Date

Thu - 23.11.2017


Relaunch

Just 10 weeks after start-up incubator Betaworks acquired its brand name and URL, the new-look Digg is celebrating its one-month anniversary.

Sporting a pared-down, picture-heavy, ad-free homepage, the site has been dubbed “a Pinterest for news links.” The voting algorithm that was a defining feature of Digg’s previous incarnation remains (though human editors also play a role in curating the site) and articles like "The Five Coolest (and 5 Strangest) Marvel Comics Foodstuffs" prove that its audience has lost none of its interest in the more bizarre elements of the news.

There are however clear signs that not everyone is diggin’ the new format. Initial reaction to the re-launched website lamented the loss of key Digg functions, and four weeks have done little to assuage such concerns. Despite being a central reason for Digg’s initial popularity, the old commenting system has disappeared and users are required to sign in via their Facebook account should they want to interact with articles.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-30 18:14

Big changes are taking place at Johnston Press, after the publisher’s CEO Ashley Highfield promised last March to make the company a “digital first” entity. “We’re going to flip the model from newspaper-first every day to digital-first, and you take the best and produce a bumper weekly in print. By 2020, that will be the model,” he told paidContent at the time.

In April, Johnston Press announced plans to re-launch all of its 170 paid-for titles – with the exception of The Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday, The News Letter and The Yorkshire Post – as “platform neutral” publications. As previously reported, the changes began with the decision to re-launch five Johnston Press daily papers - Northants Evening Telegraph, Northampton Chronicle and Echo, Halifax Courier, The Scarborough Evening News and Peterborough Evening Telegraph - as online publications with a weekly printed edition by the end of May.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-21 15:36

Glamour, the popular glossy magazine for women, is relaunching its Web site after completing an overhaul of its operations, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today. Like other recent news content relaunches, the new online version is aimed to be more cohesive with the print version, while also making the best of enhancements made possible by being digital.

"This redesign offers greater synergy with the tone and character of the print magazine, and will deliver on all the expectations of our readers, offering unbeatable fashion, shopping, beauty and hair content - no one will make style decisions without our help again!" Jo Elvin, editor of Glamour, owned by Condé Nast, told MediaWeek.
The changes introduced on the newly designed Web site include large scale visuals, eight content channels for fashion, shopping, beauty and hair, celebrity, style, blogs, introduction of an e-commerce element and a new section called "Do's and Don'ts."

"The release of this new version of Glamour.com highlights our ongoing programme of investment, including a significant increase in the editorial team," Emanuela Pignataro, country manager for the Condé Nast Digital Britain group told MediaWeek. The re-launch of Glamour.com marks the fourth significant investment by the group in just more than a year, beginning with redesign of Wired.co.uk in April 2009, soon followed by CNNtraveller.com at the end of last year and GQ.com in February.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-31 15:16

IT magazine Computerworld unveiled a new look on Monday, featuring a "clean, modern and functional design," a press release announced. The Web site's look is very basic, yet easy to maneuver.

Many publishers have recently set out to redesign their publications, in both print and online, to enhance reader and user experiences. These include Newsweek, thetimes.co.uk and sundaytimes.co.uk, Macleans and more.

When redesigning, thinking of the user experience is of utmost importance, newspaper design expert Juan Antonio Giner noted on his innovationsinnewspapers.com blog. Using the example of the Independent, he calls for "less hype, less spin and just the (graphic) facts, baby."

News should be "show, don't tell," and in print, front pages sitting in newsstands should be made irresistible to readers, Giner states, calling it "caviar journalism."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-28 17:11

The new Times and Sunday Times websites were launched today, offering a free preview for about a month before going behind a paywall in June. Already, users must register to go beyond the homepage.

As reported last week, the home pages of the new websites look more like their print counterparts and have a stronger multimedia focus. The Sunday Times in particular puts much emphasis on multimedia, leading the homepage with a large photo/video box and accompanying each story with a picture, as well as offering an index of multimedia galleries high up on the page. "We hope we've designed a site that focuses on showcasing that journalism in the cleanest and aesthetically pleasing way possible," said a Times staff member in a live chat.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-25 17:46

paidContent has published some 'sneak peaks' of the Times' new website, to be launched in June. TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk will replace Timesonline.co.uk and will be behind a paywall.

As paidContent noted, the new site looks more similar to the print edition than its predecessor did in terms of layout and its use of the print masthead. The lead story has a good deal of space on the home page. Another change is the introduction of an 'OpEd Live' section which allows readers to chat with the paper's columnists and opinion writers. PaidContent reported that readers will also be able to use TheTimes.co.uk to chat with other personalities via CoverItLive, though this is something that Times Online already does, in fact.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-19 19:39

South African Sunday newspaper City Press relaunched with a new look and more content yesterday, aimed at appealing to a larger mass audience, TheDailyMaverick.co.za reported.

The paper will celebrate its 30th birthday soon, with the newspaper announcing: "We've given ourselves a makeover to reflect our role in the 21st century and as an expression of our highest aspiration, which is to be South Africa's leading Sunday newspaper - a read of black excellence and one we want to make an essential in all South African homes."

The revamped print edition includes two new sections, one focused on arts and entertainment, called "Seven," and one section called "Voices," which showcases the writing of top authors and figures, such as Kofi Annan, Babalwa Shota, Piet Rampedi and more.

"City Press has always been a paper of black excellence, but we want to broaden our appeal and create new onramps for a wider readership," said Ferial Haffajee, editor of the City Press, according to DailyMaverick.

The new look was created by top newspaper consultant Peter Ong, who also redesigned Singapore's New Straits Times and the Sydney Morning Herald.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-03 23:45

South Africa's Cape Times plans to redesign and relaunch just before the World Cup takes place in June, GrubStreet.co.za reported.

"We're hoping to achieve a livelier product, taking into account media trends around the world and more partnership with online," Chris Whitfield, editor-in-chief of the Cape Times, told GrubStreet.

"We're looking at the way we write and the beats we cover and having more people in stories. The Cape Times can be fairly dry and we'd like a little bit more humour and levity," he said.

The Cape Times has a strong focus on politics and business, and Whitfield said he thinks a broader appeal with some marketing can beef up the editorial relaunch "aimed at producing a compelling newspaper."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-27 20:51

Following the revamp of Reuters' U.S. Web site in December last year with a cleaner, more advertiser friendly look, the news wire is set to restructure its free, open UK news site along similar lines, paidContent reported.

Reuters.co.uk is significantly dependent on advertising revenue, unlike many of its services that target business professionals with premium pricing. The redesigned advertiser friendly UK site plans to launch this week, and it is likely certain content elements will become paid, MediaWeek reported.

Having revamped its commercial operations over the last six to seven months and making some significant hirings during the period, "We started to organise the site around topics. By topics, you can create topics of advertiser interest - whether broad topics like foreign currency exchanges or narrow topics around the small business environment," Tim Faircliff, consumer media general manager of Thomson Reuters, told paidContent.

While maintaining current free news offerings and without ruling out the future possibilities of a paid model, Faircliff explained Reuters is "moving in to the ad-supported model with a nod to the fact that paid is part of the DNA of our organisation," according to paidContent. "We think it's sensible that you can pay for niche, high-value content."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-20 19:14

France-Soir, a historic title with its roots dating back to the French resistance, was re-launched today by Alexander Pugachyov, the son of Russia's most influential billionaire oligarchs, Business Week reported.

An extravagant 20 million euro have been invested in the newspaper's publicity efforts to announce the launch and claim a spot beside competitor titles like Le Parisien, Le Monde and Le Figaro, according to Business Week. The launch will see 500,000 printed copies at an initial price of 50 cents, which is exactly half the price of competing newspapers like Le Parisien and Aujourd'hui en France.

The newly launched title is more colourful, with an unchanged volume of 40 pages, Ennahar Online reported. Pugachyov told Ennahar Online that the paper will focus on exclusive photographs even if it's expensive.

Since its acquisition last year by the Russian oligarch for 50 million euro, the paper has been expanding its newsroom staff size from 40 journalists to 100, a spokeswoman for the newspaper told Business Week. She further added that the revamped title targets a daily circulation of 150,000 to 200,000 copies, and will eventually position France-Soir as the fourth largest national daily in the country.

The price of France-Soir may be increased to 70 cents in the future, Ennahar Online stated.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-18 05:15

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