Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


social media

According to the head of Gawker Media, Nick Denton, online media need to become more like television, states an article on paidContent.org. "It means a screen which is less constrained by the need to have three or four ads and every single bit of content on one screen," Denton was quoted as saying in the article. paidContent speculated whether Denton was making reference to a future Gawker redesign.

There will always be space for writers, however, even if just to put text around a video. He expressed frustration with blogs, noting that for the Gizmodo iPhone 4 story, "we had to cease publishing for six hours to keep this story at the top of the page." Gawker's goal is to focus more on new media and less on old media. "I always say that our readers are interested in [Mark] Zuckerberg, not [Mort] Zuckerman," the article quotes Denton as saying.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-28 17:21

In an effort to find out how social media and multitasking are affecting students, Harrisburg University in Pennsylvania has blocked social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter on its central wireless system for the past week, MediaGuardian reported today.

Eric Darr, provost at the U.S. university, came up with the idea after watching his teenage daughter multitask with social networking, text messaging, music and more. "It struck me how overpowering all this was, not in a negative way, and it made me wonder what would happen if all that wasn't there," he told MediaGuardian.

Image: maebmij's flickr photostream
In the United States, 92 percent of students user Facebook and spend about 147 minutes on the site each week, USA Today reported.

"It was the observation that projects got done, contacts got made and friendships maintained, collaborations on grants happened --all of that happened through social media. And what if it weren't there? What would people do?" he said, according to ABC News.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-17 23:47

Social media usage surged among U.S. adults ages 50 and up, according to a latest survey by Princeton Survey Research Associates on behalf of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, Media Post reported.

The survey also suggested social media may be an effective advertising and marketing platform to reach older Internet users.

Photo: Tim Boyle/Getty Images

According to Pew, social network use among online users age 50 or above was up from 22 percent in April 2009 to 42 percent in May 2010. Moreover, one out of 10 people in the 50+ age group uses Twitter or a similar "status update" service to post updates or check friends' updates.

To break down the age bracket even more, among adults age between 50 and 64, social media use jumped from 25 percent to 47 percent from April 2009 to May 2010, and among those 65 and older, use surged from 13 percent to 26 percent. On the other hand, use among people age between 18 and 29 only increased from 76 percent to 86 percent, according to The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-31 22:44

The Associated Press has launched an interactive Web hub, APTop25.com, which provides in-depth coverage on college football, Editor & Publisher reported.

Readers can check out the latest news, photos, and statistics about Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Schools, as determined by the AP Top 25 Poll. Other features include content from AP member publications and college football blogs, Media Bistro reported.

Interactive tools on the site also allow users to reorder the poll, or to create their own Top 25, and share it via Twitter and Facebook. They can also customise the site, highlight both its look and content, based on their favourite team.

APTop25.com also enables user discussion and comments. Fans can sign up for team-specific e-mail newsletters, as well as in-game alerts delivered via SMS, E&P reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-23 23:12

As social media increasingly becomes part of everyday life, New York-based MTV has hired 23-year-old Gabi Gregg to be its first-ever "Twitter Jockey," The Associated Press reported today.

After a nationwide viewer vote, Gregg won the position, called a TJ. The job is a social media version of the music television station's video deejay job, or VJ. Gregg is also the founder of the fashion blog, Young Fat & Fabulous.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-09 15:53

Researchers at Hewlett-Packard have analysed 2.5 million tweets and used its "Influence-Passivity Algorithm," and found that technology website Mashable is the most influential Twitter account, based on links posted and links retweeted, MediaGuardian reported today.

"Influence" is different from "popularity," the research notes, as influence has to do with engagement, and popularity is based on the number of followers a Twitter account has.

The study states: "In spite of the seemingly chaotic fashion with which all these [Twitter] interactions take place, certain topics man- age to get an inordinate amount of attention, thus bubbling to the top in terms of popularity and contributing to new trends and to the public agenda of the community. How this happens in a world where crowdsourcing dominates is still an unresolved problem, but there is considerable consensus on the fact that two aspects of information transmission seem to be important in determining which content receives inordinate amounts of attention."

The top 10 most influential Twitter users are:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-06 20:04

Despite preferring print newspapers to electronic versions, Italians are slowly starting to change their mentality towards digital news. In 2010, the number of Italians who read online dailies has increased to 39 percent, according to a Mediawatch Journalistic Observatory survey, La Stampa reported today.

"Italians' confidence in the Internet has significantly increased over the past three years... This is an area that can become strategic," Mediawatch's President Carlo Vittorio Giovannelli said to La Voce d'Italia, remembering than in 2007 only 25 percent of Web users read online news.

Photo source: La Stampa

Trust in the information provided by online dailies has also increased from 18 percent to 45 percent in the last three years, the survey revealed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-04 17:39

Based on research carried out by Gartner, it has been determined that a whopping 20% of social media users are 'influencers.' Considering the increasing importance of such media in news dissemination and increasing website traffic, how can this information be exploited?

Grouped into 'Salesmen,' 'Connectors' and 'Mavens,' this 20% is able to influence over 70% of other users' activity. According to Nick Ingelbrecht, research director at Gartner, "Salesmen and Connectors are the most effective social network influencers and the most important groups."

Image via NYC Comets' Flickr photostream

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-27 19:40

Zero percent of people said they would pay to use Twitter, according to a study by the Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Forty-nine percent of Internet users surveyed said they have used free online micro-blogging services such as Twitter, but when asked if they would pay to use Twitter, not one person said they would, according to the study, released Friday.

"Such an extreme finding that produced a zero response underscores the difficulty of getting Internet users to pay for anything that they already receive for free," stated Jeffrey I. Cole, director of the center at USC. "Twitter has no plans to charge its users, but this result illustrates, beyond any doubt, the tremendous problem of transforming free users into paying users ... Online providers face major challenges to get customers to pay for services they now receive for free."

The study also found that Internet users don't really care for online ads, either.

Seventy percent said online advertising is "annoying," and 50 percent of the users never click on Web ads. However, ads are the lesser of two evils, with 55 percent saying they would rather see online ads than pay for content.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-26 23:17

Dubbed the world's first social magazine, the new Flipboard app for iPad combines the two things we are all addicted to: Facebook and Twitter; and in a way that is "a whole lot prettier," according to Claire Cain Miller of The New York Times.

By signing up to the magazine users can 'unclutter' both Facebook and Twitter accounts, and have 'clearer vision' of their updates and tweets through the use of tiles (see video here). Facebook seems to have fallen a bit out of favor according to recent statistics, so Flipboard could be the perfect touch at the right time in terms of maintaining popularity. Facebook and Twitter are undeniable centers of communication and are the modern day word-of-mouth agents, central to driving traffic to news websites, especially through the exchanging of links between friends.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-21 17:01

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