Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


printing plant

by Dean Roper

The Thompson family, owner of the Globe and Mail in Canada, turned many heads in the industry in 2008 when it signed a 1.7 billion-Canadian dollar deal with its printing partner Transcontinental to print the national daily until 2028.

"They believed that there was much more to come from print when everybody else, especially south of the border, was saying it was dead," says Phillip Crawley, CEO of the Globe and Mail. Mr. Crawley spoke at the WAN-IFRA Printing Summit 2011 Conference in Mainz, Germany.

Ever since that momentous day, Crawley says he etched the date of 1st October 2010 into the cortexes of Globe and Mail staff, the day the company would relaunch its newspaper in grand style.

At the core of the multi-platform launch was a completely redesigned newspaper, leveraging the capabilities of the new presses (KBA Commander CT triple-wides) that were bought and installed at Transcontinental, which has printed the Globe and Mail since 1995.

"The day those presses started up in October in Toronto was one of the most exciting days of my career," says Crawley.

With the relaunch, the Globe and Mail introduced new print products, especially for the weekend, such as Globe Life and Globe Style, incorporating different newsprint, glossy paper and covers, semi-commercial and more.

The results in six months since the launch are startling, he says:

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-07 17:20

by Dean Roper

When 85 percent of their revenues come from print, says Kasturi Balaji, Managing Director of Kasturi & Sons in India, newspapers had better not scrimp on offering the best newspaper products to their readers. Mr. Balaji spoke at the WAN-IFRA Printing Summit 2011 Conference in Mainz, Germany.

Based in Chennai, Kasturi & Sons are the publishers of The Hindu, an English-language daily newspaper with a circulation of 1.5 million copies, and Business Line with 180,000 circulation, among other titles.

The company prints at 15 print sites, 12 of them owned by Kasturi & Sons, and three use heatset technology to print newspaper titles. That is what sets the company apart.

Since 1998, Kasturi & Sons have printed most of their newspaper products on double-width presses, many equipped with hot-air dryers. The company offers a number of niche, high-quality semi-commercial products, all bringing in significant new revenue streams.

For that new revenue, there are press-related and mailroom issues to consider, Mr. Balaji says. For the press, quality, formats and enhancements play major roles. But warning about quality, he says, "It is important to be realistic about quality expectations. Adding a dryer to a newspaper press does not make it a commercial press. While it may be somewhat easier to retrofit devices like stitchers and gluers, the same cannot be said for hot-air dryers, for example."

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-07 17:02

The Daily Mail & General Trust is to relocate its printing operation to a new greenfield site in Essex.

It would allow the company to upgrade its printing presses and, it says in a statement on its website today, "to reconfigure them more efficiently."

Continue reading on the Greenslade Blog

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-01 18:06

Ireland's oldest provincial newspaper, the Limerick Leader and Limerick Chronicle, have announced a review of the newspaper's printing operations in Limerick. If the proposals are implemented, the facility could be closed by mid-December and 29 people would be laid off, the Limerick Leader reported yesterday.

The staff has taken a 40 percent pay cut and opted for a three day week to keep the printing plant in operation, according to a report by RTE. The Unite trade union that represents the workers at the plant will be meeting with the management of Johnston Press, which owns the newspaper, in the coming days to explore alternative possibilities to closure or to secure a fair redundancy deal.

The company has said it will make "every effort to minimise the impact of this proposal on affected staff through, where possible, by re-deployment to alternative positions in the group," David Crow, divisional managing director of print for Johnston Press, told the Limerick Leader. "Despite the best efforts of the staff and management at Leader Print Limited, the unprecedented reductions in printing requirements across the industry has resulted in the company having to review its operations in Limerick."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-10 16:27

The deadline for the Los Angeles Times front page has been moved up five or more hours, to 6 p.m., because the Times is closing its Orange County printing plant and has sold its print run time slot at the remaining plant to the Wall Street Journal, Sharon Waxman reported for The Wrap yesterday. The Tribune Co.-owned Times print run used to be 11 p.m. and midnight.

Because of the change, breaking news will now appear in another section of the paper, and 80 people from the pressroom will be laid off. Eddy Hartenstein, publisher of the Times, wrote in a memo to staff that the change is being made to "further streamline our operations and reduce print production costs."

The Times is also cutting its stand-alone Business section on Mondays and will place them in the main news section, as well as move its Food section to Thursdays, so weekend subscribers will receive it and to help boost food-related ad revenue, such as restaurant ads.

The Times reported that late-breaking news will be published in a new section called LATExtra, which will begin appearing Feb. 2 on Mondays through Saturdays. The width of the paper will also be smaller, from 48 inches to 44 inches.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-08 23:41

The Australian was printed for the first time in Tasmania on Monday, Pro Print Australia reported Tuesday. The News Limited-owned paper was produced on a local press in the state for the first time, as the company put its new $32 million printing operation in Hobart's Technopark into action.

Since the newspaper's launch in 1964, the island state has been served by air-freight from Melbourne. The cost savings through local printing will allow News Limited to drop the cover prince from $1.90 to $1.50 and making home delivery much more accessible, The Australian reported Monday.

The Weekend Australian will be produced in Hobart beginning Sept. 5.

"We think this is a great move for readers and should increase circulation," Editor Paul Whittaker said, according to The Australian. "No longer will our readers be subject to the vagaries of the weather, and in particular fog, which often delays the arrival of papers from Melbourne into Launceston and Hobart for many hours.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-18 18:11

Newsquest will shut the Brighton Argus' printing plant, calling into question the future of 53 employees, who are currently in a consultation period set to last for 30 days, the Guardian.co.uk reported.

Printing for the Argus will be moved 55 miles away from the Brighton plant to one in Southampton. This will be the second printing facility that Newsquest closes after shutting a plant in Colchester last year.

An epected 21 employees will be laid off from the "prepress staff" who work on design and checking editorial pages before the paper goes to print.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-16 08:21

Hamsworth Printing's plant in Bristol will close this week, resulting in the loss of 88 jobs HoldtheFrontPage.co.uk reported.

Northcliffe Media, whose titles were printed at the plant, will now move operations to their plant in Didcot, 40 miles away from the Bristol site. Two of Northcliffe's titles, the South Wales Evening Post and the Metro editions serving Southern and South Western Wales will be printed in either Cardiff or Birmingham.

The decision to shut the plant down came after a four week "consultation period" that resulted in the decision to shut the plant and lay off 88 employees.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-04 10:05

The Bellingham Herald's parent company, McClatchy Co., has sold the Washington newspaper's building for US$2.35 million, the Herald reported.

The sale was finalised Tuesday, when two Bellingham investors from Herald Building LLC purchased the six-story building. Bob Hall, one of the directors of the company, said the neon Herald logo on top of the building will stay put.

Glen Nardi, publisher and president of the Herald, said the paper's employees will see no "noticeable changes," as the paper has signed a five-year lease with the new owners and will keep its regular offices located on the first and second floors of the building.

Plans to move the newspaper's printing operations to a plant in the nearby town of Mount Vernon will take effect in late summer.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-06-03 08:06

Horton Media is set to buy rival Auckland printing company, Business Media Press, combining Auckland's two independent community newspaper printers, and resulting in 15 lost jobs, the National Business Review reported on Tuesday.

Mathew Horton, chief executive of Horton Media, said that the purchase would provide financial security for more than 100 independent publishers. However, Horton also added the acquisition would see the staff base reduced from 22 to 7, as the press is reduced to a night shift only.

BMP director and co-owner Reay Neben said the sale would allow the business to prioritise the group's publishing interests, according to the NBR.

Brian and Reay Neben, former owners of the press, will continue to participate as part owners of Times Newspapers Ltd. Times is also owned by Fairfax Media, which will continue to print its community papers at the BMP press. These titles include, The Howick and Pakuranga Times and The Howick and Botany Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-19 14:30

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