Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


publishing

In the digital age, are things looking good or gloomy for magazines? Economist brand platforms – which themselves represents a highly successful weekly magazine – argued both positions last week.

An article from The Economist’s print edition stated that magazine publishing has recently been suffused with a “new sense of optimism.” Most magazines rely less on classified advertising than newspapers, argues the piece, so they took less of a hit when the market moved online. They are capable of inspiring reader loyalty that is attractive to advertisers, continues the article, and they are harnessing digital technology in innovative ways.

The story acknowledges that the number of ad pages in US magazine has fallen for the third quarter running, but it asserts that digital advertising is an important growing market. “Once, digital ads would have been scant comfort. On the web they are typically worth a small fraction of what they were in print. But tablets, such as Apple’s iPad, could change this,” states the article, “there are signs that advertisers are accepting higher rates on tablets than on the web, because magazines on tablets are more like magazines in print: engrossing, well-designed experiences instead of forests of text and links.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-06-11 14:14

Big changes are taking place at Johnston Press, after the publisher’s CEO Ashley Highfield promised last March to make the company a “digital first” entity. “We’re going to flip the model from newspaper-first every day to digital-first, and you take the best and produce a bumper weekly in print. By 2020, that will be the model,” he told paidContent at the time.

In April, Johnston Press announced plans to re-launch all of its 170 paid-for titles – with the exception of The Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday, The News Letter and The Yorkshire Post – as “platform neutral” publications. As previously reported, the changes began with the decision to re-launch five Johnston Press daily papers - Northants Evening Telegraph, Northampton Chronicle and Echo, Halifax Courier, The Scarborough Evening News and Peterborough Evening Telegraph - as online publications with a weekly printed edition by the end of May.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-21 15:36

With the rise of digital technology, and the decline of print, is publishing even a business any more? Digital media guru Clay Shirky, quoted in a recent article by Mathew Ingram for GigaOm, suggests maybe not.

“Publishing is going away. Because the word ‘publishing’ means a cadre of professionals who are taking on the incredible difficulty and complexity and expense of making something public,” writes Shirky in an article for the social reading service Findings.com. ‘That’s not a job anymore. That’s a button. There’s a button that says “publish,” and when you press it, it’s done.”

Shirky continues that, in the past “we had a class of people called publishers because it took special professional skill to make words and images visible to the public. Now it doesn’t take professional skills. It doesn’t take any skills. It takes a WordPress install.”

In his article commenting on Shirky’s piece, Ingram points out that the statement is a “bit disingenuous.” He argues that, in fact, publishing books, magazines and newspapers normally requires more sophisticated tools than a blog platform.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-13 16:50

Fairfax Media has been publishing newspapers in Australia since before there was an Australia – so making the change from a newspaper company to a multimedia company is no easy matter.

But there isn’t any choice, says Jack Matthew, Chief Executive Officer for Australia-based Fairfax’s Metro Media, the keynote speaker at Publish Asia. Not because of audience decline – it has actually increased – but because the revenue model has changed.

Print audience is declining, but, thanks to digital media, the overall audience grew 30 per cent over the past five years, he said.

“We don’t have a content problem. More people consume our content today than ever have in the past,” he said. “What we have is a business model problem.”

Like a lot of media companies, Fairfax faces the “print dollars, digital cents” conundrum – the revenues that come from digital advertising and audiences is not replacing those lost to print.

Mr Matthew believes Fairfax has come up with a solution: maintain quality journalism as the “secret sauce” as the core of the business, but change the way of looking at the audience.

He believes that only by changing the traditional metric based on circulation to one based on overall audience can newspaper companies succeed – “not talking about platforms but talking about eyeballs.” He said the goal is to “sell targeted eyeballs across all platforms in a highly engaged atmosphere”.

“That won’t only protect your yield, it will grow your yield,” he said.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-11 09:31

The Daily celebrates its first birthday today. When News Corp launched its tablet-only daily news publication on February 2, 2011, many in the industry had high hopes.

"News Corp. is redefining the news experience with The Daily. We think it is terrific and iPad users are really going to embrace it," said Steve Jobs, Apple's late CEO, at the time.

One year on, Josh Sternberg at Digiday has published an article about how The Daily has faired so far. At first, the answer seems to be that The Daily's first year has been bumpier than expected.

"There's been no shortage of critics of The Daily," writes Sternberg, "It's too expensive. It lacks a voice. The technology, at least initially, was wonky. It had several staff shakeups. And most of all, it hasn't proven itself a viable as a standalone business."

Rupert Murdoch said last February that The Daily needed 500,000 subscribers to make it 'viable'. It currently has a fraction of that: 100,000 paid subscribers and 250,000 monthly readers, according to Sternberg's article.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-02 13:12

"No comment".

Business executives had become more and more adept at hiding behind this phrase, argues David Carr of The New York Times in an article published on Sunday. Not only that, but major figures in business are often obscured by "communications" teams that are anything but communicative. But now, suggests Carr, "Twitter has the potential to cut past all that clutter".

Carr writes that thanks to Twitter "there's a chance to get a glimpse into the thinking of otherwise unapproachable executives, and sometimes even have a real dialogue with them".

He uses Rupert Murdoch as an example. The News Corp executive joined the microblogging platform at the very end of last year, and has since made the headlines several times with Tweets that Carr calls "devoid of nuance, partisan in the extreme and prone to crankiness, all consistent with the Rupert Murdoch we have come to know".

Murdoch has used the platform to take sides on divisive issues. He voiced his strong support of SOPA and attacked President Obama for not supporting it, tweeting: "So Obama has thrown in his lot with Silicon Valley paymasters who threaten all software creators with piracy, plain thievery."

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-31 15:37

The Bangkok Post published today a 3D newspaper to celebrate its 64th anniversary, becoming the first daily in Thailand to produce an edition of this kind, The Star reported.

"You may be surprised to find the colors blur into each other in some photos, but you'll be amazed and fascinated when you see them through special 3D viewer glasses distributed free with the newspaper," The Bangkok Post explained in an article published in its front page.

Photo: The daily's front page shows a 3D-picture of a woman looking at Bua Sawan flowers

The special photos are spread through the 40 pages of the English-language daily. However, the text remained in its regular format.

The three-dimensional effect was also applied to the advertisements and to a special section called Our Pride, published in celebration of the newspaper recently winning the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers' (WAN-IFRA) Best Overall Design award in Asia-Pacific and Middle East, the Economic Times revealed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-06 16:19

The Italian government has extended its provision within the Media and Wiretapping Bill, "obbligo di rettifica", or rectification obligation, a law dating back to 1948 that requires newspapers or anyone "responsible for informative websites" to publish corrections, and passed a new law aimed at restraining online freedom of speech under the Berlusconi leadership, TheInquirer.net reported.

This law requires Italian bloggers, podcasters and users of social networking sites like Facebook to rectify "incorrect facts" published, and post corrections within 48 hours of receipt of complaint. Any failure to abide by the law within the timeline provided would result in the imposition of a fine of up to €25,000 to be paid by the author or publisher.

Image: Italian President Berlusconi
The European Digital Rights (EDRI), a pan-European coalition of online civil liberties advocacy organisations, and Italian journalists who call this bill "authoritarian" warn that it might darken much of the Italian cyberspace comprising of small-scale bloggers, website owners and users who comment on discussion pages, as they will be left with little or no time to deal with complaint requests and publish corrections within the time span allotted, EUObserver.com reported today.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-07-30 20:14

After a large part of its funding was cut, the Michigan Catholic, one of the oldest newspapers in Detroit, has been forced to reduce its publication to every two weeks and has had to cut half of its staff, the Detroit Free Press reported yesterday.

"The move comes after the Archdiocese of Detroit eliminated the newspaper's [US]$250,000 annual subsidy. It's part of an overall reduction in staffing levels that have taken place in the archdiocese over the past year," the daily explained.

The revenues from advertising and subscriptions, which were roughly $1 million, were not enough to keep the weekly publication going.

"When we looked at the numbers, we really didn't have a choice," Ned McGrath, director of communications for the archdiocese, told the Detroit Free Press.

The Michigan Catholic was founded 1872 and it currently has a circulation of 22,000 copies.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-08 16:00

Thomson Reuters announced its acquisition of leading Brazilian publishing house Revista dos Tribunais on Monday, according to the press release posted on PRNewswire.com.

This move is aimed at providing a "strategic opportunity" for the Reuters group to lead the Brazilian legal information market by offering advanced information, software and online services, btobOnline.com reported.

The legal industry in Brazil has by far been reliant on print resources for information and this acquisition brings Reuters "tremendous advantage in the emerging Brazilian legal information market by providing an all-in-one service that will give Brazilian professionals quick access to the most accurate legal content available. Revista dos Tribunais brings a strong local brand, high-caliber content and authors, and deep customer relationships that will help build our online business in Brazil," Gonzalo Lissarrague, senior vice president of Latin America for Thomson Reuters Legal, stated in the press release. Lissarrague will now oversee combined operations of the legal groups.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-20 23:10

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