Date

Wed - 20.09.2017


premium content

The Chicago Tribune has announced that it will be offering subscribers a new Sunday books section as a piece of premium paid content.

Printers Row, as the section will be called, will cost Tribune subscribers an additional $99 a year. Those who sign up will get a 24-page book supplement every Sunday, featuring reviews, interviews with authors and news from Chicago's literary scene as well as a free book of short stories each week.

The Chicago Tribune describes the launch in its own business section as "a means to bolster revenue beyond the traditional subscription and advertising model" by offering readers with niche interests a high-quality targeted product that they will be willing to pay for. Gerould Kern, senior vice president and editor of the Chicago Tribune states that "audiences want very specialized information, and we are going to give them that".

The Tribune compares its model to cable TV subscriptions, which encourage users to sign up to a basic package and then pay for extra premium channels.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-24 18:07

A Texas newspaper organization offers free online content, including breaking news and obituaries, and requires paid subscriptions for access to more in depth work. Four months in, editor Carlos Sanchez says it's too soon to pinpoint trends but so far the company has seen a drop in Web traffic and an increase in print subscriptions. Public reaction has been evenly mixed between approving and critical, Sanchez says.

Continue reading on Knight Digital Media Center

Author

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-19 18:04

Independent News and Media last week unveiled premium content across its 13 regional newspaper Web sites in Ireland.

The newspapers will continue carrying a considerable amount of free content across the newspaper Web sites, Patrick Lenehan, CTO of Independent Digital, told SFN. The non-newspaper sourced content was built up over the past 18 months.

Newspapers now under the freemium model include: the Kerryman, Corkman, Sligo Champion, Drogheda Independent, Fingal Independent, The Argus, Bray People, Carlow People, Enniscorthy Guardian, Gorey Guardian, New Ross Standard, Wicklow People and Wexford People.

"This is very much a trial. There are no plans to launch across our national newspaper brands (e.g. Independent.ie) as the national newspaper Web sites perform very well with an advertising supported model - in fact they are market leaders commercially," Lenehan stated in an e-mail.

The launch of the new freemium model was showcased to print readers with a full-page colour ad in each regional newspaper. The ad included a letter from the editor and information detailing which content would be paid, and which would be free.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-29 23:32

Bloomberg LP may charge up to US$1,000 per year for access to some news on its Web site, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday. Although Bloomberg would not confirm WSJ's report - the two are financial news rivals - it did say it is "in the process of evaluating various approaches," according to paidContent.

Bloomberg.com is currently free, and the site's users already do not have access to all the financial data professional users pay for, either through subscriptions or through Bloomberg's special terminals, common in newsrooms and financial firms.

Kevin Krim, head of Bloomberg's online consumer media division, is reported to have said some users could be charged between $600 and $1,000 for some content they currently can access on the site for free, paidContent reported.

Bloomberg last month bought BusinessWeek magazine, which also has plans to charge for online content and ramp up its print edition, according to MediaWeek.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-05 21:08

YouTube is sticking to its decision to make premium music videos inaccessible to UK users, following a stalemate in licensing discussions with the Performing Rights Society, BBC News reported Tuesday.

Since its acquisition by Google in 2006, YouTube has faced pressure to increase revenues.

However, YouTube's Video Partnership Director Patrick Walker said the video sharing site is committed to reaching an agreement with PRS, but the high licensing fees PRS is asking cannot be sustained by the YouTube business model, the BBC reported. PRS is requesting that Google re-examine its stand.

"It is a example of the question of how do you price and fund content in the digital world?" said Lord Carter, the UK's Minister for Communications and Broadcasting, according to the BBC.

"The rate they are applying would mean we would lose significant amounts of money on every stream of a music video. It is not a reasonable rate to ask," Walker told the BBC.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-11 18:51

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation