Date

Mon - 24.07.2017


Pew Research

A survey conducted by the Pew Research Centre for the People & the Press has revealed rising mistrust of the press in the USA. For the second time since 2002, public faith in the credibility of US news outlets has diminished: the ‘positive believability ratings’ for nine out of the thirteen news organisations included in the poll have experienced a sharp decline, recalling a similar downturn experienced between 2002 and 2004.

The survey covered both television and radio broadcasters and newspaper companies and asked 1001 people to rank the believability of individual news organisations on a 4-point scale. A rating of 4 meant that someone accepted “all or most of what the news organisations say” to be true and 1 indicates that an individual believed “almost nothing”. On average 56% of individuals who contributed to the study gave news titles, including USA Today and The Wall Street Journal, a rating of 3-4 points. This figure stood at 62% only two years ago, and demonstrates a considerable drop in public trust in the news media since 2002 when the average positive rating stood at 71%.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-20 17:30

According to the 2012 annual State of News Media report, more Americans than ever own and receive news from smartphones and tablet computers, the Pew Research Center reported.

survey of 3,000 adults conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism found that 44% of people over 18 now own a smartphone, while 18% of adults own tablets—a 50% increase in tablet usage from the summer of 2011.

The survey found that, of the majority of Americans who own a desktop or laptop computer, more than half also own a smartphone. In addition, it found that almost a third of smartphone owners also own a tablet. Overall, 13% of the adults surveyed owned all three devices.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication www.editorsweblog.org

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-20 18:26

Ad revenue falling, print circulation down, newsroom cuts, no new business model in sight… It’s not uncommon to read reports about the dire situation that the US newspaper industry finds itself in. But are things really as bad as all that? As the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism publishes its annual report today on the state of American media, we have a chance to step back and look in greater details at how the US newspapers handled their search for a new business digital business model over the course of the last year.

There’s no denying that the figures make grim reading, particularly when it comes to newspapers’ advertising revenue. Pew references Newspaper Association of America statistics, which estimate that online ad spend at papers grew by $207 million, but print ad spend fell by $2.1 billion, meaning that for print losses at US papers were ten times greater than digital gains.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-19 15:11

As Shakespeare might have said, the course of transferring to a digital revenue model never did run smooth...

A report published today by Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism highlights the difficulties that many US news organisations are having in adapting their business models to the digital age.

The report states that for every dollar that papers gain from increased digital ad revenue, they lose seven from decreased print ad sales. "In general," asserts Pew, "the shift to replace losses in print ad revenue with new digital revenue is taking longer and proving more difficult than executives want."

The report was based on data from 38 newspapers from across six US media companies, as well as on interviews conducted with the company executives in 2011. This year, Pew also carried out follow-up interviews with executives from the original six media groups, as well as talks with management figures at an additional seven companies. The 13 firms who participated in the study in some way represented a total of 330 daily papers - a pretty comprehensive sample.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-05 16:20

About three-quarters of American men and women are Internet users, according to the Pew Internet and American Life Project conducted in late 2009.

The Pew study examined the demographics of Internet users in America, and found that 76 percent of whites, 70 percent of blacks and 64 percent of Hispanics in America are Internet users, detailed in World Digital Media Trends 2010, released by the Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

The study showed that the younger people are, the more likely they are to be Internet users. Ninety-three percent of those between ages 12 and 29 were Internet users, while 81 percent of those ages 30 to 49 used the Internet. That number continues to drop with age: 70 percent of those ages 50 to 64 use the Internet, while 38 percent of those 65+ do so.

The study also tracked the percentage of adult Internet users in the United States from 1995 onward - it has grown from about 10 percent in 1995 to almost 80 percent in 2009.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-12-13 19:16

According to the new study "Mobile Access 2010," released by Pew Internet & American Life Project, in April 2010, 38 percent of U.S. mobile device owner surf the Internet using their mobile devices, up from 25 percent year-over-year, Media Post reported.

As 82 percent of U.S. adult population has a mobile device, this means that about 31 percent of all U.S. adults access mobile Internet in 2010, Pew reported.

In terms of e-commerce, the study also found that 11 percent of U.S. mobile device owners, or 9 percent of the adult population at large, have ever purchased using the mobile Internet. The age group between 18 to 29 years old has the highest percentage, which is 20 percent. To divide it by ethnic groups, 18 percent of English-speaking Hispanics and 13 percent of African-American consumers have ever tried e-commerce on a mobile device, while only 10 percent for the non-Hispanic white population has ever done so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-07-10 01:45

According to Pew Research Center for the People & the Press December 2008 Political & Economic Survey, most respondents (70 percent) said they get most of their national and International news from TV, compared with 40 percent from the Internet and 35 percent from newspapers.

Scores for TV and newspapers slipped from 2001 to 2008, from 74 percent to 70 percent, and from 45 percent to 35 percent, respectively. The Internet, however, surged from 13 percent to 40 percent in that time. The year 2008 was the first time the Internet exceeded newspapers in the survey, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

Among young people between ages 18 and 29, the Internet was ranked as one of the top main news sources, along with TV - each with 59 percent of respondents saying so. However, TV's score dropped 11 percent from 2007 to 2008, while the Internet grew by 25 percent, up from 32 percent in August 2006 to 59 percent in December 2008, according to Pew.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2009-12-07 21:42

A recent Pew survey shows that online journalists are more optimistic about their careers than those in more traditional media fields, yet they are concerned about the quality of journalism online even more than they are concerned about finding a profitable business model. Findings published on the Pew Research Center's site were collected in a survey of members of the Online News Association (ONA).

Many professionals believe the Internet is "changing the fundamental values of journalism," and taking it in the wrong direction. However, the majority of those surveyed were reticent to disapprove of the progress of online media, and confident that the news form would find a way of generating revenue, despite disappointing trends in advertising returns.

An overall sense of compromise in the realm of standards, values and accuracy with regard to journalism was reported by those surveyed.

About two-thirds of the online journalists said they believed the future business model for online content rests with advertising, predicting that most revenue would come from ads in three years. Twenty-five percent, however, believed a new revenue model would be relied on, the study stated.

Pew's study was the first to target members of the ten-year-old ONA, the largest association of online media professionals. Almost 300 people were surveyed.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-03-31 10:23

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