Date

Thu - 21.09.2017


press freedom

The Turkish government has fined media companies owned by publisher Dogan Yayin Holding, which operates more than half of the country's non-government media market, Reuters reported Tuesday.

The fines total 3.76 billion lira (US$2.53 billion) for unpaid taxes. They are in addition to the $500 million the publisher was fined earlier this year for "tax irregularities" having to do with its selling a 25 percent stake to Germany-based publisher Axel Springer. Dogan said the fines are the government's way of getting back at the publisher for reporting that has criticised the country's politics.

The International Press Institute has reported the fines signal "fresh concerns about media freedom in Turkey," and that the Dogan Media Group has been a target of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has asked his supporters to boycott Dogan and other newspapers. In February, government supporters physically attacked journalists.

"This fine which is far exceeding the cost of the Dogan entity itself, cannot be considered as a penalty. This is direct seizure and clearing off/liquidating a media organisation," Ferai Tinc, chairman of the IPI National Committee in Turkey and foreign editor and columnist for Hürriyet, said in a statement, according to the IPI.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-08 17:37

Suppressed Zimbabwean independent newspapers are furious at the launch of a state run tabloid paper, H-Metro, without the license they require to publish, the Times of Zimbabwe reported Tuesday.

Only the government is allowed to publish daily newspapers in Zimbabwe.
Webster Shamu, the media minister, claimed government newspapers do not need a license.

This was little to quell the frustration of Zimbabwe Independent newspapers owner Trevor Ncube, who has been waiting for a license for more than six months. The publisher, already putting out two weeklies, the Standard and the Zimbabwe Independent, has been trying to launch a daily paper, NewsDay.

Other independent daily newspapers in Zimbabwe have their licenses on hold, including the Daily Gazette and the Daily News.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-09-08 17:18

Gunmen sprayed the offices of newspaper El Siglo de Torreón with bullets from assault rifles last week, the most recent attack against media in Mexico. Following the violence, the head of the country's National Human Rights commission called for more action against violence perpetrated against media, and gave recommendations on how to better handle the violence to state governments, federal prosecutors and army officials, The Associated Press reported.

Fifty-two journalists and workers in the media industry have been killed in Mexico in the last 10 years, and authorities in the country have been "negligent in investigating and prosecuting the attacks," said Jose Luis Soberanes, the commission's president.

Meanwhile, seven other reporters have gone missing and six newspaper offices have come under fire from explosives in the last decade, he said.

Most violence is drug-related, and has killed more than 11,000 people in Mexico since the end of 2006, according to the AP. Of media-related deaths, in May El Siglo de Torreón crime reporter Eliseo Barron was killed, likely by a group of hit men connected with the Gulf cartel, the Zetas.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-27 15:09

The Press Union of Liberia, (PUL) has criticized the Ministry of Information's move to stop publication at two local newspapers, The New Broom and The Bi-Lingual, the Liberian Daily Observer reported Wednesday.

The PUL described the Ministry's prevention of printing and confiscation of the two papers as a breach of the Liberian Constitution and a government promise to harbor press freedom.

The PUL stated that without court orders, the seizure of the newspapers by Information Minister Dr. Laurence Bropleh and his staff was illegal.

AllAfrica.com reported that Bropleh "could neither deny nor confirm" PUL's allegation.

According to the PUL, the Alley printing press was ordered not to print the New Broom paper for an alleged breach of Ministry regulations, and the Bi-Lingual newspaper had told the PUL that it was denied use of the Seamarco Printing Press, according to the Daily Observer.

The moves by the Information ministry have been criticised by the PUL as step back to past political climates where the government was quick to shut down conflicting media outlets and change newspaper headlines through their hold of the Sabanoh Printing Press, formerly the country's only publishing house.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-08-12 20:14

While the developed world's newspaper industry has suffered on the back of the global recession and consequential advertising decline, the developing world has continued to support newspapers as literacy levels rise and access to technology remains limited, the Daily Dispatch Online reported today.

Addressing a 50 person audience Sunday, on World Press Freedom Day in Grahamstown, South Africa, Print Media South Africa Chairman Prakash Desai expressed his confidence in the ongoing importance and relevance of newspapers, predicting any major effects from the growth of online media will not occur in the near future. He said this was especially true for developing countries.

Of a population of 48 million, only three million South Africans have access to new technology and the Internet. Desai emphasised this was the situation of billions of others living in developing countries around the world.

"The quality of print journalism is far superior to any blog, Web or TV journalism. They do not match the print contribution ... this will ensure they (print) are here for eternity," he told more than 50 people at the Albany Museum, the Daily Dispatch reported.

Desai blamed issues of "bad debt" for the current financial woes western newspapers are suffering.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-05 15:44

As the global economy began to spiral last year, press freedom also declined for the first time in every region of the world, according to a new study from Freedom House, out today.

Press freedom continued to decrease for the seventh year in a row in 2008, and Italy, Israel and Hong Kong dropped from the study's category of "Free" to "Partly Free." There were twice as many press freedom losses as there were gains last year, with East Asia being a point of "particular concern," according to the study.

"The journalism profession today is up against the ropes and fighting to stay alive, as pressures from governments, other powerful actors and the global economic crisis take an enormous toll," said Jennifer Windsor, Freedom House executive director. "The press is democracy's first defense and its vulnerability has enormous implications for democracy if journalists are not able to carry out their traditional watchdog role."

Even countries where it was hoped that growing Internet and new media usage would aid press freedom growth were disappointed, with the study concluding freedom of the media "remained stagnant in 2008," the study states.

According to the report, findings by region showed that:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-01 22:06

Ghana's media industry is making rapid economic and professional developments, according to the African Media Barometer-Ghana Report 2008, the Daily Guide Ghana reported today. The report also revealed substantial development in media freedom and independence and showed Ghana media to be one of the most successful on the continent.

The African Media Barometer was launched in 2005 by the Southern African Media Project in conjunction with the Media Institute of Southern Africa. The bi-annual survey is a self-assessment undertaken by each African nation under unique self constructed criteria.

The 11-person Ghanaian panel, taken from the media and civil society industries, found substantial growth and development in the country's media output but also noted a lack of quality reporting, according to Daily Guide Ghana.

The survey found the country's general economic conditions a major hindrance to the performance of media groups in the country, who instead of pursuing expansion and growth, must fight for every day survival. Concurrently journalism is a largely underpaid profession.

President of Ghana Journalists Association, Ransford Tetteh, challenged media houses to find ways to increase the wages of the country's journalists so as to improve the standards of the media industry, Daily Guide Ghana reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-04-20 18:24

Zimbabwe is set to have its first independent daily newspaper in six years, with the planned launch of the NewsDay, newzimbabwe.com reported Thursday. African Media entrepreneur Trevor Ncube announced a US$4 million investment in the paper and describes it as a "litmus test" for the purported liberalisation of the country under the new unity government.

In 2003 Zimbabwe's largest and last privately owned daily newspaper, The Daily News, was forced into closure by the government. Many weekly papers suffered the same fate, as Robert Mugabe closed any forum for opposition support.
The new unity government, formed through a power sharing agreement between President Mugabe and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, has made commitments to democratic reform. Freedom of the press is a part of this change.

Ncube sees the new agreement as both a democratic and ecnomic oppurtunity for the nation. Owner of the Zimbabwe Independent and the Standard, as well as the Mail and Guardian published inSouth Africa, he feels "encouraged by the opportunites" offered by the new governing agreement. He was also hopeful for the economic conditions the unity government offers, newzimbabwe.com reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-13 10:21

Bolivia will see the launch of its first state-sponsored newspaper, President Evo Morales announced, according to an article by gipp.ru on Monday.

Morales said that for the first time the country's government will have its own publication that will help it to report "the truth" each day.

The president previously accused the country's journalists of lacking objectivity and leaning towards the opinion of "conservative-leaning" political parties, AFP reported nearly two weeks ago.

Morales refused to hold press conferences for Bolivian reporters. The leader said he would instead focus on "more responsible" international media outlets.

Gipp.ru did not mention the title of the future newspaper.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2008-12-31 00:27

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