Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


reader feedback

by Jack Shafer

A little over five years ago, I announced that I was canceling my subscription to the New York Times. My cancellation wasn't in protest of Times coverage of the Middle East, ethnic minorities, religion, sex, or any of the other thousand hot-button issues that cause readers to kill their subscriptions. I was getting rid of my newsprint New York Times because the dandy redesign of NYTimes.com had made it a superior vessel for conveying the news.

Continue reading on Slate

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-08-24 17:28

The future of content appears to lie in the complex world of embracing all storytelling forms. New research suggests that multi-channel content distribution and marketing of both print and digital products are essential for reaching consumers who are now consuming both in nearly equal amounts.

Continue reading on Newspaper Next

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-20 09:33

In parts of Europe, online news sites are adopting measures to discourage readers from commenting because there are just too many posts for editorial staff to monitor.

Guest blogger Tomáš Bella reports on the problem and solutions like his own start-up business, Piano, which bundles media groups together behind a single paywall, allowing users to pay and log in once for access to many sites.

Continue reading on the BBC College of Journalism blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-11 10:54

Norway's Verdans Gang CEO Torry Pedersen kicked off WAN-IFRA's Readership Conference today in San Francisco by enumerating the multimedia company's focus on readers and users.

"Always a reader knows more than a reporter, always," Pedersen explained, saying that VG has found success inviting participation by readers, especially when big news happens.

For example:

- When the Icelandic ash cloud engulfed Europe and shut down air traffic, VG built a "Hitchhikers Central" website in seven hours, matching people who needed ground transportation with those who can drive them throughout Europe. More than 5,000 connections were made through this service.

- When the swine flu pandemic hit, VG produced a swine flu portal to provide swine flu background, and resources and vaccine information in each Norwegian community. The site received 1.7 million page views.

- VG is ramping up its connections with Facebook and Twitter. Pedersen said a large percentage of linking to stories starts on social networks. VG has attracted 160,000 fans in 18 different VG Facebook groups.

Author

Martha Stone

Date

2010-11-16 19:48

Forbes is planning to involve its readers more in both the print and digital versions of its magazine. Lewis DVorkin, chief product officer of Forbes Media, recently wrote about how "At Forbes, we're beginning to open up our print and digital platforms so many more knowledgeable and credible content creators can provide information and perspective and connect with one another," he said.

He noted that with the launch of this year's Forbes 400, reader content began to appear in the pages of the magazine. "What was yesterday's audience is today's cadre of potential experts who can report what they know or filter information for distribution to friends who trust their judgments," he wrote.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-05 15:19

The New Times is giving away LeBron James basketball jerseys to Miami's homeless population, just two months after the basketball star became the butt of jokes across the United States for his actions off the court, in which he created a national TV special to "dump his native region for Miami."

In Ohio, angry fans were pitching their LeBron gear, in some cases burning them in public. One man, Chris Jungjohann, founder of a project he calls "Break Up With LeBron," saw the waste, and collected the clothing and sent it to Miami for the homeless. The clothing was rejected by several agencies. "The general consensus was that it was an attempt to mock the homeless population," Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust chairman Ron Book told the New Times.

Image: The New Times
The New Times didn't want bureaucracy to get in the way of homeless people getting the clothing they needed, so staffers took it upon themselves to pass it out.

"Why wouldn't we want them? We're homeless," Darius Moore told the New Times. "I know they're old clothes, but it's the sentiment behind the garment. Somebody cares."

The New Times posted this video about giving out the clothing:

What role do you think newspapers have to play in community projects and charities?

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-01 13:43

Recent adjustments to their online commenting systems suggest that news organisations have been reevaluating the value of user-generated discussions as addenda to published articles.

The New York Times reported that in the next few months, The Washington Post plans to revise its comments policy in order to possibly give greater prominence to real names over anonymous posters. Many papers, including The New York Times and The Post, often require users to register before commenting.

Some publications, such as The Minneapolis Star Tribune, completely disable comments on sensitive stories; others like the Greensboro News & Record decide on a case-by-case basis which comments to post online. The Atlantic's Daily Dish simply bans all comments.

According to Poynter.org, The Huffington Post, The Economist and The Sacramento Press have all recently altered their approaches to moderating comments, in order to foster better dialogues on their Web sites.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-03 23:54

Aiming to make the Huffington Post more interactive and more social network friendly, the news site yesterday introduced "HuffPo Badges" to encourage interaction among readers, mediabistro.com reported today.

So what do the badges do?

Mediabistro's Alex Alvarez explains: "Basically, they function like a cross between Gawker's tiered, 'starred commenter' system and Foursquare badges. HuffPost badges are awarded based on user activity and interactivity, so, for example, those who regularly comment on the site or share stories across social networks like Twitter can receive a 'Superuser' badge. Readers who go through flagging inappropriate comments to feel some modicum of power as they sit in their sad little cubicles all day can earn 'Moderator' badges."
The Huffington Post quietly rolled out the badge system yesterday, and plans to add more badges in the future, according to an announcement on the site.

The move to use badges and try to engage users more through social networking "has helped make us a more dynamic and interesting site, while keeping the conversation more civil. HuffPost Badges highlights and rewards the people who power our growing community," said Arianna Huffington, according to mediabistro.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 00:09

The Boston Globe is working to keep its place as a portal into Boston with its launch of a new feature in the opinion section of its Web site, "The Angle: Stories Worth Talking About." The section gives readers an opportunity to get deeper insights on regional and national issues and encourages their participation in discussions on the news, Editor & Publisher reported.

"By bringing together articles with a strong discussion point from all areas of our reporting, The Angle will help our online readers to become more engaged in the issues and subjects of high interest to them and the community at large," Peter Canellos, editorial page editor of The Boston Globe, stated in a press release.

The Angle feature will highlight one particularly interesting story per day, while providing readers with a complete selection of current articles from the Globe's coverage that include local, national, international, business, arts and entertainment news and more, the press release stated.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-02 22:47

Google Wave - available only in experimental quantities yet - is already changing the way traditional publishers produce the news, Mashable reported Sunday. Because its interactive structure permits real-time dialogue with readers, Wave has prompted news editors to adjust budget lines to match public interest as it emerges throughout the day.

"It's a lot more live than Twitter because it's like you can see people typing and everybody gets to know each other," RedEye Web editor Stephanie Yiu was quoted as saying. "It's really about connecting with our readers on a new platform. We're learning with our readers and moving forward together."
RedEye is a Chicago Tribune free daily, and its blog describes itself as "print media rebooted and reborn," RedEye states on its Twitter site.

RedEye launched its first public wave on November 10, according to a blog post on that date inviting Google Wave previewers to participate. Apparently, though, other internal waves have been used as well as a forum for assigning stories and developing other content by publications experimenting with the new platform.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-23 16:35

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