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Thu - 23.11.2017


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What do a YouTube video satirising Pakistan’s army, an article criticising the Polish Agency for Enterprise Development, and a video of a Canadian citizen peeing on his passport have in common? They were all the objects of government requests to remove content from Google sites during the second half of 2011, says Google.

The company has just released its latest round of data, documenting demands made by governments to remove content from its sites or to turn over information about its users. Google, which began publishing this data as part of its Transparency Report in 2010, expressed concern as it noted that, for the fifth six-month period in a row, it has received requests from governments to remove political content. What’s more, the demands didn’t just come from countries with a traditionally poor press freedom record, but from Western democracies too.

“Unfortunately, what we’ve seen over the past couple years has been troubling, and today is no different,” wrote Google’s Senior Policy Analyst Dorothy Chou in a blog post about the data. “It’s alarming not only because free expression is at risk, but because some of these requests come from countries you might not suspect—Western democracies not typically associated with censorship.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-18 15:22

Demand Media has entered into a partnership with Hearst Group to produce content for two of its publications, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Houston Chronicle, Erik Sherman reported last week in a Bnet.com article. The move, in which Demand will create articles and videos for SFGate.com's real estate section and Chron.com's small business section, advances the company's reach into traditional media.

Sherman reported that the normal rate offered by Demand for a few hundred words of outsourced article is US$7.50 to the writer and about $3.50 for copy editing, but Mike Taylor, an author on the MediaBistro Blog reported that Demand actually pays an average of $15 to $20 per article, with price variations depending on the kind of work and level of distribution. Demand pays $30 for videos.

"At Demand's current pay rate, I'd be making almost a buck an hour," The New York Times' David Carr wrote.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-26 21:12

The unique audience for online search in the United States grew from less than 100 million in February 2003 to more than 140 million in February 2009, up 50 percent, according to the Nielsen Company. Member communities and e-mail also increased from about 60 million uniques to more than 100 million, with 87 percent and 76 percent six-year growth rates, respectively, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

The biggest gainer, however, is online video, which had an audience of less than 30 million unique users in February 2003. It surpassed email in November 2007, and had more than 100 million viewers in February 2009, up 339 percent within the six years.

In terms of time spent on each sector in the United States, e-mail was on top, and increased from less than six billion minutes in February 2003 to more than 20 billion minutes in February 2009, up 268 percent. Member communities accounted for about two billion minutes, and jumped to more than 20 billion and exceeded e-mail in February 2009, up 883 percent, according to the Nielsen Company.

Search accounted for about 2.5 billion minutes, and increased to about six billion in 2009, a growth of 193 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-19 18:00

Google Inc announced a 23 percent revenue increase in 1Q on a rebound in online advertising. However, its stock price fell 5 percent to US$565.50 on Thursday, after a 5 percent growth since Monday. It looks like there's still a long way for the company to go before it sees its stock prices return to pre-recession levels, The Associated Press reported in an article posted by the Washington Post.

"They've had a strong last few days ... and some investors expected Google to beat by a wider margin and price-per-click to come in a bit higher than 7 percent growth," Edward Jones analyst Andrew Miedler said.

Photo: AP Photo/Paul Sakuma

"They just weren't good enough," said Capital Advisors Vice President Channing Smith, Reuters reported.

Google is trying to maintain its rapid pace of growth, but analysts points out some challenges including the growing regulatory and legal headaches around the world, and its withdrawal from China.

Facing the growing competition from Apple Inc. in the mobile advertising market and people's concerns on its relative lack of success outside search, Google has pledged to keep investing heavily.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-16 21:19

Internet advertising revenues in the United Kingdom rose by 4.2 percent from US$5 billion in 2008, to $5.3 billion in 2009, according to the new study conducted by the Interactive Advertising Bureau and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Since the dot com crash of 2001, Internet advertising spending in the country reported growth every year during the decade - from $232 million in 2000 to $5.3 billion. It has boosted 2,200 percent, Mike Sachoff wrote on the Internet Financial News.

The online ad growth outperformed the overall British advertising market, which, according to ZenithOptimedia's data in December, had an estimated 13 percent drop in 2009, Reuters reported.

The biggest gainer in 2009 was paid search, which was up by 9.5 percent to reach $3.1 billion, making up 60.7 percent of all online ad spending, compared to 59.3 percent in 2008.

Although online display saw a yearly 4.4 percent decline in 2009, online video performed well, with a 140 percent increase year-over-year.

"In 2009 the advertising industry was hit hard but online has proved itself a winning medium, capturing a greater share of marketing budgets," according to Guy Phillipson, chief executive officer of the IAB.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-02 22:30

Online search and e-mail are the two most popular online activities in Europe, which 84 percent and 79 percent of respondents in 2007, respectively, performed at least once a month, according to EIAA.

The figures rose to 87 percent and 81 percent in 2008. More than 40 percent of respondents used online social networking at least once a month, while more than three out of 10 used instant messaging, listened to Web radio, downloaded music or watched movies/videos in 2008, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to BIGresearch SIMM 13 Study, shopping and weather were the top two online activities for fun and entertainment among U.S. online users, with 38 percent and 35 percent of respondents saying they regularly did so, respectively.

Checking movie reviews/schedules, viewing photos from friends, checking sport news and scores and playing video games were also popular; more than two out of 10 regularly did one of those activities, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-26 21:45

Interactive marketing will reach about US$55 billion, or 21 percent of all marketing spend in 2014, according to Forrester's new study "U.S. Interactive Marketing Forecast, 2009 To 2014."

As marketing budgets are shuffled from traditional toward interactive media, such as search marketing, display advertising, e-mail marketing, social media and mobile marketing, the cannibalisation of traditional media will lead to "a decline in total advertising budgets, death to obsolete agencies, a publisher awakening, and a new identity for Yahoo!."

This year, search marketing still make up the most interactive spending, representing 59 percent of the overall interactive pie, according to the study. By 2014, spending on paid listings, which includes paid inclusion, and search engine optimisation (SEO) will increase at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 15 percent to $32 billion.

Display ad spending, including contextual listing and online video, has experienced a drop this year as many marketers moved branding dollars to direct response media in this recession. However, it is still strong, and will grow at a CAGR of 17 percent to nearly $17 billion by 2014, Forrester reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-11 23:09

Google Search Appliance, the search hardware used by the online giant, is now able to show tweets along with internal search results, Google announced today.

This real-time information comes thanks to partnerships with Twitter, as well as Facebook, MySpace, FriendFeed, Jaiku and Identi.ca. Yahoo Search, meanwhile, has also expanded space for tweets within its search results, InformationWeek reported today.

"Social information is important for businesses: employees searching for information needed to do their jobs benefit from real-time news too. They might be developing a new breakfast cereal, or designing a marketing plan for a clothing line, or writing strategy report for a political campaign. In all of these cases, understanding what is being said just as Twitter users are saying it can be invaluable," Cyrus Mistry, product manager of Google Enterprise Search stated in a blog post.

The new Twitter function in GSA can be enabled, and then users can choose how Tweets are viewed in their search results; however, financial terms are not yet clear, according to the Washington Post.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-11 00:27

In the category of "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em," the world's most powerful search engine has retooled its approach to content aggregation, possibly avoiding future copyright infringement liability.

Google on Tuesday announced in a blog post by Senior Business Product Manager Josh Cohen that it had adjusted its First Click Free programme, The Associated Press reported Wednesday. The technology change makes it possible for publishers to limit readers to five unpaid page views per day before redirecting them to a subscription form, Google spokesman Chris Gaither told sfnblog Wednesday via e-mail.

The change comes in response to repeated complaints by news publishers that Google searches let potential subscribers circumvent paywalls. Google's answer to date had been for publishers to recode content so that it would be de-indexed. This response was deemed unsatisfactory in that, as Cohen observed during a townhall at the Federal Trade Commission on Tuesday, news publishers can hardly afford to be undiscoverable.

The technical problem, as Gaither explained it to sfnblog, was that Google had a strict policy against redirection of readers, which is a mechanism called cloaking often used by unethical Web site owners. Thus, to respect redirection to a subscription form was to permit a form of cloaking, which Google's search engine was previously coded not to do.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-08 15:42

Microsoft's new search engine, Bing, kept on growing slowly and its market share was up another half point in October, Business Insider reported.

Bing's market share was up from 9.4 percent in September to 9.9 percent in October, according to comScore.

Compared to the figures in June this year, it has had an 18 percent growth. "That is significant, but not overwhelming," according to Business Insider.

Yahoo, however, lost almost one percentage point from 18.8 percent in September to 18 percent in October, while Google's share was up a little from 64.9 percent to 65.4 percent

The overall search volume rose 13.2 percent in October, although lower than the 17.3 percent growth in September.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-11-17 21:45

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