consumer technology brand. Future is the market leader in consumer technology publications so we couldn't be happier with their understanding of The Gadget Show brand and their commitment to establishing the new title and making it a huge success," Emma Derrick, Five's commercial development controller, told World Screen.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-02-26 20:18

The Internet tops the list of the most influential mediums, accounting for more than 40 percent of influence points in the United Kingdom and Germany, and 37 percent in France, according to the Digital Influence Index Study 2008 by Fleishman-Hillard Inc. and Harris Interactive.

TV is ranked next. Radio, newspaper and magazines lag behind with less than 20 percent of the points, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

In terms of share of time, however, TV makes up the biggest section in the United Kingdom and Germany, while the Internet comes next and then radio.

Printed media - newspaper and magazines - only account for less than 10 percent share each in the three countries surveyed, much lower than the points in terms of share of influence, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-12 23:30

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