Date

Mon - 20.11.2017


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“Starting a print newspaper in an emerging market can be profitable,” said William Pike, CEO of Kenya’s The Star . It is a lot of hard work, he said, but from its foundations in 2007, The Star is now the third paper in the Kenyan market and has made a small profit.

Many say that as mobile adoption rises in Africa, it will threaten print, as online has in many other countries, but Pike thinks this view should be seen with a critical eye. He was speaking at the 19th World Editors Forum in Kiev last week.

“We believe that there is still a great market in print,” he continued, with just one paper published per 140 people in the country (in comparison to one per two in markets where readership is highest.) Young people still want to read newspapers, and he highlighted research that showed that more 18-34 year olds read newspapers than go on the internet, or listen to CDs. TV and radio still provide a larger threat than digital.

The Star is a subsidiary of Radio Africa, which operates both Kiss FM and Classic FM in Kenya. Its aim is to be low-cost but high-quality. It breaks big, hard-hitting stories that have an impact on the community, and Pike cited this as an essential quality for success for a new paper. It is also important to be analytical with good op-eds, he said.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-13 16:01

A healthy rise in online and mobile advertising revenue in 2012 and 2013 will more than compensate for the steep losses facing the traditional publishing sector, predicts a new report by Media buying network GroupM.

The group, which calls itself "the world's number one media investment management operation," estimates that Britain's overall advertising market will grow sluggishly this year and next, with only moderate help from the London Olympic Games.

Digital high jump

The UK is recognized as a world leader in digital ad spending as a percent of total media, and the upward trend looks set to continue into 2013, according to GroupM futures director Adam Smith. “Digital spending growth already represents a quarter of the entire UK marketing economy, and it continues to grow,” he said on the GroupM website.

The report predicts that digital advertising spending will jump by 11 percent between this year and next, surpassing £5.3 billion ($8.3 billion) by the end of 2012, and reaching £6 billion ($9.4 billion) in 2013.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-03 15:42

Like many media companies, the Telegraph in the United Kingdom is developing its digital business in many directions – mobile, tablets, video, subscriptions, data -- all at the same time.

“Do yourself a favour, the first area you need to transform is the technology area,” says Allan Marshall, a consultant who is helping the Telegraph make the transformation.

Mr Marshall, Joint Principal of Australia-based iMedia Advisory, is a strong advocate of outsourcing technological needs. “If anyone says you have to have the technology development in-house, I’m sorry, but they’re taking you back to the past,” he says.

Outsourcing the technological solutions will reduce personnel, save money and allow you to do more at once, he says.

“The days of having technology in-house means you were restricted,” he says. “If the team was focused on a major project, all other projects were put aside.”

“You need to work with outside partners – it will save you money. You’ll get arguments from the IT department, but it doesn’t hold water.”

Mr Marshall’s wide-ranging presentation of The Telegraph’s current digital transformation illustrated just how quickly the news media world is changing.

“It’s all about information and data being at the heart of what we do,” said Mr Marshall. “You need to look at a clear strategy, focused at the customer. And if you don’t do that, you’re in trouble. You also have to look at your quality.  Focus on quality, and give the audience what they want.”

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-13 09:26

Fairfax Media has been publishing newspapers in Australia since before there was an Australia – so making the change from a newspaper company to a multimedia company is no easy matter.

But there isn’t any choice, says Jack Matthew, Chief Executive Officer for Australia-based Fairfax’s Metro Media, the keynote speaker at Publish Asia. Not because of audience decline – it has actually increased – but because the revenue model has changed.

Print audience is declining, but, thanks to digital media, the overall audience grew 30 per cent over the past five years, he said.

“We don’t have a content problem. More people consume our content today than ever have in the past,” he said. “What we have is a business model problem.”

Like a lot of media companies, Fairfax faces the “print dollars, digital cents” conundrum – the revenues that come from digital advertising and audiences is not replacing those lost to print.

Mr Matthew believes Fairfax has come up with a solution: maintain quality journalism as the “secret sauce” as the core of the business, but change the way of looking at the audience.

He believes that only by changing the traditional metric based on circulation to one based on overall audience can newspaper companies succeed – “not talking about platforms but talking about eyeballs.” He said the goal is to “sell targeted eyeballs across all platforms in a highly engaged atmosphere”.

“That won’t only protect your yield, it will grow your yield,” he said.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-11 09:31

Sunday is not a day of rest when it comes to newspaper sales in the US. The newly published annual Pew report on the state of the American media has highlighted that despite the problems that print newspapers are facing in the US, Sunday print editions are continuing to do relatively well. Sunday circulation has stabilised and has even gone up at some papers. What’s more, Pew writes that as print ad revenues plummet, Sunday preprint insert advertising has proved comparatively resilient.

Presumably to capitalise on this trend, the Wall Street Journal has established a partnership with 62 local papers, which each weekend publish between two and four pages of content about business and personal finance produced by WSJ writers. Jeff Roberts writes for paidContent that the articles are not reproduced from the Journal, but written specifically to target a wider, lower-earning audience.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-20 17:06

The news industry is transitioning from print to digital, and nobody said it was going to be easy. For one thing, many news publications still simply make more money from the shrinking paper side of their business than from the growing digital end. But as newspapers struggle to make the switch, perhaps part of the problem isn’t financial; it’s that newrooms are hooked on print. 

This is the argument made by two recent articles, one published by Nieman Lab, the other by Poynter, which suggest that journalists have been struggling to prioritise digital content because their professional environments reward them for achievements in the printed paper, but don’t incentivise their work online. 

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-13 18:04

Following the bankruptcy of its publisher Mediapubli, Spanish daily Público has announced that it will put out its final print edition this Sunday. Although the paper's website público.es will continue to operate, Cadena SER estimates that 130 of Público's 160 staff will lose their jobs.

Mediapubli declared bankruptcy at the beginning of January, and was given around a month to come up with enough funds to make Público economically viable. But although majority shareholder Jaume Roures sought investors in Mexico, Venezuela and Ecuador, the company was unable to come up with the necessary sum of around 9 million euros.

The announcement in Público said that the paper's financial difficulties were due to a worsening advertising crisis, profound changes in the newspaper industry and problems with finding new investors.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-24 17:25

Have we reached a turning point in digital growth? Paid Content reported today that the London-based international media group Future PLC managed to offset the decline in its print revenues in the UK with a rise in digital earnings.

The company has just published its Interim Management Statement, analysing its performance between 1 October and 31 December 2011. In the UK, where Future PLC has 75% of its business, digital circulation and ad revenues increased by 51% - enough to make up for a decline in print revenue. The company sees this development as "an important milestone in the evolution of the business".

However, Future PLC also notes that in the UK revenues did decline by 2%, but states that this was "chiefly as a result of the loss of a customer publishing contract".

In the US, revenue fell by 20%, as the company "anticipated", due to shinking print revenues and the closure of some publications. However, digital revenues rose by 24%, and the company claims that the growth in this area, along with cost-cutting measures and the sale of some US properties, should allow it to become profitable in the US again by 2013.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-08 12:57

For news publishers, there's no doubt that the digital age has well and truly arrived. eMarketer published a report in January predicting that online advertising spending in the United States will overtake print this year.

Spending on online ads in the US grew by 23% last year, totaling $32.03 billion, estimates eMarketer. The company, which provides analysis of internet market trends based on its own assessment of ad selling companies' reported revenues as well as on data from other industry sources, predicts that online ad spending will grow another 23.3% this year, to reach $39.5 billion.

Meanwhile, US print advertising, which totaled an estimated $36 billion in 2011, is expected to drop to $33.8 billion.

eMarketer forecasts a significant rise in online ad spending over the next five years; it predicts that by the year 2016, online ad spending will total $62 billion in the United States, and that print spending will drop to $32.3 billion.

Compared to other industry analysts, eMarketer's predictions are high, yet all forecast a meaningful rise in online ad spending in the coming years.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-03 14:02

On November 23 last year the Finnish parliament approved a government proposal to apply 9% VAT to newspaper and magazine subscriptions, which were previously exempt from the tax.

Today the European Journalism Centre has published an article about how the new tax, which came into effect at the beginning of this year, has affected Finnish newspapers.

In a nutshell, it's been tough for journalists. The EJC magazine reports that 100 media workers have already been laid off as a direct consequence of the new tax. 200 more jobs are on the line.

The tax has been controversial, partly because of the way Finnish politician Kimmo Sasi, who argued for the imposition of the new tax, spoke out against the media: "The members of the press tend to be a bit arrogant. They think: "We can write whatever we want about politicians, and they will have to dance to our music. Luckily the majority of the Parliament is not going to accept this," quotes the EJC.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-30 18:44

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