Date

Sat - 19.08.2017


spain

The management of leading Spanish newspaper El País announced to staff on Friday a plan to lay off about 150 employees – or one third of staff – as part of a series of cutbacks to “guarantee the viability of the business in years to come.”

Other measures will include early retirement plans and salary cuts, announced Juan Luis Cebrián, President of the PRISA group and of El País, accompanied by directors of both the publishing group and the newspaper.

The managers called the cutbacks “painful” yet “inevitable,” citing a steep drop in revenue stemming from the contraction of the advertising market and reduced circulation. In the Spanish market, print advertising revenue has dropped by 53 percent and newspaper circulation by 18 percent over the last five years, directors told staff members.

“For every dollar that is made on the Internet, ten are destroyed in print,” said Cebrián. “It’s not a question of wanting to improve profitability. The newspaper can no longer support its current cost structure.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-08 17:42

Against a background of cuts and layoffs in the Spanish media, The Huffington Post’s Spanish counterpart El Huffington Post was launched in Madrid yesterday, marking the latest step in the brand’s global expansion.

The launch represents a fusion between traditional and new media brands. As Bloomberg Businessweek reports, El Huffington Post is being produced from the offices of Spain’s leading newspaper El País, and is 50% owned by El País’s parent company Prisa.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-07 17:23

Last February, the print edition of the left-leaning Spanish daily Público was closed down, after its bankrupt parent company Mediapubli failed to come up with enough funds to maintain it. Now a group of Público’s former journalists have formed a co-operative, and want to buy up the paper’s still-functioning website publico.es.

Working through the co-operative “Cooperativa Integral Catalana”, these former journalists aim to purchase publico.es, and to launch a new, weekly print edition of the paper. If this plan works, “other channels and formats have not been ruled out, once these first two are consolidated,” says the group, which promotes its cause under the name “Más Público”.

The co-operative has now made an offer to the commercial court, which is handling the sale of publico.es, to buy the site for a total of 240,000 euros. Although the former editor of Público, Trini Deiros, told El Mundo “our offer has been evaluated very positively by the bankruptcy administers,” the group will not know whether their bid has been successful until May 22, the deadline for the court’s decision.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-11 17:24

Spain’s economy and the newspaper industry have both been under pressure in recent years, to put it mildly. But now, in the opinion of the Spanish Federation of Journalists' Associations (FAPE), a crisis point has been reached. FAPE writes that 97% of its 20,000 journalist members are preparing to protest against threats to their industry on World Press Freedom Day on May 3, under the slogan “Without journalists, there is no journalism, without journalism, there is no democracy”.

FAPE members are preparing to “denounce the difficult situation that journalism is going through” in 41 cities across Spain, and the association is calling on the public to support its rallies.

According to FAPE, 6,234 journalists have been laid off since the financial crisis hit in 2008, 57 media organisations have been closed, and 23 have introduced redundancies. FAPE president Elsa González has blamed media executives for the industry’s current problems, and has accused them of “opting to dramatically reduce staff numbers without a clear commitment to innovation and training” instead of supporting “journalism adapted to the demands of people living in the 21st century”. 

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-02 13:51

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