Date

Sat - 18.11.2017


press freedom

In the latest dramatic episode in the trial of former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich, a document released by the Federal government clears the Chicago Tribune from an alleged extortion attempt from the former U.S. governor's staff. The 91-page proffer, prepared by the office of the United States Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, was unsealed upon the request of the Tribune, the Chicago Sun-Times and The Associated Press, the Sun Times notes.

The document lays out the plan the federal prosecutors will use against Blagojevich in the upcoming June corruption trial. In it unfolds the elaborate web of double-crossing orchestrated by John Harris, Blagojevich's chief of staff. According to Fitzgerald's report, Blagojevich believed that "the Tribune's negative coverage of him was fueling certain adversaries of his in the State legislature and...feeding the possibility of his impeachment."

Image: ABCNews.com

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-17 15:24

A new voluntary code of practice was signed by the Australian sports administrative authorities and leading media groups to resolve disputes between the groups that have gone on for years. Ongoing disputes and press coverage boycotts have centred over restrictions sports administrations had created which previously blocked news agencies from covering cricket and Australian Rules Football matches, Agence France-Presse reported today.

This new code is likely the first of its kind, and ends several restrictions the sports administration had placed on the media, such as not allowing the use of sports news and images online, including the number of updates on the events and the sites allowed to use sports images. They also aimed to restrict sports coverage on mobile platforms. Many media groups believed to be the restrictions to infringe on press freedom, and those that did not agree to them were not allowed to cover certain events.

The new code offers media groups the ability to cover sports events while also assuring sports organisations that photographs or text taken at the events will not be used for any commercial purposes beyond news reporting, according to AFP.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-30 22:59

On Monday, Google officially removed its search site from Chinese servers, submerging the country in a partial Google blackout much sooner than expected

The company still hosts some Google services, such as Google Docs and Google News, in China, but it has moved its search operations off the mainland to Hong Kong. Because of China's "One Country, Two Systems" policy, Hong Kong has many of its own laws, which don't include the censorship requirements that the Beijing government has imposed upon Google. When Chinese users on the mainland attempt to go to Google.cn, they are directed to Google.co.hk, which aims to bypass those requirements. and drawing both outrage and praise for the act.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-24 19:23

Google may may pull out China on April 10, and could announce its exit strategy as early as Monday, Telegraph.co.uk reported today. The dates originate from reports by China Business News, Bloomberg reported, which cite an unidentified Chinese sales agent for the company. However, Google has not confirmed the information, and a Google spokeswoman from Japan declined to comment.

The search giant has told employees in China that they could move to the company's U.S. headquarters or other offices in the Asia-Pacific region, according to the Telegraph.

In January, Google announced it was rethinking how businesses was being done in China, following the breach of Gmail accounts belonging to Chinese human rights activists. The "highly sophisticated" cyber attacks originated from within China.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-19 18:26

The Republic of Belarus would have tighter rules regarding the distribution of foreign publications, Ejednevnik reported Monday. Officials met to bring about alterations in the decree governing the availability of foreign media.

Modifications were made to the types of "foreign sources of mass information" that were to be imported. Banned will be content that may harm national safety with war propaganda as well as mention of rape, cruelty, extremism, and drug use. In addition, material that isn't available in Belarus or that doesn't correspond to the state's laws is to be prohibited.

On Monday, President Alexander Lukashenko signed an order that obliges Internet providers to store information on users and the sites they visit, AFP reported Tuesday.

The decree outlines that the data be made readily available to law enforcement figures upon request.

According to Deutsche Welle, the move was justified by reinforcing the necessity of fighting "against everything illegal and to improve the security of this country and its citizens." "It's complete control of information," said Andrei Bastunets, deputy chairman of the Belarussian Association of Journalists. "After all, apart from the Internet, Belarus practically has no free media."

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-02-03 19:39

Following Google's announcement last week that it may leave China, the Chinese government has fired back, calling Google's action a "corporate maneuver," paidContent reported.

According to a statement by Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu, "there is no exception for Google" in observing China's laws and shouldering its social responsibilities, China Daily, a state-run publication, reported. "Foreign companies in China should respect the laws and regulations, respect the public interest of Chinese people and China's culture and customs and shoulder due social responsibilities."

However, Google calls China's laws "attempts ... to further limit free speech on the web," David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer of Google, stated in a Google blog post last week.

Ma stated that China's Internet is open, and will keep on creating a favourable investment environment for foreign businesses, including Internet companies, and to protect their legitimate rights.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-01-19 21:09

Google announced on Tuesday it is rethinking how it does business in China, following the breach of Gmail accounts belonging to Chinese human rights activists. The "highly sophisticated" cyber attacks originated from within China.

"These attacks and the surveillance they have uncovered - combined with the attempts over the past year to further limit free speech on the web - have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our business operations in China. We have decided we are no longer willing to continue censoring our results on Google.cn, and so over the next few weeks we will be discussing with the Chinese government the basis on which we could operate an unfiltered search engine within the law, if at all. We recognize that this may well mean having to shut down Google.cn, and potentially our offices in China," David Drummond, senior vice president of corporate development and chief legal officer of Google stated in a Google blog post.

China has responded to the announcement saying it welcomes Internet companies as long as they obey laws by censoring their content, Bloomberg reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-01-14 19:59

In an attempt to more tightly control its image following news of Dubai's US$26 billion debt, the Gulf Arab emirate's leader has established a new media office to handle all government-related media, Reuters reported Sunday.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum has announced a new law "to establish Dubai Media Office, which will be annexed to the ruler's court," and handle all media relations for the ruler, crown prince and government officials, by combining existing government public relations units: Dubai Press Club, Falcon & Associates and Brand Dubai, according to a statement.

The new office is "another sign of greater autocratic control," Christopher Davidson, professor of Middle East politics at UK's Durham University and author of "Dubai: The Vulnerability of Success," told Zawaya Dow Jones. "There is a growing anti-Western tinge to Dubai, especially towards the British Press."

The new media office will monitor and analyse the news published by local, Arab and international media organisations about Dubai, and also monitor the latest public opinion trends regarding events, WAM Emirates News Agency reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-01-12 19:15

The editor-in-chief of two Pakistani newspapers received the Golden Pen award today at the WAN-IFRA 2009 World Newspaper Congress - World Editor's Forum.

Najam Sethi, editor-in-chief of Pakistan's Daily Times and Friday Times accepted his award Tuesday, December 1, in Hyderabad, India at the opening ceremony of the conference.

For more on this story, visit our partner site, the Editors Weblog.

Sethi, second from left, receives congratulations. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-01 09:34

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) has expressed absolute dismay and condemnation of the horrific massacre of 12 journalists, in an attack on a convoy in the southern Philippines which killed at least 46 people.

The journalists were travelling with a group of politicians and political supporters planning to file nomination papers for Esmael Mangudadatu, an opposition gubernatorial candidate in Maguindanao province, when the attack occurred on 23 November.

According to local reports, around 100 armed men, allegedly supporters of the current governor, ambushed the group and took the victims to a remote location where some of them were killed and buried in a mass grave. More members of the group are missing, and are also believed to have been murdered. There is evidence that the journalists were specifically selected for murder.

In a statement, WAN-IFRA, the global association of the world's press, called on the Philippine government to urgently investigate this monstrous attack and bring its perpetrators to justice. The association said an "unprecedented" government response was necessary, in a country with a long history of violence against journalists and civilians.

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2009-11-24 13:31

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