Date

Sat - 21.10.2017


The New York Times

The New York Times is planning to further extend its international reach and tap into the promising Brazilian advertising market by launching a Portuguese-language website in the second half of next year.

The revelation follows a similar move by the Financial Times, which opened a newspaper printing plant in São Paulo earlier this month, and is taking strides to expand its Latin American web presence with a tailored homepage and mobile app.

Also rooted in São Paulo, The Times’ new site will feature approximately ten daily regional news stories reported and edited by local staff, and 20 or so articles translated from NYTimes.com. But the Portuguese-language content will not be paywall-protected (at least in the beginning); its revenue will depend entirely on advertising.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-16 23:57

by Joshua Benton

The New York Times will have a new leader in the newsroom. Jill Abramson will replace Bill Keller, who is moving to a writing job at the paper.

I'm sure Times Kremlinologists are already developing their theories about the move and its timing -- let the #______MakesYouStupid jokes begin -- but from our perspective, we're most interested in the impact the new leadership will have on the Times' digital strategy.

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-06 13:22

The New York Times's paywall launch seems to be off to a fine start, with management proudly announcing 100,000 new web-only subscribers shortly after the launch.

If each of those subscribers stick around and pay $15 a month, that's $18 million of high-margin annual revenue the company just added.

Continue reading on Business Insider

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-26 09:43

The New York Times is the latest newspaper to launch a Film Club, which offers members the possibility to attend screenings of digitally restored classics and upcoming movie releases, The New York Observer revealed Monday.

The club was "created for an audience passionate about movies," said the company in a press release. The annual membership costs US$100 for one person or $175 for couples, and it will also give access to forums after the screenings.

The first event will take place on January 5, 2011, when a restored version of The Godfather will be screened. Warner Bros. Motion Picture Imaging will provide most of the restored films, The New York Times pointed out.

According to Reuters, "the NYT, along with other newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal and USA Today, are launching clubs -- wine is especially popular -- as way to reap some extra revenue and strike a deeper relationship with readers."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-23 19:04

During the global economic downturn, The New York Times increased its home delivery rate by 5 percent, but only 0.01 percent cancelled, Gerald Marzorati, assistant managing editor for new projects and strategic initiatives at The Times, revealed last week, according to Politico. Why were there so few cancellations?

"I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that they're literally not understanding what they're paying," he said, referring to automatic subscription renewals, according to Slate. "That's the beauty of the credit card."

Those subscribers are paying US$700 or more per year for home delivery.

But savvy consumers can pay much less, Slate pointed out. By calling The Times subscription number, readers can ask to discontinue their subscriptions. When asked why, they can say it's too expensive. The Times employee taking the call will then likely offer them a 50 percent discount. (For the full list of steps, visit the Slate article). However, "as word gets around that The Times habitually charges suckers twice what it charges participants in my recommended 12-step program, the company may have to rethink its variable-pricing strategy," Slate reporter Timothy Noah states.

Marzorati made the comment last week at the Digital Hollywood New York conference in New York City.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-18 16:48

The New York Times will expand the news coverage in its DealBook section, as well as redesign its website and begin publishing its content in the print edition of the newspaper, paidContent reported.

The section, which started in 2001 as a daily financial report sent by e-mail, will also provide company profiles and key financial metrics, including "mergers and acquisitions history, top banking and legal relationships, stock ownership, and officers and directors," The New York Times explained in a press release.

"This is the next step in the evolution of DealBook, providing a community of highly-engaged readers and busy executives with essential news and insights, and keeping them plugged in to the most important news of the day," editor Andrew Ross Sorkin said.

In addition to the new design, the section will feature twice a month a column by ProPublica senior reporter Jesse Eisinger. According to ProPublica, he will "focus on accountability issues and abuses of power in the world of high finance." In recent months, The New York Times has been adding staff and contributors to the section.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-05 17:06

The New York Times has filed a trademark suit against Kachingle after the micropayment service included several of the newspaper's blogs without its permission, paidContent.org revealed yesterday.

"The suit notes that Kachingle has attempted to market its services to consumers, based on the expectation that the NYTimes.com will start charging readers for access next year," explained paidContent.org. However, the company sued for the unauthorised usage of the paper and blogs' logos and names rather than its content.

Since September 2010, Kachingle, which describes itself as "an alternative to a forced, solitary paywall," charges The New York Times' readers a "voluntary contribution of just $5/month" to access the blogs. Under the campaign "Stop the paywall," Kachingle launched a website as an alternative to newspaper's announcement about a proposed paywall for January of 2011.

According to the suit, the micropayment company initially approached the newspaper in 2009 to request access to the blogs in exchange for the fees collected from users without mentioning that it would keep 15 percent of the money. However, the media publisher said it was not interested in the partnership.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-19 18:38

The New York Times revealed on Friday its updated iPad application, which gives readers access to the content of the newspaper's 25 sections, Mashable.com reported. This version replaced the Editor's Choice app, which only offered a selection of daily articles.

The new app will be free until January of 2011, when users will be required to pay for subscription. The charges will be applied at the same time that the newspaper's paywall will be put up, paidContent.org informed. Although prices were not disclosed, the subscriptions are expected to be monthly or annual.

"When we go to the pay model, there will always be something you can access without having a paid subscription," said Yasmin Namini, senior vice president of marketing and circulation at The New York Times Media Group. "Whether it will be the free four sections you get without registering or something different, that's to be determined later."

This version corrected some of the problems of the old app by giving readers more access to multimedia features and full size photos while allowing them play videos within an article, Agence France-Press revealed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-15 23:18

The New York Times yesterday launched The Local East Village, a hyper-local news blog written in collaboration with the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University, Editor & Publisher reported.

The site will cover New York City's East Village neighborhood, which has 70,000 residents and extends from 14th Street to Houston Street and between Broadway and the East River, NYULocal.com explained.

"The Local East Village gives us another opportunity to explore ways to provide quality online journalism to communities here and across the country," deputy metro editor of The New York times Mary Ann Giordano said in a statement released by the University.

Richard G. Jones, a professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and former reporter of The New York Times, will act a The Local East Village editor while NYU students enrolled in The Hyperlocal Newsroom course will maintain the blog.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-14 19:30

The New York Times is developing a social news service in collaboration with Betaworks, the technology company that created bit.ly and TweetDeck, paidContent.org reported today.

The personalised service, called News.me, will be initially launched only for iPad and it is expected to be available later this year. According to Betaworks' chief executive officer John Borthwick, the company has been developing the app for six months, The New York Times revealed.

"We're abstracting from that a vision of how social sharing and the real-time Web are going to influence the news consumption experience," vice president of research and development at The Times Company Michael Zimbalist said. However, besides the honeycomb logo available on the website, no further details on how the service is going to work were revealed.

Earlier this year, The New York Times invested, along with AOL and Lerer Media Ventures, in Betaworks. The newspaper also sold to the technology company the prototype that it had developed for News.me, paidContent explained.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-10 23:10

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation