Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


social media sites

Some news websites are seeing remarkably strong traffic to old stories, prompting an intriguing question -- how important is it, really, that news be new?

Tim Bradshaw reports in the Financial Times about "a surge of Facebook traffic to years-old stories" since some websites enabled the open graph, or so-called "frictionless sharing," to Facebook of every article a person reads.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-11-30 09:12

by Gina Masullo Chen

If your Facebook feed is like mine, it has been full of complaints recently over the latest changes Facebook has made to its interface. People don't like the Twitteresque status-update feeds. They don't think Facebook should decide what "stories" are likely to be popular. They don't understand the new friend groups, unless they are also on Google Plus and love its "circles." In general, it seems that many people want to go back to the old way (which many hated when it first came out, too).

Continue reading on Nieman Journalism Lab

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-05 12:38

Google+ has taken off like no other social network before it. While it's still in 'limited field trial' mode, it's already being seriously considered as a contender to take on Twitter and Facebook. Journalists already use both those networks to great effect. Could Google+ see similar usage?

Some journalists have already started experimenting with Google+ as a way to share, discuss or source news. Here are a few examples:

Continue reading on TNW Google

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-27 10:03

Facebook has a war on its hands, and Mark Zuckerberg knows it. Practically overnight, Google+ has gone from a rumor to a thriving community with over 10 million members. With some 700 million members of its own, Facebook is thinking less and less about how to grow that number and more about how to get current users to live more of their lives within its virtual walls.

Continue reading on Forbes

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-21 10:55

Vadim Lavrusik, the cherub-cheeked 25-year old who heads up Facebook's new journalist program initiative, has been generating a lot of chatter in media circles, and not just for his thoughtful missives about how ink-stained wretches could better utilize the social network to promote their work or find sources. His arrival, along with a few other moves by the social-media company, suggests Facebook may be looking at ways to turn the site into a distribution -- and money making -- platform for news.

Continue reading on CNNMoney

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-26 09:31

The Sunday Times' Social List, a site sitting outside its paywall, might be seen by some as a late bandwagon attempt to build subscriber numbers, but it's cleverer than that.

While commentators have become fixated on how using algorithms to measure influence and status can never be a true reflection of influence - The Independent attracted such criticism with its PeerIndex Twitter 100, which it launched in March - The Sunday Times Social List is intended as a participatory "fun and engaging piece of social entertainment", according to the site.

Continue reading on newmediaage

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-25 10:24

by Amy Gahran

Last week I attended an event for journalists at Facebook's Silicon Valley headquarters featuring a panel of journalists discussing how they use Facebook. Founding Salon.com editor Scott Rosenberg also was there, and this week he wrote a blog post exploring whether journalists and news organizations should be wary about depending too heavily on Facebook for their public engagement...

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-09 10:15

According to a survey by analytical firm comScore, Facebook and Twitter have both reached the top 10 in Web resources in Russia, Lenta.ru reported today. In July 2010, Twitter's users reached 1.8 million, six times the number at the same time last year. Facebook, meanwhile, attained four times more visitors than in 2009, amounting to 3.9 million.


Yuliya Udovenko, marketing director of MindShare Interaction (worldwide media communications group), explained that there was a heightened interested towards international Internet projects in the country, Kommersant wrote. She added that advertisers were more likely to be interested in Facebook and YouTube.

Overall, Russia's Internet audience boasted a 31 percent hike since last year, rising to 43.3 million unique users over the age of 15, according to a comScore study of 100 top-ranking sites. Pornographic websites and Web outlets launched since summer 2009 were not taken into consideration. The study featured installing statistics software on 20,000 users aged 15 and above.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-15 21:02

Social networking sites are now competing with news publishers as sources of breaking news and information, new research from UK firm iCD shows, Journalism.co.uk reported today.

High usership of social networks, combined with aggregated and personalised news streams on Facebook and Twitter, had led to this trend. According to the study, which polled 1,000 people in United Kingdom, the top destination for news seekers was the BBC's website, where 50.4 percent of people said go to for breaking news. In second place was social networking sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, at 18.5 percent, and in third place was SKY news, at 18.1 percent.

Graph: Journalism.co.uk
The study showed that a slightly higher percent of female users go to social networking sites as an informative resource.

Among national newspapers, the most preferred newspaper, and in fourth place overall, was the Daily Mail (12.8), followed by The Sun (7.1 percent), the Daily Telegraph (6.7 percent), the Guardian (5.9 percent), The Times (5.4 percent), the Daily Mirror (3.4 percent), The Independent (3.2 percent), the Financial Times (2.8 percent), the Daily Express (2.7 percent), The Evening Standard (2.7 percent) and News of the World (2.4 percent).

Meanwhile, 3.5 percent chose blogs and 3.3 percent choose RSS feeds as a way to receive the latest news updates. Another 27.6 percent said they do not get their news from the Internet.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-08-13 23:09

Spanish media are aware of the impact of social media and the importance of getting their content where conversations are taking place. According to a study published by Vector Software Factory, 75 percent of Spain's online media sites have an official account on Facebook while 76 percent also use Twitter to share content, prnoticias.com reported.

"The reading habits of users, who are not faithful to only one source of news because of the easiness to access information online and the multiple choices they have, are pushing media to go out and meet their users," Javier Mazo, spokesperson of Vector Software Factory told Puromarketing.com.

Although the option to send an article through e-mail has become a must, Spanish sites are offering users different options to share the content directly to social media sites and news aggregating services such as Menéame, which is used by 73.75 percent of the online media, Del.i.cious (68.75 percent), Facebook (66.25 percent), Twitter (53,75 percent) and MySpace (20 percent).

According to Mazo, the study shows that "information has become more important than the media that is shared."

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-07 23:39

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