Date

Wed - 13.12.2017


rupert murdoch

As the Wall Street Journal plans to launch its new 10-page metro edition today, with the admitted purpose of competing directly with The New York Times, analysts everywhere are asking why.

The Journal's metro launch will cost it US$30 million over the next two years, and the paper is not particularly prized by locals for its New York city coverage. But this move comes as an obvious extension of what has been an ongoing battle against The Times since Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. bought Dow Jones, the WSJ's parent company, in 2007.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Photo: Huffington Post

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-26 20:47

In an interview with columnist Caitlin Moran in the Radio Times, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown spoke against the implementation of online paywalls, arguing that "People will pay for certain things, and should pay for certain things, but I think there's a whole sort of element of communication that's got to be free." He continued, adding that "people mind paying for basic news."

As the Telegraph points out, Brown's position is similar to that of Google CEO Eric Schmidt, who believes that paywalls will work only for niche and specialist markets. Brown's pointed statement seems to be directed against News Corp CEO Rupert Murdoch, who recently announced his plans to move the digital content of News International papers like The Sunday Times and The Sun behind a paywall.
Brown's timely comments may have a political subtext, Techradar notes. With a general election next month, the Prime Minister may be doing his best to court young music and tech fans, in order to capture the important "early-adopters" vote this week. The Guardian also brought up a possible connection between the fact that Murdoch's titles recently switched from supporting the Labour towards backing the Conservatives in the upcoming May elections.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-13 23:19

News Corp's New York Post and the Wall Street Journal are offering discounts for ad prices, according to people familiar with the plan, the Financial Times reported.

The Wall Street Journal earlier announced to launch a New York edition in late April. According to the FT, by offering the discounts, Rupert Murdoch is trying to ramp up competition with The New York Times - which is a strategy similar to those he has used before to expand his business in other cities.

Photo: Bildungblog


The FT reported that discounts for full-page ads appear to be between 79 and 83 percent, Reuters reported.

According to the FT citing people briefing on the plans, Murdoch will invest about $30 million in 2010 and 2011, to back up the New York edition of the Wall Street Journal.

However, the company said the ad discounts were not as high as 80 percent and declined an investment as much as $30 million on the new edition, the FT reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-04-09 19:43

Two of Britain's top-selling newspapers will start charging for online content beginning in June.

The Times and The Sunday Times made the announcement Friday. Readers will be charged £2 for a week's subscription, or £1 for a day's access to two new sites, thetimes.co.uk and sundaytimes.co.uk. Existing subscribers to the print editions will be given free online access, according to Times Online.

Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corporation, parent company of The Times, announced in August plans to charge for online content on all of the company's newspaper Web sites.

Rebekah Brooks, chief executive of News International - a British division of News Corp. - said this of the announcement in a statement Friday: "This is a crucial step towards making the business of news an economically exciting proposition. We are proud of our journalism and unashamed to say that we believe it has value."

News International, which includes The Sun, The Times, The Sunday Times and News of the World, said in a statement that The Times and The Sunday Times would introduce new Web sites in early May, separating their online content from a combined site for the first time.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-30 01:30

The Wall Street Journal's New York section, set to launch in April, will compete against The New York Times for local readers and major advertisers, a cause for concern at The Times. Although capturing maximum readership, attracting advertisers and creating a solid customer base will not be easy for the Journal, it also means that The Times has something to lose, while the Journal is looking at a tremendous opportunity, AdvertisingAge reported.

Sources "close to the situation" told Ad Age that The Journal's New York section is expected to include coverage of New York's sports teams, as well as reports on culture, news from City Hall and even state government coverage from Albany, according to AdAge. The Journal is expected to chase advertisers and the paper might eventually hire sales staff for the metro edition.

Rupert Murdoch, Chairman and CEO of News Corp., which owns the Journal, announced the launch of the section yesterday. Although he did not mention The Times by name, he said that "a certain other New York daily has essentially stopped covering the city the way it once did and instead has focused on being more of a national newspaper interested mostly in prizes."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-03 22:34

News Corp.'s Wall Street Journal will have a new section focusing on New York area news in April, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Rupert Murdoch said in a speech before the Real Estate Board of New York, Bloomberg reported.

The move is aimed to compete against The New York Times on local readers and major advertisers, according to paidContent. Even though Murdoch did not mention by name, he said "a certain other New York daily has essentially stopped covering the city the way it once did and instead has focused on being more of a national newspaper interested mostly in prizes."

The paper is recruiting reporters and editors for the new section, but none of the specifics have been provided yet.

"I can tell you that the new section will be full-colour and it will be feisty, and will cover state and local political news, business, culture, sports and real estate," he added.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-02 21:56

As News Corp. announced profits of US$254 million over the three months up to December, Rupert Murdoch said his company is close to implementing online subscription models for all of its newspapers like the Times, the News of the World, and the Sun.

The company is also in "advanced negotiations" with handheld-device manufacturers about possible paywalls that would allow customers access to News Corp. content "whenever and wherever they want it," said Murdoch.

According to Murdoch, "ingenious and fabulous devices" like the iPad and the Kindle "would be unloved and unsold" without the creative content supplied by newspapers. "Content is not just king, it is the emperor of all things digital. We're on the cusp of a digital revolution from which our shareholders will profit handsomely," said Murdoch.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-03 18:20

Content wants to be free, and the nature of the Internet makes that possible - this has long been the refrain against paid online content. But as print sales and advertising have been on a downward spiral, made even worse by the global financial crisis over the past year, the argument for paid content has resurfaced, and this time, it's stronger. If news publishers haven't already put up some form of a paywall, they are seriously considering it.

However, one hurdle many general news outlets haven't considered yet was voiced by Alan Mutter. "One of the problems is newspapers fired so many journalists and turned them loose to start so many blogs," he told The New York Times. "They should have executed them. They wouldn't have had competition. But they foolishly let them out alive."

Image: Glenn Karlsen's flickr photostream

Competing with former employees is not yet a major consideration, but could become one as newspapers and other content creators push forward with plans to make some or all online content paid.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-29 22:52

Sony Corp.'s e-reader will begin offering an exclusive digital version of two News Corp.-owned properties, the financial news service Marketwatch.com and the New York Post, a tabloid, the Japanese company announced today.

A digital version of the Wall Street Journal, also owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., is already available on Amazon's Kindle; however, Sony will offer an exclusive daily news update after the markets close, called Wall Street Journal Plus, Agence France Presse reported.

Photo: The New York Times blogs
It's well known that Murdoch has criticised the Kindle, saying Amazon takes more than its share of subscription fees. It has been speculated that News Corp. may walk away from Kindle completely, "but the new 'exclusive agreement for automatic updates on Sony readers appears to be the best counter the company could muster," a BusinessWeek report stated today. On the Kindle, users must manually download the newspaper each morning.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-17 23:19

Rupert Murdoch bought Dow Jones & Co. and its flagship newspaper the Wall Street Journal two years ago on Sunday in a US$5.16 billion takeover bid, which ended more than 100 years of ownership by the Bancroft family. At the time, Murdoch stood atop four boxes of copy paper to reassure journalists that their "tremendous values" would be preserved under new ownership. "If anything, you will find us trying to set a higher bar."

Since then, Murdoch has considered making the WSJ's Web site free, and did lift some pay barriers, but ended up sticking to its pay wall, continuing its reign as a top example of a newspaper making money from paid online content. The WSJ has also taken some cost cutting measures, such as closing bureaux, as well as launching new money-makers, such as a new specialty product to provide subscribers more specialised news in niche areas.

Photo: The Associated Press

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-14 19:43

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation