Date

Sat - 21.10.2017


radio

Germany’s international broadcaster Deutsche Walle (DW) is using mobile phones to extend the reach of its "Learning by Ear" programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa. In a continent where Internet access is limited or non-existent, and many countries experience high levels of adult illiteracy, DW has teamed up with mobile phone operators, like Vodaphone in Tanzania, to bring its news service to a greater number of listeners.

Originally a radio series launched in 2008 and followed up with a podcast in 2010, "Learning by Ear" aims to give young people aged 12-20 an insight into subjects like the economy, health, politics and the environment. Through dramas, feature reports and in-depth news analysis "Learning by Ear" tackles issues pertinent to the continent’s teenagers, such as looking and applying for a job in Africa, HIV and AIDS information and a series on women’s rights.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-23 16:52

Radio audience measurement firm Rajar has found that in the United Kingdom, 8.1 million people - 16 percent of all adults - have downloaded podcasts, MediaGuardian reported today.

The survey also shows that 6.6 million people have listed to the radio on their smartphones, and 44 percent said they listen to a podcast at least once a week. Those who have downloaded a radio app have reached 2.2 million, a 57 percent increase in less than six months. In June, 1.4 million smartphone users said they had downloaded a radio app, Beehivecity noted.

"Listening to radio via smartphones has grown rapidly over the past year or so and this is reflected in the number of people who claim to have downloaded a radio app, which now stands at just over a quarter of smartphone owners," said Christel Swift, research manager for RAJAR, according to Radiotoday.co.uk.

Comedy and music are the most popular types of podcasts to download; however, just 24 percent of those who said they use podcasts have time to listen to everything downloaded each week, according to Beehivecity.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-15 22:26

Russian publishing house Kommersant will launch a TV channel that may be available on cable or the Web, Lenta.ru reported today. The channel's website outlined that it will focus on socio-political news content and that stories will "strictly" include only the facts and expert opinions.

RBC Daily wrote that Kommersant General Director Andrei Galiev confirmed the project will soon come to life and that the firm is looking into the various steps that should be taken to realise Kommersant TV. According to experts, initial investment in the project would have to be between US$2 million to $5 million, while the yearly budget must amount to $2 million, rg.ru noted.

David Shostak, operating director of video-gaming and computer channel Gameland TV, said that Internet TV currently has no real business model and that Web-based outlets as such serve to promote the channel and to gain extra audiences, as opposed to cable-based ones, which is where real monetization occurs.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-09-01 13:47

The Internet tops the list of the most influential mediums, accounting for more than 40 percent of influence points in the United Kingdom and Germany, and 37 percent in France, according to the Digital Influence Index Study 2008 by Fleishman-Hillard Inc. and Harris Interactive.

TV is ranked next. Radio, newspaper and magazines lag behind with less than 20 percent of the points, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

In terms of share of time, however, TV makes up the biggest section in the United Kingdom and Germany, while the Internet comes next and then radio.

Printed media - newspaper and magazines - only account for less than 10 percent share each in the three countries surveyed, much lower than the points in terms of share of influence, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-12 23:30

Cox Media Group Inc. announced on Wednesday the reorganisation of its media businesses that will see contribution to radio, television and newspaper content by the company's editorial staffers.

"This new concept is another step toward fulfilling Cox Media Group's vision of operating as a fully-integrated media company," Sandy Schwartz, president of Cox Media Group, stated in the announcement. "Sharing expertise and best practices across all of our media properties allows us to better serve consumers and advertisers in our changing environment. In addition, each of Cox's media properties will benefit from expanded shared services such as Research, Sales, Digital, Finance, Human Resources and Engineering."
The three separate mediums and their brand names will continue to operate independent news and editorial functions; however, the radio, television and newspaper networks will now share knowledge, talent and resources. Cox hopes the new model will result in increased operating efficiency and cost savings.

At present no jobs will be lost due to the reorganisation.

"We're creating a leadership model to better reflect the reality of today's media marketplace. As the boundaries between traditional and digital media merge, it's important to have leaders in place who can think broadly across the media landscape as they guide our way forward," added Schwartz.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-19 19:47

A Wales Labour Party Assembly Member (AM) has proposed the issuing of grants to start "super local" television and radio channels run by newspapers, the BBC reported Friday.

Huw Lewis said that it would not take a "huge amount of money" from the government to see Wales become a base for journalistic excellence.

Speaking at a Labour Party meeting in Flintshire, Lewis proposed the launch of 12 local digital television channels as an "arm's length" government body.

"You only have to look at examples like Channel M in Manchester to see that newspaper groups can run excellent and successful TV news and produce top quality programming," he said, according to the BBC.

The National Union of Journalists has labelled the Welsh newspaper industry as "in crisis," in a report to the National Assembly's broadcasting committee.

The assembly government has been requested to respond to Lewis's proposal.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-07-24 12:40

Four major players in French radio broadcasting will unite as Bureau de la radio, to "promote the medium and lobby government and advertisers," followthemedia.com reported Monday.

The four members, which own nearly all the national private radio channels, include RTL, NRJ Group, Lagardère Active and NextRadioTV.

The group would like to raise the ceiling on the 1994 ownership caps that were set to make sure that radio broadcasting did not get concentrated in a few hands. Radio Bureau is modelled on the American Radio Advertising Bureau, and replaces the Independent Trade Union of Private Radio Régies, according to followthemedia.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-24 09:00

Other than the BBC, UK commercial radio may be living out the last two decades of its existence, Claire Enders, founder of UK research service Enders Analysis, told the MediaGuardian Changing Media Summit Thursday, MediaGuardian reported.

Enders based her statement on the shift to online news dissemination and a sharp decline in offline advertising that have rendered many commercial radio stations unprofitable.

"There is a next generation of people in agencies who are not that keen on radio," she said, according to MediaGuardian. Radio was likely to end up solely in the form of "hobbyist" models, such as podcasts, she added.

Commercial radio failed to tap into the digital wave that is sweeping through the media business, said Matt Wells, head of audio for The Guardian.

However, Clive Dickens, the chief operating officer of Absolute Radio said that as long as the relationship between audience and the medium remained strong, and radio companies diversified their revenue sources, they would continue to thrive.

Based on the failure of early digital radio developed by the Times of India Media group, he said that the sector had still not understood the fact that audiences wanted more choices, not upgraded technology. BBC was delivering in this regard and is a space to watch, he said, according to MediaGuardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-20 10:50

Only less than 20 percent of British people said they trust newspapers, down from about three out of 10 last year. The figure was also below the global average, according to the report, the 10th annual Edelman Global Trust Barometer, published Tuesday, Press Gazette reported.

The study surveyed more than 4,500 college-educated adults who are interested in news. It found that those between ages 25 to 34 trust traditional media even more than those ages 35 to 64.

However, the UK's overall trust in the press media declined in the past year. Only 19 percent of UK respondents said they trust newspapers, down from 29 percent one year previously. The global average is 34 percent, Press Gazette reported.

Television, on the other hand, was trusted as a news source by one third, while radio was at 33 percent, down from 53 percent.

The Edelman report interviewed people by phone in 20 countries over a six-week period in November and December. In the United Kingdom, the level of trust in the media as an institution was the lowest, at 28 percent.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-01-28 20:21

Job cuts across the U.S. newspaper industry will impact the depth and quality of the country's radio and television news reporting, Deseret News editor and writer Lynn Arave pointed out in a column Friday.

While radio and TV stations usually have their own journalists covering news events, they usually do not have the extensive reporting staff that newspapers do, which is part of the reason they gather "significant" quantities of material from papers, as well as wire services like the Associated Press, Arave wrote.

Additionally, as a response to the advertising slump, all three sectors are attempting to do "more with less," he stated in his Salt Lake City-based Deseret News Radio dial column.

"Listen to almost any local morning radio show and you will hear radio news reports spurred by newspaper stories. It happens at times on TV, too," Arave stated.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2008-12-12 11:07

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