Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


social media

USA Today has announced the appointment of a social media editor and social media analyst, while The New York Times has just folded the social media editor position into the responsibilities of the interactive news team.

Michelle Kessler, formerly a USA Today tech reporter and editor, is now social media editor for the paper and hence responsible for social media initiatives throughout the newsroom. She will help run social.usatoday.com, which provides updates about the paper's social media activities, and @SocialUSAToday, the paper's rebranded Twitter account.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-09 19:16

Jennifer Preston's appointment as social media editor at the New York Times attracted considerable attention when it was announced last year: mainly, because the concept of the role was still new, but also because she wasn't what one might expect in what is often seen as a young, techy position. As she told the World Editors Forum study tour participants today, she had no presence in social media before she took the job, didn't have a smart phone and barely even texted.

There is a clear logic to appointing somebody with a similar profile, however. By learning everything from scratch themselves they will have more of an understanding about what difficulties people may encounter, and they are arguably likely to have more success persuading other non-social media users to change their habits.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-01 16:07

Search engine optimisation (SEO) has become a much used word in the online publishing world, and it has also been something most news publishers aim for. In fact, for many publishers, SEO has become too important - more so than even the content itself, according to Ben Elowitz, co-founder of online luxury goods retailer Blue Nile, co-founder and CEO of Web publisher Wetpaint and author of the Digital Quarters blog.

"But this movement toward SEO has been dangerous, as it's moved publishers' eye off their most important job of creating great content, and onto the false goals of keywords, hacks, paid links, and technical engineering that their audience doesn't know or care about," he wrote in a column for paidContent.

He continued:

"But the recent announcement of the Facebook/Bing partnership to integrate social and search results clearly marks the beginning of the end of SEO, and the smartest digital publishers will drop everything to rethink their distribution strategy entirely.

"With the rise of Facebook, we've entered a new era of digital media: personalized discovery. The balance of power is shifting: Already sites at Wetpaint and other publishers are seeing more audience coming from Facebook than from search...

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-24 17:05

In a move that could threaten Google, Yahoo and AOL, social networking giant Facebook is planning to launch a webmail service on Monday, Slate reported today.

"Facebook has the world's most popular photos product, the most popular events product, and soon will have a very popular local deals product as well," TechCrunch's Jason Kincaid wrote.

Image via CNet

The initiative (termed "Project Titan") is believed to have e-mail features that analyse events, photos and friends from a user's page and use the data to then analyse e-mail and short messages, The Inquirer reported. Users will have facebook.com e-mail addresses, the Financial Times informed.

"The big unknown, though, is what Facebook e-mail could supply beyond an inbox and address book. Gmail genuinely innovated with storage capacity, the ability to archive e-mail, secure communications by default, and customisation through labs features. What might Facebook accomplish, especially given its quantitative knowledge of who is most important to whom in the social realm?" pondered CNet's Stephen Shankland.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-12 17:59

Micro-blogging service Twitter gained 30 million new users over the past two months, which puts its total member count at 175 million, San Francisco Chronicle reported today. According to TG Daily, it could reach a userbase of 200 million by the end of the year.

"It has become so muscular and ubiquitous that it now competes with the likes of Google and Facebook for users -- and is beginning to compete with them for advertising dollars," wrote New York Times journalist Claire Cain Miller.

Three years ago, Twitter had 503,000 users. In 2009, the number exploded to 58 million, PC Mag informed. According to WWWery, back in April and September, Twitter had 105 million and 145 registered users, respectively. The start-up currently attracts 370,000 new users per day.

The Times explained that Twitter not only changed the process of obtaining and distributing news content but that it also altered how public figures communicate. It might as well be on the verge of joining the ranks of other Web companies that "dominate the whole globe," the Chronicle added.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-01 16:49

In the recent past, one of the biggest criticisms of the non-profit sector was its ineffective method in "selling itself." Many non-profit organisations admittedly encountered problems in their marketing and advertising, or what some in the field prefer to call "advocacy." This often led to sub par fund raising events, awareness campaigns that rarely reach beyond the inner circles, and difficulties in bringing in new constituents. Several organisations still rely solely on the older methods of fliers, newsletters, and mailing or phone lists, but clearly these avenues are becoming more and more limiting. In a digital age, advocacy is not what it used to be, and non-profits, with their lack of funds and manpower, are finding that they need to work even harder to keep up with current and potential supporters.

"The history of advocacy and marketing goes like this: we started with face to face approaches, then it went to snail mail, then TV and radio, then email, and now we've rapidly moved into a society that is growing more into the online space," Rob Wu, founder of the networking and fund raising platform CauseVox, pointed out. He went on to talk about the prevalence of social media marketing and the use of technological innovations in this field.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-25 23:34

"Need a break? So does the rainforest."

This was the message behind Greenpeace's social media campaign last March against Swiss chocolate giant, Nestlé. The environmental organisation criticised Nestlé for using palm oil suppliers that allegedly destroy Indonesian rainforests and threaten the Orangutan habitat.

Just days after posting a one-minute commercial parody on YouTube featuring an office worker taking a break with a Kit Kat bar made of orangutan fingers, Greenpeace and hundreds of thousands of people across the globe watched the video go viral. They also watched Nestlé's reputation take a beating.

The company, largely unprepared for the ensuing social media PR battle, was "wall bombed" with complaints on its Facebook page. Nestlé asked YouTube to remove the video due to copyright, and even tried to censor the negative comments on its Facebook page. But outgunned by critics, Nestlé's moderator later issued an apology stating: "This was one in a series of mistakes for which I would like to apologize. And for being rude. We've stopped deleting posts, and I have stopped being rude."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-21 21:57

While many NGOs, non-profits, and news organisations are still baffled and skeptical of the impact new media tools can have, Americas Society is embracing the Web and social media to broadcast news and augment their readership. By engaging with Twitter, Facebook, and Web 2.0 platforms, Americas Society is an example of cultural institutes and policy think tanks coming into the digital realm.

On Sept. 23, hours after news broke that a Colombian military attack had resulted in the death of a Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia leader, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos spoke at an Americas Society event in New York. Live tweeting of Santos' remarks entered the international news stream, and it was announced to the world that not only had the FARC leader, Mono Jojoy, been killed, but 14 computers and 60 USB drives of information about the FARC had also been seized by Colombian authorities.

Santos: "What happened back home in #Colombia with this military success we had 24 hrs ago is going to change our history." (http://twitter.com/ascoa)

Santos went on to compare the significance of Jojoy's death to the Colombian authorities with an announcement to New Yorker's that "Osama bin Laden had been struck down."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-19 00:16

CNN's first global research study into the power of news and recommendation (Powar) revealed that 27 percent of Internet users are responsible for sharing 87 percent of news links, MediaGuardian reported today. Each of these frequent users shares and average of 13 stories per week and receives at least 26.

According to the study, social media like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube continue to be the most powerful sharing tools and they are responsible for 43 percent of the articles shared. These sites are closely followed by e-mail (30 percent), SMS 15 (percent) and instant messenger 12 (percent), Journalism.co.uk reported.

Photo source: Virgin Media

At least 65 percent of the shared content is composed by news stories while breaking news and funny articles only represent 19 percent 16 percent, respectively.

Furthermore, CCN's research also found sharing patterns according to the geographic location of users. For instance, Americans share contents that they think could be useful for family and friends and Europeans focus more on stories related with work, The Guardian pointed out.

The study was conducted among 2,300 Internet users between June and August.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-10-07 22:09

As a new form of interactive journalism is evolving, the news industry needs to research and implement different social media distribution strategies. NPR has demonstrated a reckless abandonment in optimizing social media, thus making the business an example for other newspapers to follow. Over the summer NPR launched its Argo Project, which links hyperlocal NPR blogs across the nation. NPR was also noted for using Facebook to both promote its articles and as a method of content sourcing. Recently, NPR conducted a survey between its Facebook and Twitter users, which reveals different behaviors each type of user demonstrates when consuming news.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-01 16:06

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