Date

Sun - 19.11.2017


Print advertising

Remember when print ads could only play video? Now they can broadcast live tweets.

One thousand copies from Time Inc. magazine Entertainment Weekly’s next print run on October 5 will contain an Internet-connected ad, embedded inside two stiff sheets of paper.

The CW Television Network is behind the promotional insert, which will use an Android-powered device with a 3G cellular radio to display looping video and a live Twitter stream (the six latest tweets posted to the @CW_Network) on a mini LCD screen.

The experiment is all about branding. “It’s important advertisers know they can come to us when they want to do something that’s new, that’s never been done before,” Rick Haskins, Executive Vice President of Marketing and Digital Programmes at The CW, told Mashable.

The ad may sound nifty on paper, but whether it heralds a renaissance in print advertising is not yet certain; the following Mashable video reveals it to be slow, silent, lacking in tactility and comparable to a singing Hallmark card.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-03 12:03

That is the message global media consultants Simon-Kucher & Partners is hoping to send to news publishers, with a report that makes the case for significant increases in newspaper cover prices.

Price hikes are frequently seen as tangible proof of a newspaper’s declining fortunes, a desperate attempt on editors’ parts to combat dwindling revenue. Take for example Jeff Jarvis’s reaction to the NYTimes’s decision to raise the price of its print edition by 25 percent, from $2 per copy to $2.50. Jarvis doubted the viability of such a move, believing that it aimed to “support an outmoded economic model.” Newspapers, he argued, have lost much of their pricing power as online content puts paid to the advertising models that once made newspapers a powerful economic force. Jarvis’s reflections on the impact digital has had on newspaper ad revenue is valid in the main, but his assertion that increasing cover prices is an exercise in futility finds a counter-argument in SKP’s recent study.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-03 16:07

Freesheet Metro in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal came wrapped in a glossy ad from fashion retailer H&M Canada today. H&M is the first such retailer to create a glossy wrap for Metro, a press release stated.

Printed on glossy paper, the wrap shows readers what the retailer's newest guest designer, Lanvin, has created for the autumn/winter 2010 collection. Online, metronews.ca today also was taken over by H&M on its homepage and style section, as well as an expandable video.

The print initiative was planned by media agency Mediacom, in partnership with Metro Canada.

For the full press release, click here:
Press Release - Metro and HM.pdf

Here is what Metro's homepage looked like today:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-19 17:06

U.S. newspaper advertising revenue dropped 5.6 percent in the second quarter, but the decline rate has slowed down, according to the latest figures published by the Newspaper Association of America.

Overall spending in the second quarter was down from $6.82 billion to $6.44 billion year-over-year. Print ad revenue declined 7.6 percent to $5.6 billion, while online spending was up 14 percent to $743.9 million, and now represents 12 percent of total newspaper ad revenues, Media Buyer Planner reported.

Newspaper ad revenue has declined for 16 quarters in a row, but the 5.6 percent drop in the second quarter was an improvement - compared to 9.7 percent decrease in the first quarter and 23.7 percent decline in the fourth quarter of 2009, according to the AFP article posted on Google News.

"Despite a highly competitive environment, online advertising growth rebounded back into double digits, while declines in traditional revenue categories continue to moderate as the general advertising recovery progresses," said John Sturm, chief executive officer of the NAA, in a statement.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-08 22:51

Ad revenue at U.S. newspapers was down 10 percent to US$6 billion in the first quarter, from $6.6 billion in the same period in 2009, according to the data released by the Newspaper Association of America.

It was the smallest drop since late 2007, according to the Associated Press article posted on USA Today.

Compared to $11.1 billion ad revenue in the first quarter four years ago, the newspaper industry is now 46 percent loss, the AP reported.

Although still in decline, the trend in the first quarter indicated that the misery should not last much longer - the year-over-year declines in ad revenue have eased in the last three quarters.

NAA also shows U.S. newspapers reported their first gain in online ad sales, up 4.9 percent to $730.4 million, while print advertising plunged 11 percent to $5.25 billion, according to the Bloomberg article posted on Business Week.

Internet ad sales had been a sweet spot for newspapers, which grew 30 percent or more since 2004.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-27 23:35

When it comes to getting a brand message to the public, growing digital spaces, like social media, are exciting new channels, and using them correctly is important - "correctly" being the key word, a new campaign by Sweden's Dagens Industri points out.

The newspaper, Scandinavia's largest business daily, has created a "cautionary tale" of what can happen when a media outlet works too hard to deliver brand messages on just one platform, the Newspaper Marketing Agency Ltd. reported. Dagens Industri's video, posted on YouTube, is an entertaining take on how to keep it all in perspective.

To watch the video on the Dagens Industri site, click here.
To watch it on YouTube, click here.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-25 19:43

The Advertising Practitioners Council of Nigeria's Advertising Standard Panel last week announced it will sanction print media that publish unregistered advertisements, allAfrica reported.

ASP made the announcement while on a tour of print media outlets in Lagos. The group said only registered advertisements bearing certificates of approval by APCON will be allowed to publish in the print media.

The newly-constituted Advertising Standard Panel of the APCON was established to ensure that only safe and certified advertisements are published, according to allAfrica.

Flora Archibong, of the Newspapers Properietors Association of Nigeria, said the APN will help print media to better regulate the content of adverts, just as the Broadcasting Organisation of Nigeria helps to regulate broadcast.

"...we, on our part, cannot sit by and watch the business fall into disrepute. So as a matter of necessity, we will soon embark on the shutting down of some advertisements that are not approved," she said, according to allAfrica. "...henceforth any advertisement that is not carrying the 'Certificate of Approval' stamp by the ASP will be sanctioned as well as the newspaper that publishes it. We have to sanitize the industry. We have to sanitize the business of advertising for our good."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-22 18:58

News International Commercial has launched outdoor and print advertisements that aim to show the power of newspapers and magazines, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today.

The ads are based on research from Microsoft Advertising, which in December stated that for large retailers, print advertising is more effective than online ads, and more than twice as effective as television ads. Each £1 spent on print ads garner £5 in revenue, while TV and Internet ads bring in £2.15 and £3.44, respectively.

The News International ads state "For every £1 spent on advertising by retailers, newspapers and magazines deliver £6.41 in sales - more than any other media and 164% greater than TV."

The campaign will run across all News International titles for two weeks, beginning yesterday in The Sunday Times, according to a press release.

Participants of the Microsoft survey of 26 large UK retailers were anonymous, but included fashion retailers, department stores, large grocery retailers and big clothing stores. Twenty-four of the participants were "in the top 100 UK companies" when it comes to media expenditure.

News International is the main UK subsidiary of News Corporation. It publishes The Times, The Sunday Times, The Sun and News of the World.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-08 23:58

Topical advertising that links a brand with the day's news can be a powerful connection for consumers, the UK Newspaper Marketing Agency announced this week. It is also a good example of print's benefits, persuade potential clients of the benefits of the print medium, MarketingWeek reported Monday.

Maureen Duffy, CEO of the NMA, was quoted by Marketing Week as saying, "Given that newspapers are all about the here and now, it's surprising that more advertisers don't run newsy ads," Maureen Duffy, CEO of NMA told MarketingWeek. "Newspaper readers really notice ads that make clever connections between the brand and the news. The best topical ads get talked about, they become part of the story."

A Microsoft Advertising study on 26 leading UK retailers seems to support NMA's claim. It found that every £1 spent on print ads yields £5 in revenue, compared with £2.15 for TV and £3.44 for online, The Times Online reported Dec. 28.

"Print is very good for targeting specific audiences and getting eyeballs on key products, but the smarter businesses are integrating digital advertising into the planning process," Joel Dawson, head of Online Marketing at Boots, told The Times.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-13 23:57

Australian job advertisements, including print and online, were up strongly in November, according to a survey by Australia and New Zealand Banking Group released Monday, Reuters reported.

The study showed total job ad market increased 5.2 percent in November, much healthier than the 1.7 percent dip in October, and the 34.2 percent decline one year ago.

The number of job advertisements in major metropolitan papers climbed 8.3 percent, while those online were up 5.0 percent, according to the Reuters article posted on Asia One.

"The lift in newspaper job advertising is particularly encouraging, given that this sector tends to lead overall job advertising trends," Warren Hogan, acting chief economist at ANZ, said. "Employment growth is also now trending upwards, after contracting through the first half of 2009."

In general, average job advertisements totaled 140,658 per week in November. 9,530 of them came from newspapers and the rest from the Internet. The figures grew 2.3 percent in November, up for the sixth consecutive month, Reuters reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-08 21:51

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