Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


rupert murdoch

German publisher Axel Springer has joined the chorus of publishers seeking to abandon the free-for-all Internet news business model, The New York Times reported yesterday. To achieve this goal, though, Springer plans to enlist the help of Google, the most powerful search engine, paidContent said today.

Springer's proposed partnership deviates from the emerging pack of traditional media, which has generally cast Google as the villain in this unfolding story, according to Wednesday's report in The Telegraph.

Besides working with Google on content delivery, Springer is negotiating billing of subscribers through their mobile telephone service, The Wall Street Journal today reported.

"One thing is clear: the customer wants it to be easy and quick," Springer Chief Executive Mathias Döpfner was quoted by The Journal as saying.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-08 21:09

News Corp. chairman Rupert Murdoch stated in a workshop on journalism in the Internet age hosted by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Tuesday that the newspaper industry needs to convince readers to pay for online content, instead of hoping government to help, AFP reported.

"Warning that "government using its heavy hand to overregulate or to subsidise us," he said that publishers "need to a better job of persuading consumers that high quality reliable news and information does not come free," according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

"Good journalism is an expensive commodity." Murdoch added that government's role is to "reduce unnecessary regulation and eliminating obstacles to growth and investment." For example, setting up a rule prohibiting ownership of a paper and TV station in the same city, he said.

In addition, he also emphasised the importance of the digital realities, as well as the shift of business models.

"The old business model based on advertising only is dead. It cannot sustain newspapers over the long term," he said. "In the future, good journalism will depend on the ability of a news organisation to attract readers by providing news and information they're willing to pay for."

"Quality content is not free," he reiterated.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-01 23:06

News Corp.'s Rupert Murdoch is no longer standing alone in the wind as he rails against the unpaid aggregation of content by search engine giant Google, Bloomberg reported yesterday. Publishers A.H. Belo and MediaNews Group may soon shield their content with paywalls, and de-index that paid content from search engines, Editor & Publisher reported.

Publishers resent Google because it does not share with them the money it makes from advertisements displayed next to news search results, Reuters said yesterday. Murdoch's ire goes one step further, seeking direct compensation from search engines for access to News Corp.'s articles, BBC reported yesterday.

The contemplated pullout entails severe risk of invisibility for the publications at issue, MediaBuyerPlanner yesterday observed. Currently, Google enjoys 65 percent of the U.S. search market, leaving Microsoft's Bing only 9.9 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-25 13:10

Days after media mogul Rupert Murdoch accused Google of copyright infringement, two media lawyers co-authored an editorial in one of Murdoch's U.S. newspapers in defense of such a theory, TechDirt reported Friday.

According to Bruce Sanford and Bruce Brown of Baker Hostetler in Washington, D.C., the world's largest search engine is illegal because it "make[s] and store[s] full copies of texts to power [its] search functions, profit[s] from this material, and at the same time demand[s] that copyright holders opt out if they don't want to be google-able," they wrote in a Wall Street Journal editorial.

Image: Murdoch at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, 2007. Photo from WEF's Flickr.

The lawyers, using last week's book-scanning settlement extension as the timepeg for the opinion piece, characterise Google's defense as analogising its services to that of a library. They reject the legal shield such a premise implies - that of "fair use" - saying search engines earn ad revenue for cataloguing information where libraries do not, rendering the search engines' use inherently unfair.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 20:01

A study released Monday by a business strategy firm shows that less than half of Americans would be willing to pay for news online, Nasdaq reported today. Meanwhile, as many as 66 percent of Finns, 63 percent of Germans and 62 percent of Italians on average would pay between US$5 and $7 monthly for Internet-based journalism, The Guardian today reported.

The Boston Consulting Group's findings were extrapolated from a survey of 5,000 respondents, according to Sunday's New York Times.
However, the group that produced the report has ties with Rupert Murdoch, controlling stakeholder and CEO of News Corp., who has announced the media conglomerate will soon begin charging for online content. These ties may prove to undermine the impartiality of the study:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 17:52

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. was all the buzz this morning with many ups and downs for the media conglomerate simultaneously underway.

First, the corporation posted double-digit gains for the most recent quarter, thanks in large part to its box office hit, "Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs," The Associated Press yesterday reported.

Next, a freefall in MySpace traffic was reported by Wired to cost the media giant US$100 million, though Murdoch was quoted by Reuters in July as saying, "Hell, no!" to a query about whether he would be selling the failing social networking site.

Then, Scripps News Interactive Inc. beat News Corp.'s bid for a controlling stake in the Travel Channel in a deal that values the cable-television network at US$975M, Bloomberg today reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 17:26

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has increasingly pushed for paid online content, and last week announced that in the next fiscal year, the media conglomerate will continue to see advertising revenues dwindle. In its place, he said, consumers will be asked to pay for high quality journalism, all while trying to put a stop to "plagiarists and aggregators" of News Corp. content, The Age reported Sunday.

Using the News. Corp.-owned Wall Street Journal, as well as The Times and Sunday Times in the United Kingdom as evidence quality online content can succeed, Murdoch said he believes online subscription-based news "consumers will reward us with their loyalty for years to come and we will ultimately be able to better tailor our offerings to them while building new business models and generating more revenue."

In fiscal year 2010, News Corp.'s advertising revenues will account for "significantly less" of the overall revenue pie, a trend that will accelerate in years to come, he said, the Brisbane Times reported.

According to ABC News, Murdoch recently referred to search engine companies like Yahoo! and Google as "content kleptomaniacs."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-19 15:12

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch today told the Chinese government it should follow India's example and open its media market up to outside competition, The Times of India reported.

Murdoch told the first World Media Summit in Beijing that India's opening up its market to foreign competitors served as a creative and financial catalyst, and China should learn from this example.

"The digital renaissance offers China an opportunity to exercise leadership," Murdoch said, according to the Wall Street Journal. Saying the government could open the country's "digital door," Murdoch alluded to China's "open door" policy in the 1970s, which led to economic reforms, the WSJ reported.

President Hu Jintao, meanwhile, told the world's media executives they should promote "true, correct, comprehensive and objective" news, according to The Age.

Some observers said the event "more closely resembles tribute rituals of the Chinese imperial court, as well as the modern-day functions and structures of the Communist Party," The Age reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-09 22:24

Although they're not where they once were, traditional newspaper and television advertising are making a comeback, News Corporation CEO Rupert Murdoch said at a conference in Tokyo today, Dow Jones reported.

"It may be that (Internet advertising) has become something of a secular trend, but we are seeing newspaper advertising coming back, though not yet to its previous levels," Murdoch said. "Television is still the strongest way to advertise."

Murdoch told conference-goers during a Q&A session that in Australia, News Corp. is seeing some advertising making its way from the Internet back to print newspapers, according to Dow Jones.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-06 16:53

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has announced all the media conglomerate's news Web sites will begin charging for access to content by next summer, the Guardian reported Thursday.

"Quality journalism is not cheap," Murdoch said, according to the Guardian. "The digital revolution has opened many new and inexpensive distribution channels but it has not made content free. We intend to charge for all our news Web sites."

Murdoch's announcement follows news of News Corp.'s second quarter net loss of US$203 million.

However, PC World expressed skepticism that such a move to charging for online content could carry such a significant financial burden and doubted whether Murdoch could convince readers to pay for his content when similar products are so prevalently available for free.

The PC World article also pointed out that the inevitable reduction in traffic could impact the company's advertising revenue.

Murdoch, however, has said he believes the model will succeed, and will be a leader in the switch to paid content online. "I believe that if we're successful, we'll be followed fast by other media," he said, according to the Guardian

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-06 18:39

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