Date

Fri - 20.10.2017


rupert murdoch

Figures on readership behind the Times and Sunday Times digital paywalls have finally been released. 105,000 people have made some digital purchase, and about half of these are monthly subscribers to one of the digital editions: the websites or the Times iPad app or Kindle edition. "Many of the rest" said the press release "are either single copy or pay-as-you-go customers."

100,000 more print subscribers have activated their digital accounts either to the websites and/or iPad apps and the press release therefore concludes that the total paid digital audience is "close to 200,000." James Murdoch, News Corp's chairman and CEO for Europe and Asia said that this means that the "total paid circulation of The Times has grown."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 16:14

UK-based publishers Telegraph Media Group, Guardian Media Group and Trinity Mirror have put aside their differences in and partnered to petition Business Secretary Vince Cable, asking him to prevent Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. from embarking on a full takeover of satellite broadcaster BSkyB, MediaGuardian reported Monday.

The £8 billion takeover will grant Murdoch with a combined turnover of £7.5 billion. In addition to the newspaper firms, the petition letter was signed by BBC Director General Mark Thomson and Channel 4 Chief Executive David Abraham.

"If the two (News Corp and Sky) were combined, there might be a significant loss of plurality in our media market. (Vince) Cable, the relevant minister, will decide whether he wants to refer this. It's not that they've done anything wrong. It's just that there is a potential of an abuse of power," Thomson said, The Australian reported.

The acquisition will be filed for regulatory approval through the European Commission on the basis that it will function competitively. Once the EC is notified, Cable will have 10 days to make a decision and pass it through the country's current Prime Minister David Cameron.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-10-12 16:02

Rupert Murdoch's UK-based publishing group News International embarked on a multi-million pound advertising campaign beginning yesterday for its national Sunday tabloid paper News of The World (NOTW), MediaGuardian reported. The initiative, which touts the title's reputation for exclusive content, is being launched across outdoor and television platforms before a digital paywall is raised next month.

The TV ad, made by WCRS agency, includes the slogan "The Big Stories Start Here" and will strive to convince users that NOTW produces quality material. According to Brand Republic, the three-week long campaign will include some of the tabloid's biggest scoops, such as football team Chelsea's player John Terry's affair and Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson paying for access to her ex-husband Prince Andrew.

The paywall will incorporate a £1.99 (US$3.15) charge for a four-week subscription to online content, according to MediaGuardian. Users will have to pay £1 ($1.58) for a day's access while the iPad edition will cost £1.19 ($1.89) per week.

World-wide media and marketing company Mindshare was in charge of media handling and buying for the campaign, Brand Republic added.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 17:55

UK supermarket chain Asda and News International, the British arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., have announced a new deal that features the return of NI-owned The Sunday Times to 260 Asda stores, following a week-long disappearance, MediaWeek reported today.

NI recently increased the cover price of the weekend title by £0.20 to £2.20. Last week, the publisher decided that it would have £0.183 of the price increase while retailers just a little over 1 pence or £ 0.017, which constitutes 23.5 percent. Asda responded by claiming that it should have £0.5, or 25 percent of the cover price, as it previously did.

Asda pointed out that NI made an "acceptable proposal." However an NI official said that the publisher "sold to all retailers at the same price," MediaWeek informed. If thedeal did in fact go through, Asda's competitors such as Tesco, Sainsbury's and Morrisons might be suffering defeat, Media Week suggested.

NI owns The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of The World. According to the Guardian, the collective circulation of the titles amounts to 37 percent of the country's newspaper circulation. In 2009, The Times and The Sunday Times saw losses of nearly £87.7 million.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-28 00:16

Rupert Murdoch's The Sunday Times last weekend increased its cover price by 10 percent to £2.20, becoming the most expensive national Sunday newspaper in the United Kingdom, MediaWeek reported Friday.

This is the first increase in the past four years, when the cover price rose to £2.00, the Press Gazette reminded. However, News International said the price hike "is less than the rise in the retail prices index over that period," MediaGuardian quoted.

Despite The Sunday Times' move, competitors have maintained their cover prices. According MediaGuardian, The Observer costs £2, the Sunday Telegraph £1.90 and the Independent on Sunday £1.80.

Two days after the increase, British supermarket chain Asda decided to remove The Sunday Times from the shelves of its 260 stores "due to a dispute over the margin it receives for selling the title," MediaWeek informed.

According to the chain, News International is keeping 18.3p of the extra 20p of the cover price, lowering Asda's sales gain from 25 percent to 23.1 percent.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-21 18:10

Three months after the Fijian regime issued a decree ordering media outlets to be 90 percent owned by local citizens, News Limited agreed on Tuesday to sell The Fiji Times to Motibhai & Co, The Wall Street Journal reported.

"We are reluctant sellers of the Fiji Times, but I am delighted that we have been able to find a buyer who will take over the business as a going concern," News Ltd. Chairman John Hartigan said, Agence France-Presse quoted.

Motibhai & Co's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Mahendra Motibhai Patel, a Fijian businessman who had previously served in the newspaper board, said in statement published in the Fiji Times that the company was committed to "respect and enhanced" the legacy of the oldest daily in the country.

Although the terms of the sale were not made public, Patel said the name of the paper's publisher would be revealed in a week, Radio Australia reported. "We can't announce his name yet because we are going through the formalities. He is a very innovative person. He's well versed in journalism," he said.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-17 15:48

It is still unclear whether News International's paywall for The Times' and Sunday Times' is "working," as the paywall is just two months old, and the websites have not yet made statistics public.

In the Independent today, the tagline for Ian Burrell's article on Rupert Murdoch's much discussed paywall states: "advertisers don't like it. Analysts are unconvinced. The paywall at News International may not be winning many fans, but the man behind it is determined to keep it standing." But François Nel, director of the Journalism Leaders Programme at the University of Central Lancashire's School of Journalism, Media and Communication in the United Kingdom, and also an SFN research partner, crunched the numbers, and the result is that the paywalls may be doing better than most people think. A lot better.

When The Times was still subscribing to ABCe audits, data showed that in May 2009 monthly unique users were at 20,406,420.
So, as Nel elaborates with his "back-of-the-envelope calculations":

"Say they were making £0.20p £0.10p per user per month, mostly from advertising.

That would be 20,406,420 X 0.10p = £2,040,642 per month.

So, say they lost 90 per cent of their users and, say, 50 per cent of their advertisers got cold feet, too:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-09-02 23:53

Rupert Murdoch is pushing forward with his plans for a tablet computer-only digital newspaper, tapping Greg Clayman, currently head of digital distribution for Viacom, to serve as publisher, All Things Digital's Peter Kafka reported yesterday.

News Corp. is looking to spend US$30 million to $40 million on the project, paidContent confirmed today.

The publication does not yet have a name or launch date, but has also hired New York Post Executive Editor Jesse Angelo to head up the editorial side. "For some reason, News Corp. (NWS) people (who also own this site), don't like to use the word "newspaper" to describe their plans for the news...thing. But as earlier reports have detailed, the idea is to create a subscription-based digital news service, designed expressly for mobile platforms like Apple's (AAPL) iPad and Google's (GOOG) Android phones and upcoming tablets," Kafka noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-23 19:52

News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch has announced a new plan to launch a national U.S. digital newspaper, which will be made available exclusively on mobile phones and tablet computers, such as the iPad, the Los Angeles Times reported today.

No launch date has been set, but people familiar with the situation said it is likely to be unveiled before the end of the year. The new digital newspaper would directly compete with USA Today and The New York Times, offering general news and information through short stories that can be consumed quickly.

"We'll have young people reading newspapers," the News Corp. chief executive said during the company's earnings call Aug. 4, the Times quotes. "It's a real game-changer in the presentation of news."

The Atlantic's Derek Thompson pointed out today that the question to ask in this case is: what value would News Corp. derive from another digital publication?

"I have to say, I don't get it. Newspapers for mobile devices already exist. There's one called 'The New York Times,' and another called 'Washington Post,' and another called 'Wall Street Journal,' which I'm sure News Corp knows about, seeing as how they own it. All of those newspapers have apps for smart phones and smart pads that are quite good already. What value would another newspaper add?" he writes.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-08-13 22:25

"Tablets are a perfect platform for cheap, convenient and up-to-date News Corp content," Rupert Murdoch said at a media debate in Sydney Tuesday, Media Guardian reported.

"News Corp has "tens of thousands of readers" through apps for the Wall Street Journal, the Times and the Australian," Murdoch added. He then pointed out that Apple's iPad sales will exceed than predicted.

Murdoch said he think iPads will sell around 15 million this calendar year and more than 40 million by 2012. And is just one of many tablet or slate computers in the pipeline. News Corp fully intends to be across all those platforms too."

In addition, he claimed that subscriber levels for the new Times and Sunday Times online paywalls are strong and described the strategy as "the start of a new business model for the internet," but did not give any exact figures, Media Guardian reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-08-03 21:20

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation