Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


regulation

As the fallout continues over allegations of phone hacking and corruption at News International, Rupert Murdoch appeared before the Leveson Inquiry today to answer questions about his personal relationship with politicians and the political influence wielded by his UK newspapers.

Under the intense gaze of international media outlets, Murdoch told the inquiry that he had never used the reporting from his papers as a way to further his business interests. "I have never asked a prime minister for anything," Murdoch told the inquiry, also stating, "I take a particularly strong pride that we have never pushed our commercial interests in our newspapers."

With questions scrutinising his relationships with UK Prime Ministers as far back as Margaret Thatcher, the inquiry sought to establish whether the media mogul had undue political influence in the UK. Murdoch downplayed his political pull, saying for example that, “I met Mr. Blair, if you look at the record, an average of two, maybe three times in the same year.” He also stressed, "I, in 10 years he was in power, never asked Mr Blair for anything, nor did I receive any favours."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 17:52

What's the best way to ensure press standards while protecting press freedom?

This old chestnut has been preoccupying the media industry for some time and the question has come into particular focus as the Leveson Inquiry continues to examine press standards in Britain in the wake of the News of the World phone hacking scandal.

Speaking at the Leveson Inquiry yesterday, editor of the Daily Mail Paul Dacre advocated a new system of ensuring press standards by accrediting journalists.

Under the proposed system, news organisations and freelance agencies would have to voluntarily sign up to receive accreditation. Journalists convicted of serious misconduct would be struck off the list, much like doctors being struck off the Medical Register.

Described in the Daily Mail as "a badge of good journalism", an accredited press card would entitle journalists to attend, for example, government briefings, official press conferences and celebrity, sports and royal events.

Dacre stated: "The public at large would know the journalists carrying such cards are bona fide operators, committed to a set of standards and a body to whom complaints can be made."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-07 14:17

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