Date

Mon - 25.09.2017


technology

Many people see tech giants as the death of journalism. For one thing, they suck up much of the ad revenue that used to go to newspapers. For another, they make users accustomed to being given content for free. But rather than killing the news, are big digital players like Google simply forcing it to be reinvented?

This is what Robert Andrews suggests in an article, published today by paidContent, which covers a meeting of Paley Center’s international council of media executives in Madrid. Andrews quotes the head of news products and Google+ programming at Google, Richard Gingras, and Facebook’s journalism manager Vadim Lavrusik, who both presented the media executives with ways that journalism would be reformed with technology.

Among the points that Gingras made, was that technology was upending the traditional story form. “There will be a day – and it should not be far from now – where we can create persistent forms of stories not written in narrative form but in (Google) Fusion Tables and query strings, status updates and tweets,” said Gingras, quoted by Andrews.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-26 16:42

A year ago, Knight Foundation and Mozilla announced a partnership to build a "bridge between the technology and the news community". The $2.5 million project funded fellowships for technology experts to work in newsrooms around the world - from The Guardian to Zeit Online - to help tackle digital challenges.

Now, Dan Sinker, head of the Knight-Mozilla News Technology Partnership at Mozilla has announced that the program is evolving to engage a wider community of journalist-coders.

Four main changes are going to be made to the Knight-Mozilla partnership, which is being so radically re-jigged that it has also been re-named "OpenNews".

1) The project will help organise and pay for "more than a dozen hackdays" this year in different international locations, allowing developers to experiment with coding for journalism.

2) The parternship promises to increase online resources for developers who want to learn about journalism, and for journalists who want to learn how to code.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-07 18:17

In the biological world, diversity means strength. The same also goes for the publishing industry, where having a diverse portfolio can do a lot to bolster your business.

One example is Schibsted, the Scandanavian media group that was praised by WAN-IFRA in August as a "shining example of how a newspaper publisher can transform its traditional publishing business into a diversified multimedia company". At the time the company was investing heavily in online classifieds. Now it is continuing to expand its portfolio, as it plans to buy the digital music streaming company Aspiro.

Schibsted is offering to buy up Aspiro for 340 million Swedish krona (that's $49 million or £32 million), Paid Content reports. Schibsted's interest in the company is not unexpected, as it's already an 18.3% shareholder in Aspiro and Schibsted's CFO chairs Aspiro's board. Paid Content writes that, so far, one third of Aspiro shareholders have given their support to accepting Schibsted's offer.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-12 15:09

We've come a long way in the few short months since the full Hackgate scandal exploded, writes Press Gazette guest blogger Lara Fielden.

The immediate aftermath saw seismic criticism of self-regulation under the Press Complaints Commission, the departure of its chairman and demands for statutory press regulation. Punitive fines and effective licensing, akin to the model for broadcasting regulation, were the order of the day.

Continue reading on Press Gazette

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-14 08:43

Orlando, Fla., October 18, 2011-- Gartner, Inc. today highlighted the top 10 technologies and trends that will be strategic for most organizations in 2012. The analysts presented their findings during Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, being held here through October 20.

Gartner defines a strategic technology as one with the potential for significant impact on the enterprise in the next three years. Factors that denote significant impact include a high potential for disruption to IT or the business, the need for a major dollar investment, or the risk of being late to adopt.

A strategic technology may be an existing technology that has matured and/or become suitable for a wider range of uses. It may also be an emerging technology that offers an opportunity for strategic business advantage for early adopters or with potential for significant market disruption in the next five years. These technologies impact the organization's long-term plans, programs and initiatives.

Continue reading in the Gartner Newsroom

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 10:31

"One of the legacies of Steve Jobs is that he's taught us to pay for content," says Adam Bird, director, McKinsey & Company, speaking of the late Apple founder in a presentation on how consumers behave with new technologies.

When it comes to paid-for apps, books, news and magazines are doing quite well, he says. Speaking at a World Newspaper Congress session dedicated to technology, Bird focuses on how consumers are interacting with the new devices.

"If we start to think about technology in general, the only real certainty is that we are going to have more technology," he says. "The sheer volume and pace of change is phenomenal. E-mails per second are up to 2.9 million. There are 20 hours of content uploaded to YouTube per minute. The sheer scale of this is absolutely phenomenal."

What's changing the most? Bird suggests looking at mobile developments as they become more social, more video, more local.

"If we look at it in terms of mobile, if we isolate one thing that will happen, it is that every phone will become a smartphone, and it is absolutely changing how people are using them," he says. "It's almost used for everything but voice communication; we're certainly seeing that trend accelerating. Mobile is becoming a serious advertising platform as well."

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2011-10-18 11:03

RealNetworks is planning to launch a service in the first quarter of 2011 that would allow users to access content and move it to and from various devices, such as from their PCs, smartphones, tablets and maybe even televisions, ZDNet reported today.

Users would pay for the "media cloud service" monthly, and the service would use Amazon Web Services to store content.

"The media cloud service would allow you to see, access and get content on multiple phones and screens," RealNetworks CEO Robert Kimball told ZDNet. "It would be a master library of your digital life."

The company is scheduled to present at the Maxim Group Growth Conference in New York tomorrow.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-17 21:09

Online content delivery network Akamai Technologies - the biggest in terms of market share - has filed a lawsuit against competitor, start-up Cotendo Inc., paidContent reported today. Massachusetts-based Akamai claims that Cotendo, which provides website acceleration and online content delivery services, is infringing on three of its patents, but Cotendo has said it will fight the allegations in court.

The California-based Cotendo said the lawsuit, filed by Akamai and MIT, has no merit and that it will "defend the suit vigorously," the Boston Globe reported. In the suit, the plaintiffs are asking the U.S. district court for an injunction to stop Cotendo from using "methods covered by the patents," the report stated.

"When competing companies use patents to battle each other, the most common pattern is small or defunct companies suing market leaders, looking to cash in their patents. But 'predatory' patent lawsuits such as Akamai's, brought by dominant players against smaller competitors, do happen as well," paidContent's Joe Mullin explained.

Akamai has a market cap of US$9.5 billion, according to an article by Israeli business news site Globes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-12 20:07

Tech manufacturer LG Electronics is planning to launch a tablet computer in the first quarter of 2011, The Inquirer wrote yesterday. The device will be powered by Google's upcoming Android Honeycomb 3.0 operating system.

The device, christened as LG Optimus Pad, will have an 8.9 inch touchscreen and will cater both to domestic and international markets, according to a senior official from the South Korean company, TechTree and Info Sync reported.

Image via Tablet Crunch

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-05 16:05

Barnes & Noble is expected to launch its new Nook Color reader next Tuesday, CNet reported yesterday. According to The New York Times, the book retailer also teamed up with U.S.-based department store chain Wal-Mart for the sale of previous models across 2,500 stores of its outlets, starting October 24.

The 7-inch touch screen e-reader will reportedly be powered by Google's Android operating system, according to a "reliable" anonymous source, CNet informed. Wired News explained that it might not have "quite as much functionality as the iPad or full Android tablet," which is hinted by Nook Color's relatively cheaper US$249 cost.

Image of previous Nook reader from gizmag

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-22 18:45

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