Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


Social Networking

Google will likely be making a bigger effort in social media and social networking as a way to up its display advertising business, PC World reported yesterday.

"Social signals will be very relevant [to display ad sales] because the more signals you have about the ads, the better the ad will be targeted," said Henrique De Castro, Google's vice president of Global Media and Platforms, at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Technology Conference in New York, according to PC world. "So we're connecting more and more social networking or social indicator signals into our ad delivery."

Yesterday Google also announced it bought Invite Media, a bidding exchange for display advertising.

In its Doubleclick blog, Google stated that Invite "has developed technology that enables advertisers and agencies to use 'real time bidding' to buy display ad space, and to optimize display ad campaigns, across multiple advertising exchanges, all in a single interface."

The post, by Neal Mohan, vice president of product management, also stated that:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-04 19:48

Breaking promises information would not be shared without users' consent, Facebook, MySpace and other social networking sites have been sending user data to advertising companies. This information can be mined for names and other personal information, the Wall Street Journal reported today.

In sending the information to ad companies, the social networks gave user names or ID numbers that are linked to personal profiles being viewed when users clicked on ads. "After questions were raised by The Wall Street Journal, Facebook and MySpace moved to make changes. By Thursday morning Facebook had rewritten some of the offending computer code," the article stated.

Other than Facebook and MySpace, the other offending sites were Xanga, Digg, LiveJournal and Hi5.

"If you are looking at your profile page and you click on an ad, you are telling that advertiser who you are," Ben Edelman, assistant professor at Harvard Business School who studies online advertising, explained to the Journal about how Facebook operated before the fix. He was asked to look at the code on the seven sites on behalf of the Journal.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-21 22:06

The generation of digital natives, known for sharing everything online, knows what to keep offline and how to protect themselves online better than older adults, many of whom don't know how much they're actually sharing, a Pew study, to be released soon, has found.

Researchers interviewed more than 2,200 people, and found that people ages 18 to 29 are more likely to monitor their privacy settings on social networking sites than older adults, The New York Times reported yesterday. This group is also more likely to remove their names from photos so they cannot be identified, and delete comments on their profiles.

Teens under age 18 were not interviewed, and because they are not yet in university or starting their careers, likely have different privacy concerns. However, "anecdotal evidence suggests that many of them have not had enough experience to understand the downside to oversharing," The Times article stated.

Social networking sites have a financial incentive for getting users to share as much as possible. Facebook has recently rolled out a much more open, much less private version, sharing users "like"s, profile pictures and shared links with the masses, as well as accidentally allowing users' friends to see private chats.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-10 21:23

Remarkably, over this past week search giant Google was surpassed by social networking site Facebook as most visited website online in the US, with only 7.03 percent of all website visits to Facebook's 7.07 percent, according to an analysis done by Hitwise. The difference in visits, albeit small, is telling, as it reflects the growing tendency of internet users to look to their friends rather than search engines for online media.

Facebook does come in as the fourth source for visits to specifically news and media websites, behind the main Google search site, Yahoo, and MSN. But when compared to smaller search sites Google News and Google Reader, which direct 1.39 and .01 percent respectively of all upstream visitors to news and media websites, Facebook has a clear lead in providing 3.52 percent of all visits.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-17 03:35

The surge in social media has benefited journalists globally by offering them a world of information at their fingertips with powerful social networking tools and news aggregator sites. But this opportunity comes along with some risks as well. To lessen these risks, Reuters has added social media guidelines and principles to its handbook, Dean Wright, global editor for ethics, innovation and news standards at Reuters, announced yesterday in the Reuters Blog.

While Reuters embraces social media as a powerful informative tool and encourages its usage among journalists, they must ask permission from managers to use social media in conjunction with their professional lives, MediaGuardian reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-11 23:33

Facebook will launch Zero, its text-only version that may be offered by mobile phone carriers for free, according to TechCrunch. The low-bandwidth service that doesn't offer access to photos will be launched "in the coming weeks", Hexus today reported.

"We are discussing it... as an option to make Facebook on the mobile web available to everyone, anywhere and allow operators to encourage more mobile Internet usage," said a Facebook spokesperson, according to BBC News.

The social network announced at the 2010 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona that more than 100 million users access its services from their mobile phones, according to Hexus.

Data from the GSM Association, which specialises in GSM mobile technology, revealed that UK users who use their mobile phone to access the Web spend almost half of their time on Facebook.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-17 20:10

Public relations professionals and advertisers are meeting consumers on social media, where younger consumers and professionals spend an increasing amount of time, the Bangkok Post reported. According to January figures, Thailand is Facebook's second-highest growing market, with more than 150,000 new accounts set up weekly.

In New Zealand, a new survey found that 70 percent of respondents feel social media is a good way to communicate with customers, TVNZ reported. However, the Communication Agencies Association of New Zealand study also found that firms are reluctant to spend money on social media marketing budgets, with 85 percent of businesses saying they plan to invest 5 percent or less of their marketing budgets on social media in 2010.

However, businesses are planning for future investment in social media. The biggest hurdle is that many have a lack of understanding of social networking, and it is also difficult to find qualified staff in that area, CAANZ Digital Leadership Group chairman Tony Gardner told TVNZ.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-16 23:24

Google unveiled Google Buzz today, a feature that will allow Gmail users to create status updates, and also read and comment on friends' updates, The Associated Press reported.

The feature is aimed at helping Google compete with social networking site Facebook, which now has more than 400 million users around the world.
Users can choose to share their updates publicly or privately, comments are sent to Gmail inboxes, and photos can also be sent. Updates are also done in real time, like Facebook or Twitter, according to Google Buzz.

Buzz is currently being rolled out across Gmail inboxes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-09 23:07

Google is preparing to announce new Gmail features that would extend its reach into the social networking realm, the Financial Times reported today, dubbing the plans a "Facebook assault." This following last week's news that Facebook is planning to launch an e-mail service.

The search giant is looking to give Gmail users a way to aggregate contacts' updates, which can currently be viewed in Google's Chat service, within Gmail's inbox. This would create a "stream of notifications that would echo the similar real-time streams from Facebook and Twitter."

The new feature could be announced as soon as this week, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The status update widget is a further push to turn Gmail into a "comprehensive communications hub" that Google hopes would keep users within Gmail, not Facebook, according to Wired.

The Wall Street Journal article stated that:

Google has been trying to fashion Gmail into more than an email service for years. It currently lets users set an "away message"--which can be a link to a Web site--that their friends see when they message them.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-09 00:53

Teens and young adults blog less today than they did in 2006, while older adults are blogging more than ever, according to a Pew Internet Project survey, out today. Teens are also not using Twitter in large numbers, with just 8 percent of Internet users ages 12-17 using the micro-blogging service.

Currently, 14 percent of online teens say they have a blog, while 28 percent said so in 2006. Comments on blogs are down too, with 76 percent of teen social network users saying they commented on friends' blogs in 2006. Today, that number is 52 percent. For adults, 24 percent of those ages 18 to 29 said they blogged in December 2007, while just 7 percent of those age 30 and older did so. By 2009, less users age 18 to 29 blogged - just 15 percent of Internet users - while 11 percent of those age 30 and older have a personal blog.

When it comes to Twitter, older teens are more likely to use it than younger teens - 5 percent of online teens age 12 to 13 use Twitter, while 10 percent of teens ages 14 to 17 do so. Of teens, high school girls are most likely to use Twitter, with 13 percent of those ages 14 to 17 doing so; meanwhile, just 7 percent of boys the same age use Twitter.

Mobile phone ownership and Internet use is "near ubiquitous among teens and young adults," according to the study. Wireless Internet is used most by young adults, and laptops are now chosen more than desktops for those under age 30.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-04 00:01

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation